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By Houston Chronicle | September 18, 1994
If you ever find yourself with a spare afternoon in central Alabama, head to Tannahill Historical State Park. This beautiful park caters to campers but offers the one-day visitor plenty of activities, too.Short, well-marked trails snake around the park and its more than 50 historical sites. The longest trail, about five miles, follows the 1815 stagecoach road, while others lead to an old ironworks furnace, slave-quarters ruins or an 1867 gristmill.lTC And if you're not interested in a hike, explore the buildings, most dating to Civil War times, scattered throughout the park.
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By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2013
For 23 years, the Howard County Conservancy has been a staple in the county's western landscape, a sprawling, 232-acre farm in Woodstock that, on any given day, is teeming with schoolchildren or outdoor enthusiasts. Yet the eastern portion of Howard — namely the towns of Elkridge and Jessup — have sometimes seemed like a distant world for conservancy officials to attract. That might be about to change, though, as the nonprofit conservancy will have an opportunity to extend its reach to the east.
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FEATURES
By Dorothy Fleetwood and Dorothy Fleetwood,Contributing Writer | February 20, 1994
To celebrate its 50th anniversary in 1994, Harpers Ferry National Historical Park has scheduled numerous activities.This month, events focus on black history and an exhibit that examines the Niagara Movement, a turn-of-the-century civil rights organization led by W. E. B. DuBois. The organization, a precursor of the NAACP, held its second meeting in Harpers Ferry, W.Va., in 1906. A few years later, many of its members joined the newly formed NAACP. The exhibit, "The Call for Justice and the Struggle for Equality: Niagara and Beyond," will remain through 1994 at the John Brown Museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2010
Even the rich shared their homes with strangers in order to make ends meet in early Maryland. And their children, like the children of the working class and the slaves, were given household responsibilities at the youngest ages. Visitors to Historic London Town and Gardens, a 23-acre park featuring history and archaeology in southern Anne Arundel County, can now get an intimate look at the lives of three families as they lived when this town was Maryland's most important port city.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | September 5, 1996
When Gwen Marable moved to Baltimore from New York in 1990, she assigned students in her literacy program a book on the life of African-American scientist Benjamin Banneker.Two years later, she learned of a more personal connection to Banneker: A cousin told her by phone that Marable was a descendant of Maryland's famed mathematician, astronomer and surveyor, dubbed "the first black man of science.""It was a feeling of not quite believing it, being awed by it -- and then having to re-believe it," Marable, president of The Friends of Benjamin Banneker Historical Park and Museum, said yesterday during a groundbreaking ceremony in Oella for the long-awaited project.
NEWS
By Luciana Lopez and Luciana Lopez,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 12, 2003
In late July, when a visitor to the new Cedar Creek and Belle Grove National Historical Park walked into the headquarters of the Cedar Creek Battlefield Foundation, Danny Ambrose got a reminder of just how far the national park still has to grow. Ambrose, the assistant administrator at the foundation, remembers that the man walked in, took a quick look around and asked incredulously, "Is this it?" That visitor was blunter than most, but he wasn't too far off the mark. With almost no funding for the moment and the prospect of a planning process that takes years, Cedar Creek and Belle Grove National Historical Park in Virginia faces an uphill battle to become the information-packed site that many think it could be. "The transition of the creation of a national park is one of those things where it is definitely a slow process," said Sandy Rives, the Virginia director of the National Park Service and acting administrator for the new park until someone else is hired.
FEATURES
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | June 23, 1996
POTOMAC -- Art Mitchell is out here with a generator-powered hand drill on the first truly hot Saturday of spring, screwing 2-by-8-inch, rough-hewn rails onto 8-by-8 posts. 10: 45 a.m., even in the shade in the Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park, his face is beaded with perspiration, his T-shirt wet through.Mitchell, a statistician from Falls Church, Va., is working at Great Falls on a winding, 0.6-mile long walkway -- part boardwalk, part concrete-and-steel -- across adjoining Olmsted and Falls islands.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | June 12, 2006
And so Molly Welsh, an Englishwoman sentenced to indentured servitude in 17th-century Maryland, wed an African slave named Bannaka. And they begat four daughters, one of whom was named Mary. And Mary wed a slave named Robert, who took her last name, which, by the time of their nuptials, had become Bannaky. Mary and Robert begat one son and three daughters. One of the daughters, Jemima, wed Samuel D. Lett. From that union came eight children, including a son named Aquilla. "Aquilla Lett eventually moved to Ohio," Gwen Marable said Saturday afternoon.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2004
He was a pioneer. The first African-American scientist, Benjamin Banneker was a self-educated mathematician and astronomer. Born in 1731 near the Patapsco River in what is now Oella, Banneker lived and worked nearly his entire life in the area. He died in 1806. Since 1998, the Banneker Historical Park and Museum has occupied the land on which his family farm stood. This Saturday, the museum, which has aimed to preserve Banneker's legacy through educational exhibits and displays, will celebrate its sixth anniversary.
NEWS
By From staff reports | May 30, 2000
In Baltimore City Missing Dundalk man believed to have fallen into area waters An Edgemere man is missing and believed to have fallen into the waters between Fells Point and Back River during an early-morning boat trip Saturday headed for North Point Marina in Edgemere, investigators said yesterday. Craig Keuski, 23, of the 2900 block Sparrows Point Road traveled to Fells Point in his pickup and visited area bars with friends Friday night. About 2 a.m., Keuski boarded a private, 35-foot boat destined for North Point Marina, according to city police.
