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NEWS
November 15, 2009
The Laurel Historical Society has prepared a display at the Stanley Memorial Library, 507 Seventh St., that features photos depicting scenes from Laurel in the early 1900s, the 1950s and today. Hours are 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Mondays-Wednesdays, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays. Call 301-776-6790.
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NEWS
Peter Crispino and For The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
In the 2.3 acres surrounding Asbury Broadneck United Methodist Church, a subtle link to local history lies in a cemetery that dates back nearly 200 years. At least 1,800 graves - few with headstones, many belonging to former slaves - are on the grounds, each bearing a story and a key to the past. For the past 15 months, a dedicated team from the church has worked to identify each person buried there and perhaps even discover their stories. "It's important that we know who helped pave the way for us, because if this generation does not do it, I don't know what the next generation will do," said Elinor Thompson, who has led the effort.
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NEWS
May 25, 2013
I'm of the era when a certain powerful individual also wielded the Internal Revenue Service as an effective weapon against any and all perceived enemies. The French, of course say: Le plus ca change, le plus c'est la meme chose. But I'm reminded of a lovely little Hebrew couplet that translates roughly: The very same Miss/In a change of dress Not only does it evoke the tendencies of governmental practices, but also lends an added eerily Hooveresque quality! Vivian D. Braun, Baltimore
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
Perra S. Bell, a former Towson University history teacher who was a lifelong crusader for civil rights, died Sept. 26 at Physicians Regional Medical Center in Naples, Fla., of complications from a fractured hip. The former Baltimore resident was 95. "She was such a character and had such influence promoting racial equality in so many ways, but not in a flamboyant way," said her daughter, Jane Bell Kiester of Marco Island, Fla. "She was feisty and...
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
The historic Rodgers Forge neighborhood in Towson has adopted guidelines for residents who want to install solar panels, an effort community leaders hope can strike a balance between preserving the community's architecture and embracing alternative energy. A committee of the Rodgers Forge Community Association worked for about a year to come up with the recommendations, which the full board approved in September, according to immediate past president Stu Sirota. "I think this shows that Rodgers Forge is a progressive neighborhood that cares about its history and maintaining the architectural integrity of its homes, while still being able to allow a modern and innovative green technology," Sirota said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
They have so much in common, these three long-dead holy women, their corpses dripping with jewels, that it's as though they've been calling back and forth to one another from across the centuries. Now that their images are in the same room at the American Visionary Art Museum , the murmur of their voices is almost audible. There's St. Kateri, holding a bouquet of her talisman - lilies - and reciting the Lord's Prayer in the Mohawk language. Embedded in the icon is a vial of water taken from the spring where Kateri lived in the 17th century.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
Officials at two Washington, D.C.-area hospitals said Friday they had isolated patients over fears of Ebola after the nation's first case of the deadly virus was confirmed in Dallas this week. But officials at one of the hospitals, Shady Grove Adventist Hospital in Rockville, determined late Friday that their patient had malaria, not Ebola, hospital officials said in a statement late Friday. Howard University Hospital quarantined a patient who had recently traveled to Nigeria out of "an abundance of caution," officials said.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Johns Hopkins isn't the only area Division III program with an untarnished record in 2014. Stevenson is 4-0 overall and 3-0 in the Middle Atlantic Conference and earned votes in the latest American Football Coaches Association poll. It's the first time the program has won its first four games of the season, and the team has already matched single-season records in overall victories and league wins set last year. Considering that the Mustangs were 8-22 overall and 6-20 in the conference, the current run might be shocking to some, but not to coach Ed Hottle.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
When Orioles executive vice president Dan Duquette introduced Nelson Cruz to the media back in February, he was quick to point out the slugger's postseason accolades. There's no doubt the Orioles have gotten their money's worth in their one-year, $8 million investment in the 34-year-old pending free agent, but could the true payoff be ahead? Cruz will head into the Orioles' American League Division League Series matchup against the Detroit Tigers with 34 postseason games under his belt.
NEWS
September 28, 2014
Of all the offices in the federal government, the job of attorney general may be one of the toughest as well the most thankless. Eric H. Holder, who announced last week that he is stepping down as the nation's top law enforcement official six years after becoming the first African-American ever to hold that position, was no stranger to the controversy that comes with the job nor to the endless stream of criticism directed at its occupants. His tenure was not perfect - the failure to crack down sufficiently on the financial speculators who brought our economy to ruin being perhaps the greatest shortcoming.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | September 28, 2014
This is a tale of two countries. The first country was built on a radical new promise of human equality and a guarantee of the right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. That country made it possible for even those born in the humblest and most meager circumstances to climb to the pinnacle of prosperity and achievement. It helped save the world in a great global conflagration, fed and rebuilt the devastated nations of Europe, planted the first footprints on another world.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Though there still is a slight chance that the Orioles could overtake the Los Angeles Angels and finish the season with the best record in baseball, it's far more likely that they will be the second seed and will match up against either the Detroit Tigers or Kansas City Royals in the American League Division Series. So, who do you think would be a more vulnerable opponent? It might seem obvious, since the Tigers have all those great starting pitchers and the best middle-of-the-lineup hitter in the sport, but there are also reasons to fear the scrappy Royals, who have a terrific bullpen and a very balanced offensive lineup full of guys who find ways to win. Guess that's why they are battling down to the wire for the AL Central title.
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