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Historical Electronics Museum

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ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | April 11, 1999
Mission: To educate visitors on the history of defense and commercial electronics of the past century through exhibition and interpretation of artifacts and documents related to electronics technology. Museum visitors can listen to an Edison cylinder player belt out tunes from the early 1900s; send a Morse message; watch the first automatic tracking and gunfire control radar, the SCR-270, rotate as it did on the morning of Dec. 7, 1941, when it detected the enemy just before the attack on Pearl Harbor; and learn about advancements in electronics.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | November 19, 2007
A 22-foot German radar antenna, once used by Nazi forces to track Allied bombers in Europe during World War II, found a new home yesterday in Linthicum, the latest exhibit at the Historical Electronics Museum. In a cold breeze, a handful of museum members and staff grinned and snapped pictures as a crew of four professional aircraft movers unloaded sections of the "Wurzburg Riese" (Giant Wurzburg) dish antenna from two flatbed trailers after a two-day drive from Omaha, Neb. "It's in good shape," said Ralph Strong, a 1991 Westinghouse retiree and former president of the museum's board of directors.
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NEWS
May 22, 1991
The Northern Anne Arundel County Chamber of Commerce will sponsor a "Business After Hours" gathering from 6 to 8 p.m. May 23 at the Westinghouse Historical Electronics Museum, 920 Elkridge Landing Road, Linthicum.The evening will feature cocktails and hors d'oeuvres catered by the Rose Restaurant, and guided tours of the museum will be conducted.Admission is $6 in advance and $10 at the door. Information: 766-8282.
ENTERTAINMENT
By GENA R. CHATTIN | April 26, 2007
PRIVATEER DAY Avast, ye! Saturday is Privateer Day in Fells Point. Dig out your pirate duds and prepare to be press-ganged into the pirate invasion. Landlubbers of all ages can pretend to be privateers, pirates, wenches or whatever strikes their fancy. The Clipper City tall ship and the schooner Farewell both will be docked at Broadway Pier. Younger buccaneers can learn about shipbuilding and sailing, hear pirate stories and hunt for treasure on Broadway Square. The Brigands, Pirates for Sail and the House of Cadarn will perform period music, and the pirate-enthusiast group Pyrate Invasion will, yes, invade Fells Point in the afternoon wearing pirate garb.
NEWS
July 27, 2004
On July 20, 2004, HAROLD M. WATSON; beloved father of Linda Watson Spittel and husband Charles of Wilmington, NC. and Janice Watson Grim and husband Richard of Catonsville, MD; grandfather of Dori Tempio, Kristin Thompson and Amanda Spittel, brother of Roy H. Watson of Lakewood, CO. Memorial Service will be held Friday, July 30 at 11 A.M. at Catonsville Presbyterian Church, 1400 Frederick Road, Catonsville, MD. Memorials may be made to the Historical Electronics...
NEWS
June 9, 2003
Security at BWI to be discussed during exhibition Speakers from Baltimore-Washington International Airport's information technology department will address the sixth annual E-Gov 2003 Conference and Exposition, scheduled for Wednesday at the Washington Convention Center. The topic will be security-related technology in use at BWI and around the world, including vehicle-screening systems and electronic baggage screening. AACC president to speak at business breakfast BWI Business Partnership will hold a Spirit of Success breakfast meeting at 7:45 a.m. June 18 at the Historical Electronics Museum, 1745 W. Nursery Road.
NEWS
December 3, 2000
The Historical Electronics Museum in Linthicum has announced the establishment of the Robert L. Dwight Science Scholarship, in honor of the museum's founder, who lives on Gibson Island. The scholarship was announced at a recent reception celebrating the 20th anniversary of the museum at 1745 West Nursery Road. Details on the annual award of at least $1,500, which will go to a high school senior taking up studies in science and engineering at an accredited college or university, are to be announced next year, said the museum board's president, Allan L. Spencer.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | November 19, 2007
A 22-foot German radar antenna, once used by Nazi forces to track Allied bombers in Europe during World War II, found a new home yesterday in Linthicum, the latest exhibit at the Historical Electronics Museum. In a cold breeze, a handful of museum members and staff grinned and snapped pictures as a crew of four professional aircraft movers unloaded sections of the "Wurzburg Riese" (Giant Wurzburg) dish antenna from two flatbed trailers after a two-day drive from Omaha, Neb. "It's in good shape," said Ralph Strong, a 1991 Westinghouse retiree and former president of the museum's board of directors.
NEWS
By LARRY WILLIAMS | January 15, 2006
A museum whose collection took billions of dollars to produce but which has relatively few visitors is tucked within the aerospace-industrial sprawl that surrounds Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport. The museum isn't filled with Monets or Picassos but rather an extraordinary array of electronic equipment ranging from massive antennas that squat on the grass outside to rows of black boxes that line the interior aisles. It's the Historical Electronics Museum, and it's jammed with mostly military radios, radar, sonar, sensors and other electronic devices, many of which were invented by scientists and engineers who worked in the nearby facilities of defense contractors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By GENA R. CHATTIN | April 26, 2007
PRIVATEER DAY Avast, ye! Saturday is Privateer Day in Fells Point. Dig out your pirate duds and prepare to be press-ganged into the pirate invasion. Landlubbers of all ages can pretend to be privateers, pirates, wenches or whatever strikes their fancy. The Clipper City tall ship and the schooner Farewell both will be docked at Broadway Pier. Younger buccaneers can learn about shipbuilding and sailing, hear pirate stories and hunt for treasure on Broadway Square. The Brigands, Pirates for Sail and the House of Cadarn will perform period music, and the pirate-enthusiast group Pyrate Invasion will, yes, invade Fells Point in the afternoon wearing pirate garb.
