Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHistoric Structures
IN THE NEWS

Historic Structures

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Sam Howe Verhovek and Sam Howe Verhovek,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 19, 2006
KAILUA-KONA, Hawaii -- Resorts, airports and much else about Hawaiian island life were back to normal this week, days after a magnitude-6.7 earthquake struck just off Hawaii Island. But for some of the Big Island's most historic - and fragile - structures, the quake's effects were not so quickly overcome. "We didn't fare well at all," said Fanny AuHoy, administrator of the two-story Hulihe'e Palace, built of coral, lava rock and native wood in 1838 for the Hawaiian royal family. "This building has withstood other earthquakes, hurricanes and big storms.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2013
Maryland officials agreed Wednesday to buy the historic Annapolis post office building from the U.S. Postal Service for use as part of the government complex surrounding the State House. Without dissent, the three-member Board of Public Works agreed to pay $3.2 million for the 13,000-square-foot building on Church Circle. Built in 1901, the structure is listed on the Maryland Historical Trust inventory of historic properties. Under the deal, the state will lease space back to the Postal Service to continue services for eight to 20 months until it relocates.
Advertisement
NEWS
By ANDREA F. SIEGEL and ANDREA F. SIEGEL,SUN REPORTER | December 4, 2005
To douse the five-alarm fire on Annapolis' historic Main Street last weekend, firefighters had to drag 300 feet of hose and stand on nearby buildings to spray water into a store blocked in on three sides by other structures. They returned the next day to look for a better way to fight a future fire. They found that if they maneuvered a new fire engine just the right way, they could get into a skinny alley, much closer to the older buildings that line Main Street. The charm of narrow streets and tightly nestled buildings is the bread and butter of the tourist trade in Annapolis' downtown Historic District.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun and By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2013
Before it became "The Wall That Ate Some Cars," it was just a stone wall on Mulligans Hill Lane, bracing a 20-foot-high embankment - stalwart as the steep hills that give Ellicott City's historic district much of its character. Then in early September 2011 came the rains of Tropical Storm Lee, and in the dead of night a section of the wall that had stood since before the Civil War collapsed. Six cars parked along the wall were crushed or damaged. Parking spaces vanished under tons of stone quickly trucked in to shore up the embankment.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 13, 2005
MOSCOW - Alexei A. Klimenko, sitting in a car rolling down the tree-lined Bolshaya Ordinka Street just a few blocks south of the Kremlin, points with contempt at what appears to be a line of charming early 19th-century houses. "This is a fake building," he says, wagging an index finger at a chrome-yellow structure. "That is a fake building. And all of these here? Demolished and totally reconstructed!" As an architectural historian and one of the city's leading preservationists, Klimenko, 62, is a charming prophet of doom.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | January 28, 1999
Baltimore County Council members are proposing a bill to protect structures from demolition while the buildings are being considered for the county's historic register.Council Chairman Kevin B. Kamenetz, a Democrat representing the Pikesville-Liberty Road corridor, said this week that the measure he is co-sponsoring would prevent properties from being bulldozed or altered while county officials decide whether to list them on the register.The measure, discussed at a council work session Tuesday, follows a series of actions that have angered preservationists, including the razing of historic structures and the elimination of resident appeals to the county Board of Appeals of any changes to county-owned historic structures.
NEWS
June 8, 2003
Harford Community College will offer a new program - Building Preservation and Restoration - beginning in the fall. The Building Preservation and Restoration program leads to the A.A.S. degree in Technical/Professional Studies and will focus on how to research, investigate, evaluate and carry out restoration and maintenance on historic structures. Emphasis is placed on the use of theory and practice to solve preservation issues and problems. Vital to the program are conservation, sustainability, technique and treatment of historic structures.
NEWS
October 27, 1999
HISTORIC structures are increasingly an endangered species in Baltimore County. Add the recent loss of the Thomas Fortune House, a 145-year-old stone Greek Revival-style stone house in Cockeysville, to the Samuel Owings House in Owings Mills and the Maryvale Tenant House in Green Spring Valley to the list of significant structures that have been cavalierly demolished in the past few years.At the moment, no one is taking responsibility for destroying the house in Cockeysville, but the circumstances are suspicious.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | December 16, 1997
Baltimore County officials have halted the renovation of several historic buildings at the controversial Hayfields golf community after learning that permits were issued without the approval of the Landmarks Preservation Commission.Yesterday, county officials blamed clerical oversights for the improper issuance of four building permits on three occasions.The errors came to light late last week as developer John Mangione briefed the commission on the project in Hunt Valley. After being contacted by county officials yesterday, he agreed to stop work until he could seek approval from the commission today.
