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By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | May 3, 1998
He didn't walk on the water. He didn't multiply the loaves and fishes. And he didn't change water into wine.These are the conclusions of the Jesus Seminar, a group of biblical scholars who garnered major media attention several years ago over their unorthodox method of voting on whether Jesus actually said the things attributed to him. The group's latest publication is likely to generate just as much controversy."
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NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | November 9, 2004
In Baltimore City 15-year-old jailed on murder charge indicted in 2nd killing A 15-year-old boy already jailed on a murder charge was indicted yesterday in a second, unrelated killing, prosecutors said. Nathaniel Sassafras had been charged with the May shooting of 22-year-old Jason Baughman, outside a West Baltimore convenience store, according to court documents. The new indictment alleges that Sassafras -- who lived in the 600 block of N. Dukeland St. -- killed 15-year-old Earl Rodney Monroe Jr. on June 26. The shooting in the 2600 block of Lauretta Ave. drew increased attention because Monroe had been arrested and set free from the state juvenile center 11 times in the 15 months before he was killed.
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NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | November 17, 2000
Many biblical theologians believe Jesus Christ's resurrection took place only in the minds of his followers. To that, the Rev. N. T. Wright says poppycock. Wright, one of the world's most respected biblical scholars, is scheduled to speak tonight on "Jesus' Resurrection and Christian Origins" at the Ecumenical Institute of Theology's 2000 Dunning Lecture. An Anglican priest who is dean of Lichfield Cathedral in England, Wright has written extensively about the historical Jesus and has been a vocal critic of the highly publicized debunking efforts of the Jesus Seminar, a group of scholars who say that much in the Gospels is either myth and symbol or can't be historically verified.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | February 28, 2004
At one point in Mel Gibson's The Passion of the Christ, the Roman prefect Pontius Pilate asks his wife: "What is truth?" As millions of people flock to the film's opening this week, many are asking a similar question: Is The Passion faithful to the Bible, or is it simply, as some critics suggest, "The Gospel According to Mel"? As with practically everything else surrounding this movie, it all depends on whom you ask. The Passion sticks fairly closely to the New Testament's four Gospels, even though they provide few details on Jesus' final hours.
NEWS
By Diane Scharper | April 12, 1998
During the Easter season, the drama unfolds as Jesus rises from the dead and appears to Mary Magdalene, and to Simon Peter, and to Thomas.Mary Magdalene had gone to the tomb where Jesus' body was placed after the crucifixion and found it empty. As she stood there, Jesus appeared and asked her, "Woman, why are you weeping? Whom are you looking for?"Not recognizing him, thinking perhaps he is the gardener, she says, "Sir, if you carried him away, tell me where you laid him and I will take him."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Craig Eisendrath and Craig Eisendrath,Special to the Sun | June 29, 2003
Recent scholarship on the New Testament puts virtually every fact in doubt concerning the life of Jesus. Where once "gospel truth" was the highest warrant for fact, the Gospels are now seen by many scholars as constructions rather than history, and the versions given us by Matthew, Mark, Luke and John only a few among many competing texts. Does the historicity of Jesus matter, or can belief find a different ground? In 1906, the great philosopher, organist and humanitarian Albert Schweitzer wrote his monumental The Quest of the Historical Jesus (Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998, $19.95)
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | November 9, 2004
In Baltimore City 15-year-old jailed on murder charge indicted in 2nd killing A 15-year-old boy already jailed on a murder charge was indicted yesterday in a second, unrelated killing, prosecutors said. Nathaniel Sassafras had been charged with the May shooting of 22-year-old Jason Baughman, outside a West Baltimore convenience store, according to court documents. The new indictment alleges that Sassafras -- who lived in the 600 block of N. Dukeland St. -- killed 15-year-old Earl Rodney Monroe Jr. on June 26. The shooting in the 2600 block of Lauretta Ave. drew increased attention because Monroe had been arrested and set free from the state juvenile center 11 times in the 15 months before he was killed.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | February 28, 2004
At one point in Mel Gibson's The Passion of the Christ, the Roman prefect Pontius Pilate asks his wife: "What is truth?" As millions of people flock to the film's opening this week, many are asking a similar question: Is The Passion faithful to the Bible, or is it simply, as some critics suggest, "The Gospel According to Mel"? As with practically everything else surrounding this movie, it all depends on whom you ask. The Passion sticks fairly closely to the New Testament's four Gospels, even though they provide few details on Jesus' final hours.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | February 25, 2004
IT IS MY TASK to advise parents on the suitability of the new film The Passion of the Christ for children. If you have a busy day planned, you can stop reading now. No. It is not suitable for children. Certainly not children under the age of 17. It has, after all, a well-deserved R rating for violence. But I wouldn't recommended the film to anybody's children, even if they are old enough to have children of their own. Mel Gibson's movie is about the unspeakable cruelty inflicted on a gentle prophet.
