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By Gary Cohn and Gary Cohn,SUN STAFF | November 17, 1996
Sherria Owens is a 16-year-old junior at Western High School with a dream of becoming a cardiovascular surgeon. Yesterday she went to listen to, and question, representatives from some of the nation's most distinguished historically black colleges at a College Fair at the Baltimore Convention Center.The College Fair was part of a four-day national conference in Baltimore on Family and Community Violence Prevention. It is sponsored in part by a group of 19 historically black universities and colleges, including Morgan State University.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2014
One day in 1870, 41 newly freed slaves got together in Jackson, Miss., to establish a new branch of mainstream Methodism called the Colored Methodist Episcopal Church. Hundreds of members of that denomination, now known as the Christian Methodist Episcopal Church, gathered at the Baltimore Convention Center Friday to consecrate the 61st, 62nd and 63rd bishops in its history. A two-hour service marked the end of the historically black denomination's weeklong general conference, a convention members hold every four years to choose new leaders and weigh doctrinal changes.
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FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | February 12, 2002
Despite the tendency to lump all African-American art into a tradition of protest and racial pride, black artists historically have explored a surprisingly broad range of styles, materials and methods to express their experience. That diversity of approaches is perhaps the most striking aspect of this month's show at School 33 Art Center, A Visual Legacy: The Art of Maryland's Historically Black Colleges and Universities. The first piece you see as you enter the show is among the most impressive: Ernest Satchell's full-scale figure of an old man sitting on a bench is so lifelike that you almost have to look twice to see it's not a real person.
NEWS
By David Wilson | June 23, 2014
A few years ago, the Maryland legislature appointed a panel to assess the way it was funding higher education. As part of its scope, the panel evaluated the funding needs of the state's historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs), paying particular attention to the research infrastructure needs at Morgan State University, which in 2005 had received the coveted Carnegie designation of "Doctoral Research University" without any additional infusion of state resources. It achieved this designation because it annually awarded the requisite number of doctoral degrees and received sufficient external federal research funding to qualify.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | October 2, 1999
Enrollment has declined at two of the three historically black colleges in the state's university system for the first time in 15 years, according to figures presented to the Board of Regents yesterday.The biggest drop is at Bowie State University, which enrolled 76 fewer full-time freshmen than a year ago, a decline of 18.1 percent. That rises to almost 23 percent if part-time freshmen are included -- 506 students last year compared with 390 this year.Bowie State's interim president, former regent Wendell Holloway, attributed part of the drop to rising standards at the school.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2004
At Salisbury University, they're running out of room. More than 6,200 students are packed into the increasingly popular state college, which now turns down more than half its applicants. It's a different scene just 12 miles south at the historically black University of Maryland Eastern Shore in Princess Anne. The 620-acre campus is studded with gleaming new buildings - but there are only about 3,300 undergraduates to use them. The contrast points to a quandary facing Maryland higher education officials that few like to discuss publicly.
FEATURES
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | May 28, 2001
Of the things that Dr. Miles Harrison Jr. and Chip Silverman envisioned growing out of their book, "Ten Bears," a few have materialized, and others will remain dreams. On the one hand, Morgan State University has no plans to revive its men's lacrosse program, which the book traces from its founding in 1969 through a momentous upset win in 1975. Morgan's cash-strapped athletic department folded the program in 1980. On the other hand, the co-authors succeeded in reviving memories of an odd yet significant chapter in Morgan State's history, as well as in the sport of lacrosse, which decides its NCAA Division I championship today.
NEWS
By SUN STAFF | December 14, 2000
ANNAPOLIS - Black legislators heard from state higher education officials yesterday in a briefing aimed at securing additional support for the state's historically black colleges and universities. The legislators expressed concern that while funding for the four schools is high now, it has not been sufficient to erase past inequities. "If we ever start pulling the belt in, all too often the schools that get squeezed first are the historically black schools," said Del. Nathaniel McFadden of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | June 29, 2000
Officials of the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Civil Rights now say that if Maryland's desegregation efforts fail to attract white students to historically black campuses, the state will not necessarily be in violation of federal regulations. "We are not forcing anybody to go anywhere," said Wendella P. Fox, the civil rights official who is working with the state on its desegregation plan. "We just want to ensure that everybody has the opportunity to go where they want to go," she said.
