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By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2013
Sujata Massey opened the door of her refrigerator and pulled out a curry made from pink potatoes and zucchini. It was the best way she could think of to demonstrate what's going on inside her head when she sits down to write a novel. "I'm an odd person," says Massey, who recently returned with her family to Baltimore after a six-year hiatus. "This is the kind of thing I make, and my kids are not excited by the look of it. If I make a hamburger, I make it with Indian spices. There will never be a tuna casserole in this house.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2013
Sujata Massey opened the door of her refrigerator and pulled out a curry made from pink potatoes and zucchini. It was the best way she could think of to demonstrate what's going on inside her head when she sits down to write a novel. "I'm an odd person," says Massey, who recently returned with her family to Baltimore after a six-year hiatus. "This is the kind of thing I make, and my kids are not excited by the look of it. If I make a hamburger, I make it with Indian spices. There will never be a tuna casserole in this house.
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NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,Sun Staff Writer | September 14, 1995
Lucia St. Clair Robson, a writer of historical fiction, hates it when people assume she's a romance novelist."When you're a woman and you write something like this, they say it's a romance," said Ms. Robson, 52, of Arnold. "They tend to be dismissive about it."Ms. Robson's writing skill and popularity cannot be ignored quite so easily. Hardcover copies of her fifth book, "Mary's Land," will hit the bookstores Tuesday. The novel describes the lives of two women -- one real, one fictional -- in Colonial Maryland.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | May 6, 2013
When it comes to books, I guess you could call me a voracious listener. I have been commuting about an hour to and from work for more than 30 years, and during that time I bet I've listened to a couple of thousand books. First on tape, now on compact discs. If you had to sit in traffic that long every day - and it is worst on a Friday in summer, when everyone is trying to cross the Bay Bridge - you'd listen to anything that might distract you, too. And I have delved into a wide range of titles, from history to historical fiction to murder mysteries to true crime.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | October 29, 2006
For an hour, visiting author Carolyn Reeder explained how she had crafted her latest work of young-adult historical fiction, The Secret Project Notebook. As seventh-graders at Folly Quarter Middle School listened attentively, she explained how she moved from original idea to finished product -- a book centering on the children of scientists working on the Manhattan Project. Her discussion was both a history lesson and a discussion of the yearlong process of creating her book. Using a slide show and peppering her talk with plenty of anecdotes, she told how she did her research and explained about oral histories.
FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV | September 28, 2012
Want to rub shoulders with authors from this weekend's Baltimore Book Festival ? Hotel Monaco Baltimore, 2 N. Charles St., is hosting a Mix and Mingle event, Friday from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. in the living room area of the boutique hotel. Authors include: Jennifer Armentrout (Romance), Catherine Asaro (Science Fiction), Megan Hart (Erotic Fiction), Cheryl Klam (Young Adult Romance), Sophie Perinot (Historical Fiction), Jeri Smith (Romance) and Hope Tarr (Romance).
NEWS
February 18, 2001
Balto. County chief honors pupils for reading project REISTERSTOWN - Baltimore County School Superintendent Joe Hairston honored readers at Reisterstown Elementary School on Thursday for their participation in the school's "Make Time for Reading" program. School officials said the entire school of 532 children took part in what organizers called a read-around-the-clock project, logging a total of at least 24 hours of reading each since November. Top readers and their parents had the opportunity to attend a reception at the Hilton Garden Inn in Owings Mills, which is a business partner with the school.
NEWS
March 25, 2001
Editor's Note: Today Jerdine Nolen resuscitates Maryland's female historical figures. For children, reading about the lives of famous people can be a good bridge between historical fiction and informational books. Biographies can breathe life into historical facts and dates. March is Women's History Month, so it is an excellent time to read biographies about famous women. The Maryland State Department of Education's Women's History Project exists to make us all aware of the contributions of diverse women throughout our state's history, in the hope that it would inspire present-day dreams and future accomplishments.
NEWS
September 4, 2003
An interview with Carol Fritts, coordinator for the Library Media Specialists Book Club. How was this club formed? As media specialists, we like to discuss all types of books, but we don't get the chance to do adult books. When we do get together formally for work, we always talk about children's books. Because the media specialist is a unique position in the school, it can be kind of isolating. This club is an opportunity to meet with people who understand what you do and share a passion for reading.
NEWS
By ANNE WERPS | August 26, 1993
In a 1982 decision, Pico v. Island Trees, the Supreme Court ruled that ''local school boards cannot ban books from school libraries merely because they dislike the ideas expressed in them.''Steven Pico, the plaintiff in the case, spoke a few years ago at a conference of the Missouri Association of School Librarians. He said, ''Over and over again, the facts in these incidents are the same: The books are not read in their entirety, . . . the opinions of professionals are ignored, the attitudes of students are never sought and those who disagree are ostracized or forced to leave.
FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV | September 28, 2012
Want to rub shoulders with authors from this weekend's Baltimore Book Festival ? Hotel Monaco Baltimore, 2 N. Charles St., is hosting a Mix and Mingle event, Friday from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. in the living room area of the boutique hotel. Authors include: Jennifer Armentrout (Romance), Catherine Asaro (Science Fiction), Megan Hart (Erotic Fiction), Cheryl Klam (Young Adult Romance), Sophie Perinot (Historical Fiction), Jeri Smith (Romance) and Hope Tarr (Romance).