NEWS
By William L. Withuhn | March 2, 2007
President Theodore Roosevelt said, "The nation behaves well if it treats the natural resources as assets which it must turn over to the next generation increased, and not impaired in value." We have not behaved well as a nation with respect to some of our most treasured resources - our national parks. Decades of neglect have taken a heavy toll on them. However, thanks to the leadership of Interior Secretary Dirk Kempthorne and the Bush administration's recently announced National Parks Centennial Initiative - and with the faithful support of park champions in Congress, including Maryland's congressional delegation and thousands of national park visitors and advocates - we have an opportunity to remedy the situation.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | June 12, 2006
And so Molly Welsh, an Englishwoman sentenced to indentured servitude in 17th-century Maryland, wed an African slave named Bannaka. And they begat four daughters, one of whom was named Mary. And Mary wed a slave named Robert, who took her last name, which, by the time of their nuptials, had become Bannaky. Mary and Robert begat one son and three daughters. One of the daughters, Jemima, wed Samuel D. Lett. From that union came eight children, including a son named Aquilla. "Aquilla Lett eventually moved to Ohio," Gwen Marable said Saturday afternoon.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,SUN STAFF | July 14, 2005
Explore the natural world at a cultural landmark Saturdays through early August at the Benjamin Banneker Historical Park and Museum in Ellicott City. Beginning this Saturday, young visitors to the park and museum can take part in the Summer Saturday Nature Series. The program, geared to all ages and free of charge, provides visitors with an educational and fun exploration of nature, at a unique location. The museum, which celebrates the life and accomplishments of African-American scientist Marylander Benjamin Banneker, is situated on a 142-acre historical site.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2004
Nearly 40 years after it became a county park, the Patapsco Female Institute might be getting a face-lift. The Howard County Department of Recreation and Parks unveiled a plan last week for $1 million worth of improvements over three years at the historic park in Ellicott City, which includes the restored shell of a 19th- century girls' school. Supporters say a scarcity of parking spaces and portable toilets, and lack of areas protected from the weather, have hindered the site's ability to hold programs and attract visitors.
NEWS
By Aparna Balakrishnan and Aparna Balakrishnan,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2004
It's easy to forget how close noisy and bustling U.S. 40 is as visitors drive along narrow roads, approaching the idyllic area encircling the Benjamin Banneker Historical Park and Museum in Oella. The park and museum sit on a small portion of 142 acres tucked in the woods near Old Frederick Road in the historic mill town established in 1808, two years after Banneker's death. Opened in June 1998, the museum celebrates Baltimore County native Banneker, an African-American who was a self-taught scientist.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2004
He was a pioneer. The first African-American scientist, Benjamin Banneker was a self-educated mathematician and astronomer. Born in 1731 near the Patapsco River in what is now Oella, Banneker lived and worked nearly his entire life in the area. He died in 1806. Since 1998, the Banneker Historical Park and Museum has occupied the land on which his family farm stood. This Saturday, the museum, which has aimed to preserve Banneker's legacy through educational exhibits and displays, will celebrate its sixth anniversary.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Randi Kest | June 25, 1998
African-American exhibit"Amistad: The First Decade And Beyond," a traveling exhibition of African-American art and artifacts, is coming to the African American Museum in Philadelphia Wednesday to Oct. 31.On loan from the Amistad Foundation African-American Collection, this exhibit includes 63 objects from more than 300 years of black history. Some of the items being shown are the original liberation documents of former slaves Joshua Brown and Samuel Berry, Jim Crow signage from the 1920s directing "Colored People in the Rear," and Thomas Hovendon's photogravure of "John Brown's Last Moments Before Execution."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,SUN STAFF | July 14, 2005
Explore the natural world at a cultural landmark Saturdays through early August at the Benjamin Banneker Historical Park and Museum in Ellicott City. Beginning this Saturday, young visitors to the park and museum can take part in the Summer Saturday Nature Series. The program, geared to all ages and free of charge, provides visitors with an educational and fun exploration of nature, at a unique location. The museum, which celebrates the life and accomplishments of African-American scientist Marylander Benjamin Banneker, is situated on a 142-acre historical site.
NEWS
By Michael Hilt and Michael Hilt,SUN STAFF | May 9, 2004
The past is present and on duty at New Market, Va., and its watchwords are "where 257 cadets from the Virginia Military Institute made the difference between victory and defeat." "The heritage [of New Market] looms over VMI," explained Scott Harris, the New Market Battlefield State Historical Park director. The Civil War battle is ingrained in the mind of every cadet, and the school's identity is rooted in the response of its 257 cadets to the call to serve. Ten died and 45 were wounded in the fighting.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2004
When Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas challenged desk-bound journalists to walk the length of the C&O Canal 50 years ago, he sparked a crusade to save the dirt towpath from becoming an asphalt highway. Last weekend, 75 hikers set off to replicate the two-week hike from Cumberland to Georgetown, a part anniversary bash, part rallying cry. Now, as then, the towpath is in danger of losing its way. A report prepared by the National Parks Conservation Association reinforces that assessment, calling the towpath and its historic buildings "an American treasure in peril."
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