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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 14, 2003
I love history, and I love the idea of using television to illuminate the joys of historical research. But I don't like History Detectives - a new 10-week series from PBS that purports to "bring American history to life in a whole new way" - very much at all. Great idea, poor execution. PBS hypes the series as "Antiques Roadshow meets CSI," allusions to both public television's highly successful show about the appraisal of antiques and collectibles, and the CBS hit drama about a team of forensic investigators working for the City of Las Vegas Police Department.
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NEWS
September 4, 2014
Museum raffle The Captain Avery Museum's 26th annual fundraising raffle is under way. Top prize is $5,000, and tickets are $5 each. The winning ticket will be drawn at the West River Heritage Day Oyster Festival at 5 p.m. Oct. 19 at the museum, 1418 E. West Shady Side Road in Shady Side. Checks, payable to the Captain Avery Museum, can be mailed to: P.O. Box 89, Shady Side, MD 20764, or call 410-867-4486. Directors needed The Annapolis Summer Garden Theatre is accepting applications for directors for its 50th performance season next summer.
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NEWS
September 4, 2014
Museum raffle The Captain Avery Museum's 26th annual fundraising raffle is under way. Top prize is $5,000, and tickets are $5 each. The winning ticket will be drawn at the West River Heritage Day Oyster Festival at 5 p.m. Oct. 19 at the museum, 1418 E. West Shady Side Road in Shady Side. Checks, payable to the Captain Avery Museum, can be mailed to: P.O. Box 89, Shady Side, MD 20764, or call 410-867-4486. Directors needed The Annapolis Summer Garden Theatre is accepting applications for directors for its 50th performance season next summer.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2013
Attorneys challenging a death sentence before the state's highest court last week dug deeply into online historical documents to divine the intention behind what they think is a never-before-interpreted part of the state's constitution. Public defender Brian Saccenti and a team of lawyers rested their argument in part on a once-famous 18th-century book by a young Italian nobleman named Cesare Beccaria, who suggested that capital punishment should be reserved for treasonous criminals.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 23, 1996
Elizabeth "Libby" Fletcher Hartley, a researcher of Baltimore's cultural, social and architectural past, died Oct. 13 of cancer at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson. She was 65 and lived in Charlesbrooke in North Baltimore.Her interest in historical research was stimulated by a purchase in the late 1950s of a portrait of a Mrs. Gomm, an Englishwoman."She was interested in finding out who she was and she kept looking until she discovered that she was the wife of Sir William Gomm, an English field marshal who was a contemporary of the Duke of Wellington," said her son, John H. Eager IV of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2013
Attorneys challenging a death sentence before the state's highest court last week dug deeply into online historical documents to divine the intention behind what they think is a never-before-interpreted part of the state's constitution. Public defender Brian Saccenti and a team of lawyers rested their argument in part on a once-famous 18th-century book by a young Italian nobleman named Cesare Beccaria, who suggested that capital punishment should be reserved for treasonous criminals.
NEWS
September 30, 1991
Services for Selma H. Adler, an historical researcher and lifelong Baltimore resident, will be at 3 p.m. tomorrow at Roland Park Place, 830 W. 40th St.Mrs. Adler, who was 92, died Thursday at the Roland Park Place health center of complications from recent surgery.The former Selma Hamburger was a 1916 graduate of Western High School, a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Goucher College, and attended Columbia University in New York.In the early 1920s, Mrs. Adler worked as assistant to the registrar at Goucher College.
NEWS
September 30, 1991
Selma H. Adler, a historical researcher and lifelong Baltimore resident, died Thursday at the Roland Park Place health center of complications from recent surgery. She was 92.Services for Mrs. Adler will be held at 3 p.m. tomorrow at Roland Park Place, 830 W. 40th St.The former Selma Hamburger was a 1916 graduate of Western High School, a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Goucher College, and attended Columbia University in New York.In the early 1920s, Mrs. Adler was assistant to the registrar at Goucher College.
NEWS
November 17, 2003
Janet Lee Waddy, a former Maryland Historical Society researcher, died of cancer Friday at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. She was 88. Janet Lee Jones was born in Farmville, Va., and moved to the 1100 block of N. Bond St. in Baltimore at age 8. She attended Frederick Douglass High School and later returned to night school, where she earned her General Educational Development diploma in 1965. She also took courses at the Community College of Baltimore. In 1938, she married James Waddy Sr., who was maitre d' hotel for many years at the University Club on North Charles Street.
NEWS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | November 13, 2003
The letters and photographs from grateful patients to the late Dr. Helen Taussig are filed safely away at the Johns Hopkins University. They are bits of history, carefully preserved to add patients' voices to the story of a doctor who saved infants with the pioneering "blue-baby" surgery, then kept in touch long after the babies grew up. But a new federal patient privacy rule might keep many of the documents - as well as other, similar ones - from ever...
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 14, 2003
I love history, and I love the idea of using television to illuminate the joys of historical research. But I don't like History Detectives - a new 10-week series from PBS that purports to "bring American history to life in a whole new way" - very much at all. Great idea, poor execution. PBS hypes the series as "Antiques Roadshow meets CSI," allusions to both public television's highly successful show about the appraisal of antiques and collectibles, and the CBS hit drama about a team of forensic investigators working for the City of Las Vegas Police Department.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | June 17, 1997
Molly McGaughran got her idea from books about the Salem witch trials. Kyle Lowden got his from anthologies of the Beatles' work. A movie about the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League was Courtney Istre's inspiration.The origin is not nearly as important as the result, say the judges in the National History Day contest, and the result should make history come alive.The three middle-school and high-school students are representative of 2,000 from 47 states competing for scholarships and cash awards at the University of Maryland College Park this week.
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