NEWS
By Michael J. Clark and Michael J. Clark,Howard County Bureau of The Sun | January 6, 1991
Expressing concern over the loss of local landmarks, Howard County Executive Charles I. Ecker said Friday that his administration would prepare legislation aimed at preserving historic sites.Mr. Ecker has asked Alice Ann Wetzel, the county's historic preservation planner, to draft legislative proposals, which will be reviewed by various community groups before they are ready for introduction in midyear.The executive is picking up an initiative undertaken two years ago by his predecessor, Elizabeth Bobo.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2012
Baltimore's 200-year-old Basilica of the Assumption, the first cathedral in America, will be closed to many visitors over eight months as crews repair domes damaged in August's earthquake, church officials said Thursday. Repairs could cost up to $5 million and extend into next year, officials said. But the extent of the damage will remain unknown until crews can reach the cracks and test them. It is nearly 100 feet to the top of the main dome. A preliminary review suggests that the damage is limited to restored plaster that was part of the nearly $40 million renovation completed six years ago, and is not structural, said archdiocese spokesman Sean Caine.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2011
The centuries-old church affectionately known as "Old Brick" is far from imposing. It more closely resembles a one-room schoolhouse than it does the newer, larger building that has housed its congregation since the 1990s. Yet Old Brick's historic role as a witness to the development of Howard County and Columbia looms large in the hearts of many, and has inspired its congregation at Christ Episcopal Church to restore the red-brick building on what is now Oakland Mills Road to a close facsimile of its original.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2011
During frequent day trips decades ago to the Amish markets of Lancaster, Pa., Jim Smedley became increasingly curious about the barn-like structures that span many rivers across the town's picturesque countryside, so he started learning more. Howard County was once home to eight of these covered bridges, some more than 160 years old, Smedley's research shows. Two were located in Daniels, a town some people may never have heard of, and which was previously known as Alberton, and before that as Elysville.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,sun Reporter | August 3, 2008
Betty Callahan arrived at her Hampden church before firefighters did early yesterday morning, only to see "fire tongues" licking the base of the steeple and then engulfing the 130-year-old bell tower and slate roof in flames. Minutes later, about 6:30 a.m, firefighters were dousing Mount Vernon United Methodist Church at 801 W. 33rd St., as evacuated neighbors looked on in the gray dawn. "It looked like Niagara Falls," said Callahan, the church's lay leader and treasurer, of the water shooting from the 15 fire engines called to the scene.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,sun reporter | May 16, 2007
The two-story stone walls and arched windows of a 100-year-old seminary building stand out architecturally amid Terra Maria's decade-old, closely spaced single-family homes, but emotionally it is an integral part of the Ellicott City development. "It is one of the focal points of the neighborhood," said Randy Citrano, treasurer of the Terra Maria homeowners association. "A lot of people know our neighborhood from this structure." Like many historic structures in the county, weather, use and time have taken a toll on the roofless ruins off Route 144, which were once the social hall of St. Charles College.
NEWS
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,[Sun Reporter] | December 3, 2006
MOUNT VERNON, VA. In a pasture beside George Washington's estate here, Hogg Island sheep grazed on a recent fall day, forming a tableau that would have looked familiar to the first president. Beneath that field, however, the scene was much more 21st-century: A new orientation center and museum, designed to avoid disturbing the 18th-century landscape, was full of visitors checking out the latest in computerized historical displays. Architects had virtually no choice but to tuck most of the new 67,000-square-foot building out of sight -- namely, below ground -- so as not to mar the experience of visitors to the mansion, which looks as it did in 1799 when Washington died.
NEWS
August 10, 2003
Harford Community College is offering a new program, Building Preservation and Restoration, which will prepare students for a career in historic preservation. The Building Preservation and Restoration program, being offered in the fall semester, leads to the Associate of Applied Sciences degree in Technical/Professional Studies and will focus upon the proper ways to research, investigate, evaluate and carry out restoration and maintenance on historic structures. Emphasis is placed on the use of theory and practice to address preservation issues and problems such as conservation, sustainability, technique and treatment of historic structures.
NEWS
August 28, 1996
THE RENEWED FOCUS on the Civil War history of northern Baltimore County's Hayfields farm does not really add to, or change, the issues surrounding plans for a golf course on the 475-acre tract. Hayfields was a historically significant property before a Pulitzer Prize-winning Princeton historian recently suggested a study of the site. More important, its fate has always been crucial to the valleys because its development could spawn a domino effect (though the fact that public water and sewer would not be extended to the golf course makes that possibility somewhat less threatening)
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | October 26, 2006
The latest players in the long-suffering effort to redevelop Fells Point's landmark Recreation Pier intend to convert the historic structure into a chic hotel. Developer J. Joseph Clarke, tossing aside his second partner in the project after only a couple of months, announced yesterday that he will be working with Baltimore's H&S Properties Inc., the company behind the thriving Harbor East complex. The team has arranged to turn the property, nationally recognized since its use as a police station on NBC's Homicide: Life on the Street, into an Aloft hotel, a less expensive version of the W Hotel brand.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.