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2010
The Baltimore Sun Novelist Elizabeth Kostova is fascinated by the way poem, a musical score, and especially a painting, swiftly and neatly severs the past from the present. "I've always been struck by what a glimpse of the past every painting is," she says. "Even contemporary paintings already are historical artifacts. There's something eerie about standing in front of a painting and looking at a portrayal of human life. This really happened, there is only one interpretation of it, and it's caught forever."
NEWS
By Marion Winik and Marion Winik,Los Angeles Times | August 26, 2007
Loving Frank Nancy Horan Ballantine Books / 384 pages / $23.95 If the true events on which Loving Frank is based were as well known as the Wizard of Oz story, Nancy Horan's novel would be its Wicked - the retelling of a tale about a villainess who is really a heroine following the dictates of her heart at any cost. Like Gregory Maguire's story about L. Frank Baum's character the Wicked Witch of the West, Loving Frank argues that the issue is not good versus evil but true morality versus conformism - though real evil does make a dramatic appearance.
NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to The Sun | June 17, 2007
Ghostwalk By Rebecca Stott The New Yorkers By Cathleen Schine Farrar Straus Giroux/Sarah Crichton Books / 304 pages / $24 The world is composed of cat people and dog people and they know who they are. The urban landscape is rife with dog owners and their pets; dogs often appear to be the mortar that keeps an otherwise alienated and aloof citizenry connected. In Cathleen Schine's sharp, poignant and witty new novel, one might well ask, "Who let the dogs out?" On a tidy and tony little block off Central Park, in the great dog-eat-dog world of uptown Manhattan, people move in and out of their urban anomie led by their pooches, who seem to have a far keener sense of the necessity for human (and canine)
NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to the Sun | December 10, 2006
The Weight of Smoke: A Novel of the Jamestown Colony George Robert Minkoff McPherson & Company / 392 pages / $24.95 One of the most compelling stories of early Colonial American history is that of the establishment of the Jamestown Colony. On May 14, 1607, the Virginia Company explorers, funded by a charter by King James I of England, landed on Jamestown Island. They were there to establish an English colony on the banks of the James River, in what is now Virginia, and settle the New World - and mine its untold riches - for England.
NEWS
By Judith M. Redding and Judith M. Redding,Special to the Sun | November 26, 2006
Ines of My Soul Isabel Allende (Translated from the Spanish by Margaret Sayers Peden) HarperCollins / 322 pages / $25.95. "Behind every great man is a great woman" is an oft-repeated American axiom, and yet our founding mothers are remembered best for being wives of the founding fathers. Martha Washington inherited her husband's "Household and Kitchen Furniture, of every sort and kind, with the Liquors and Groceries which may be on hand at the time of my decease" - and is virtually unknown to Americans.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | November 10, 1997
Which child dies in the human chess game in the palace in Istamboul?If you're already a fan of Scottish writer Dorothy Dunnett, you might expect that to be the most-asked question about her series of six historical novels featuring 16th-century adventurer Francis Crawford of Lymond.If you're not familiar with this prolific writer's work -- 21 novels in 36 years -- you might wonder why on Earth hundreds of thousands of readers around the world either haven't figured out the answer yet, or believe they have and want to go over it again and again in discussion groups, in the mail and across the Internet.
ENTERTAINMENT
By JOE GROSSBERG and JOE GROSSBERG,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | April 9, 1998
Have you ever read a novel so engaging that you actually pictured yourself in it? Well, dress like a character in one of science fiction writer Harry Turtledove's works, and you just might win the chance to enjoy breakfast with the guest of honor at Balticon 32, one of the area's largest annual science-fiction conventions.It was over a breakfast of bacon and eggs that Turtledove came up with the idea for one of his quirkier short stories. As he recalls, "I thought, 'This tastes good. I wish to heaven it was kosher.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | October 29, 2006
For an hour, visiting author Carolyn Reeder explained how she had crafted her latest work of young-adult historical fiction, The Secret Project Notebook. As seventh-graders at Folly Quarter Middle School listened attentively, she explained how she moved from original idea to finished product -- a book centering on the children of scientists working on the Manhattan Project. Her discussion was both a history lesson and a discussion of the yearlong process of creating her book. Using a slide show and peppering her talk with plenty of anecdotes, she told how she did her research and explained about oral histories.
NEWS
By Nicholas A. Basbanes and Nicholas A. Basbanes,Special to the Sun | October 8, 2006
Imperium: A Novel of Ancient Rome Robert Harris Simon & Schuster / 310 pages / $26 The mark of a superior historical novel is not always an erudite rendering of the recorded past, but what the author imagines could have happened within the framework of the known. Put in other words, it is the "what if" factor that often makes for a compelling story, a skill that has been mastered by the British novelist Robert Harris, a onetime correspondent for the BBC and a former political columnist for the London Sunday Times and Daily Telegraph.
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