NEWS
By Joe Pettit | January 21, 2008
The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., whose birthday we celebrate today, moved a nation to confront the legacy of slavery, the consequences of legalized segregation and the devastation of racial inequality - including educational inequality. His abiding legacy provides a challenging context for the recent debate over the proper role of historically black colleges and universities in American higher education. Some argue that historically black colleges and universities are unnecessary and ineffective.
NEWS
By John L. Hudgins | June 2, 2014
As the nation moves toward President Obama's goal of college degrees for 60 percent of Americans by 2020, the role of historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) becomes even more important - particularly in Maryland, where 48 percent of African American students attend one of four HBCUs, compared with 16 percent nationwide. A college degree is more important than ever, with the pay gap between college graduates and non-graduates reaching a record high last year. According to a Washington Post report, graduates earned on average nearly double the hourly rate of non-graduates.
NEWS
By David Wilson | November 19, 2013
Nearly 820,000 international students - a national record - studied at universities in the United States during the 2012-2013 academic year, according to a report released this month by the Institute for International Education. At Morgan State University, we have been working to attract many of these students knowing that today's careers often require a global focus. Our efforts are now bearing significant fruit. We have well over 400 international students at Morgan this academic year - an all-time high for us. We have students from 63 countries, including China, Brazil, Nepal, Saudi Arabia and various nations in Europe and Africa, and they are adding immeasurably to the diversity on our campus.
NEWS
By George La Noue | October 27, 2013
U.S. District Court Judge Catherine Blake issued a long awaited, 60-page ruling this month in the case Coalition for Educational Equity and Excellence v. Maryland Higher Education Commission. The litigation was brought by supporters of Maryland's historically black institutions (HBIs), Bowie State University, Coppin State University, Morgan State University and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. The plaintiffs argued that the state of Maryland had failed in its obligation under the 14th Amendment's Equal Protection Clause to desegregate its higher education system.
NEWS
October 13, 2013
A federal district court judge handed Maryland's historically black colleges and universities a partial and in many respects problematic victory last week. She denied them the monetary damages they sought but ruled that the state may not allow its traditionally white schools to unnecessarily duplicate their popular, unique academic programs. U.S. District Judge Catherine C. Blake said such duplication has the effect of perpetuating the inequalities inherent in the dual system of higher education established during the era of segregation, and thus illegally discriminates against black students.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2013
Martin Ngwa, a student at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore, plans to go into social work after graduation — though his school doesn't offer the major. Thanks to an unusual partnership between UMES, an historically black institution, and Salisbury University, its traditionally white neighbor, Ngwa is earning dual degrees in sociology and social work. The opportunity to take classes on both Eastern Shore campuses is the result of several decades of collaboration — a partnership that was praised this week in a federal court opinion that found some Maryland policies still promote "separate but equal" colleges and universities.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2013
When Tasha Wilkie helped out in the math department as an undergrad at Coppin State University, she dealt with some students who came in without basic skills. They didn't know their multiplication tables or how to work with fractions. "We have students who've taken courses like three times" before they passed, said Wilkie, who graduated in 2011 and is now working toward a doctorate in biology at Ohio State University. There, she realized she also was ill-equipped for some classes by her studies at Coppin.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 28, 2001
The Board of Regents of the University System of Maryland approved funding guidelines yesterday designed to comply with the agreement the state signed with the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Civil Rights last year. That agreement calls for enhancements to Maryland's historically black colleges and universities, and the regents agreed to request an additional 10 percent of the annual operating expenses at the three historically black schools in the system beginning in fiscal year 2002.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau | November 2, 1993
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton, after an emotional speech about inner-city children preoccupied with death, yesterday signed an executive order designed to channel federal money and expertise to historically black colleges and universities."
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