NEWS
By LARRY WILLIAMS | January 15, 2006
A museum whose collection took billions of dollars to produce but which has relatively few visitors is tucked within the aerospace-industrial sprawl that surrounds Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport. The museum isn't filled with Monets or Picassos but rather an extraordinary array of electronic equipment ranging from massive antennas that squat on the grass outside to rows of black boxes that line the interior aisles. It's the Historical Electronics Museum, and it's jammed with mostly military radios, radar, sonar, sensors and other electronic devices, many of which were invented by scientists and engineers who worked in the nearby facilities of defense contractors.
NEWS
July 27, 2004
On July 20, 2004, HAROLD M. WATSON; beloved father of Linda Watson Spittel and husband Charles of Wilmington, NC. and Janice Watson Grim and husband Richard of Catonsville, MD; grandfather of Dori Tempio, Kristin Thompson and Amanda Spittel, brother of Roy H. Watson of Lakewood, CO. Memorial Service will be held Friday, July 30 at 11 A.M. at Catonsville Presbyterian Church, 1400 Frederick Road, Catonsville, MD. Memorials may be made to the Historical Electronics...
NEWS
By Lisa Wiseman and Lisa Wiseman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 16, 2004
The Maryland State House in Annapolis is not only the site of the state capital, it was the nation's capital from November 1783 to August 1784. It is the oldest state capital building in the United States in continuous legislative use and was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1960. The building's original Senate Chamber was where George Washington resigned his commission and where Congress ratified the Treaty of Paris. Over the years, the building has had several additions and renovations, including a recent restoration of the original wooden dome.
NEWS
June 9, 2003
Security at BWI to be discussed during exhibition Speakers from Baltimore-Washington International Airport's information technology department will address the sixth annual E-Gov 2003 Conference and Exposition, scheduled for Wednesday at the Washington Convention Center. The topic will be security-related technology in use at BWI and around the world, including vehicle-screening systems and electronic baggage screening. AACC president to speak at business breakfast BWI Business Partnership will hold a Spirit of Success breakfast meeting at 7:45 a.m. June 18 at the Historical Electronics Museum, 1745 W. Nursery Road.
NEWS
December 3, 2000
The Historical Electronics Museum in Linthicum has announced the establishment of the Robert L. Dwight Science Scholarship, in honor of the museum's founder, who lives on Gibson Island. The scholarship was announced at a recent reception celebrating the 20th anniversary of the museum at 1745 West Nursery Road. Details on the annual award of at least $1,500, which will go to a high school senior taking up studies in science and engineering at an accredited college or university, are to be announced next year, said the museum board's president, Allan L. Spencer.
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 9, 2000
A NEW EXHIBIT has been added at the Historical Electronics Museum in Linthicum, thanks in part to some Old Crows. Through the combined efforts of the Chesapeake Bay Roost of the Association of Old Crows (a group that takes its name from a World War II program known as Project Raven), the U.S. Logistic Command and several Air Force officers, the museum has been able to assemble and display an AN/APR-38 Warning and Control System. AN/APR-38 is the standard designation for Army Navy/Airborne Passive Receiver -- and it is a nice addition to a museum dedicated to the preservation and display of electronic technology, with an emphasis on radar, encoding equipment and communications.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1995
Sure, you can go the traditional route and take in the Baltimore Museum of Art or the Maryland Historical Society or the Walters Art Gallery, but why not head off the beaten museum path and check out something really different? Here are some options:B. Olive Cole Pharmacy Museum, 650 W. Lombard St. Hours: by appointment. Free. Phone: (410) 727-0746. Named for one of the first female graduates of the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, the facility includes a replica of a 1900 vintage pharmacy and a variety of rare objects, including apothecary jars, mortars and pestles and root grinders.
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 9, 2000
A NEW EXHIBIT has been added at the Historical Electronics Museum in Linthicum, thanks in part to some Old Crows. Through the combined efforts of the Chesapeake Bay Roost of the Association of Old Crows (a group that takes its name from a World War II program known as Project Raven), the U.S. Logistic Command and several Air Force officers, the museum has been able to assemble and display an AN/APR-38 Warning and Control System. AN/APR-38 is the standard designation for Army Navy/Airborne Passive Receiver -- and it is a nice addition to a museum dedicated to the preservation and display of electronic technology, with an emphasis on radar, encoding equipment and communications.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | April 11, 1999
Mission: To educate visitors on the history of defense and commercial electronics of the past century through exhibition and interpretation of artifacts and documents related to electronics technology. Museum visitors can listen to an Edison cylinder player belt out tunes from the early 1900s; send a Morse message; watch the first automatic tracking and gunfire control radar, the SCR-270, rotate as it did on the morning of Dec. 7, 1941, when it detected the enemy just before the attack on Pearl Harbor; and learn about advancements in electronics.
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