NEWS
By Lois Szymanski and Lois Szymanski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 11, 1996
WILLIAM WINCHESTER Elementary School will sponsor its annual fun fair at the school from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. According to PTA volunteer Kathi Esland, "This is the fourth year for Willie's Fabulous Fun Fair."The public is invited for a day of fun and carnival games with prizes. The fair includes a duck pond, tip the cat, golf, an obstacle course in the gym, a baseball wheel and a wet sponge toss where kids can nail their teacher with a sponge.Throughout the day the fair will feature face painting, sand art and a raffle of items donated by faculty and staff members.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Craig Eisendrath and Craig Eisendrath,Special to the Sun | June 29, 2003
Recent scholarship on the New Testament puts virtually every fact in doubt concerning the life of Jesus. Where once "gospel truth" was the highest warrant for fact, the Gospels are now seen by many scholars as constructions rather than history, and the versions given us by Matthew, Mark, Luke and John only a few among many competing texts. Does the historicity of Jesus matter, or can belief find a different ground? In 1906, the great philosopher, organist and humanitarian Albert Schweitzer wrote his monumental The Quest of the Historical Jesus (Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998, $19.95)
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | November 17, 2000
Many biblical theologians believe Jesus Christ's resurrection took place only in the minds of his followers. To that, the Rev. N. T. Wright says poppycock. Wright, one of the world's most respected biblical scholars, is scheduled to speak tonight on "Jesus' Resurrection and Christian Origins" at the Ecumenical Institute of Theology's 2000 Dunning Lecture. An Anglican priest who is dean of Lichfield Cathedral in England, Wright has written extensively about the historical Jesus and has been a vocal critic of the highly publicized debunking efforts of the Jesus Seminar, a group of scholars who say that much in the Gospels is either myth and symbol or can't be historically verified.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | May 3, 1998
He didn't walk on the water. He didn't multiply the loaves and fishes. And he didn't change water into wine.These are the conclusions of the Jesus Seminar, a group of biblical scholars who garnered major media attention several years ago over their unorthodox method of voting on whether Jesus actually said the things attributed to him. The group's latest publication is likely to generate just as much controversy."
NEWS
By Diane Scharper | April 12, 1998
During the Easter season, the drama unfolds as Jesus rises from the dead and appears to Mary Magdalene, and to Simon Peter, and to Thomas.Mary Magdalene had gone to the tomb where Jesus' body was placed after the crucifixion and found it empty. As she stood there, Jesus appeared and asked her, "Woman, why are you weeping? Whom are you looking for?"Not recognizing him, thinking perhaps he is the gardener, she says, "Sir, if you carried him away, tell me where you laid him and I will take him."
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 5, 1991
After six years of discussion and voting, the provocative Jesus Seminar has concluded that about 80 percent of the words attributed to Jesus in the Gospels probably were not his own.Virtually all of Jesus' words in the Gospel of John were voted down by scholars meeting in Sonoma, Calif., including a pulpit favorite, John 3:16 -- "For God so loved the world that he gave his only son."Formed in part to counteract literalist views of the Bible, the Jesus Seminar, a 200-member group of biblical scholars from all over the United States, has stirred controversy since its first meetings in 1985.
NEWS
By Arizona Republic | October 22, 1993
PHOENIX, Ariz. -- Phoenix may become known as the city that gave birth to the 21st-century Bible.Members of the Jesus Seminar, an international group of several hundred academic scholars, are meeting today through Sunday in Phoenix. The gathering, not open to the public, almost certainly will result in the publishing of a radically new New Testament, which the scholars have spent the past eight years LTC defining.The group's members have concluded that Jesus Christ only said about 20 percent of what is attributed to him in the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John.
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