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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2014
The streets around City Dock in Annapolis flooded again Friday, closing the Spa Creek Bridge connecting the Eastport neighborhood with downtown for several hours. It was yet another reminder to Lisa Craig that she's in a race against time to protect one of Maryland's oldest communities from the rising waters of the Chesapeake Bay. "We've probably doubled the number of nuisance flooding events in the past several years," said Craig, director of historic preservation for the city of Annapolis.
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By Carrie Wells and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
The tiny brass ring bearing the initials "CC" presents a mystery: Did it belong to Charles Calvert, the third Baron Baltimore? And can the St. Mary's College of Maryland archaeologists who unearthed it ever prove its origins? The archaeologists discovered the ring this summer at a dig at a Charles County site that was a refuge for Piscataway Indians who were pushed from their homelands by other tribes and the arrival of European settlers in the 1600s. The small ring, perhaps designed to be worn on a pinkie finger, might have been a signet ring used to seal documents, said Julia King, the St. Mary's professor who oversaw the dig. King believes the ring might have been used by a representative of Charles Calvert to conduct diplomatic relations with the Piscataway tribe.
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NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,Sun Staff Writer | June 9, 1995
Local historians and officials want to broaden the reach of rules aimed at protecting historic sites in Howard County and offer a tax incentive for restoration efforts.The County Council is developing legislation to provide a property tax break for people who maintain or preserve old buildings, proposals that may be introduced in September, County Executive Charles I. Ecker said this week.But the Howard County Historic District Commission board plans to send a letter to Mr. Ecker and the council next week requesting protection for historic buildings not in the county's historic districts.
NEWS
September 11, 2014
While Maryland is going to great lengths to commemorate the Fort McHenry battle from the War of 1812, little effort has gone into acknowledging several Savage residents: Commodore Joshua Barney in the Battle of Bladensburg or his son-in-law, Nathanial F. Williams, in the Battle of North Point. The Williams family developed what we know today as the Savage Mill, a cotton mill that allowed our ship industry to continue when the English ransomed our fledgling country's critical resource.
NEWS
By Noam Neusner | March 11, 1991
In its March 11 editions, The Sun reported incorrectly that the Howard County Board of Appeals had given the South Columbia Baptist Church permission to raze Moundland, a historic house. In fact, the congregation received permission to build a new church. It did not need the board's permission to raze the historic house on its property.The Sun regrets the error.Can a phone booth have historic value?Not usually, but when it was used to coordinate the cover-up of the Watergate scandal, you might expect someone to keep an eye on it. But the phone booth has disappeared from its once-famous perch on Route 355 in Rockville, and no one knows why.With it went a piece of Maryland's ephemeral history, perhaps trivial but noteworthy.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Sun Staff Writer | October 31, 1994
Think of historic sites in Howard County, and pre-Civil War-era homes in Elkridge and the 172-year-old Savage Mill come to mind.But last week a 1921 prefabricated house in Ellicott City joined the more than 600 historic homes, bridges and monuments on the county's historic sites list."
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff writer | November 6, 1990
O. James Lighthizer finds a particular thrill in Tulip Hill, the 18th-century mansion off Muddy Creek Road. In the county executive's opinion, the Georgian brick building with the two arched chimneys is "the most magnificent building in Anne Arundel County. That's my favorite."It's tops in his book, which in this case happens to be "Anne Arundel's Legacy -- The Historic Properties of Anne Arundel County." It was written and researched by Donna M. Ware, the county's historic sites planner, but in many ways it is Lighthizer's book.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | March 15, 2000
After an eight-month review of its new master plan for managing Carroll County's growth, the county commissioners weakened provisions yesterday for directing growth to the county's eight towns and Finksburg, and eliminated all of the planning policies drafted during two years of discussions. The commissioners' latest revision of the plan -- which would set the first new development guidelines since 1964 -- also ruled out a ban on new billboards and weakened programs for protecting the county's historic sites.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Sun Staff Writer | April 10, 1995
Before Historic Ellicott City Inc. saved it, the B&O Railroad Station Museum was an abandoned, run-down relic slated for destruction by railroad officials.Now, the 165-year-old station is a repository of railroad artifacts and Civil War memorabilia, drawing model train enthusiasts and history buffs from all over the world.Last week, the historic preservation group touted the museum as one of its successes at a 20th-anniversary party. (Although the group was formed 23 years ago, members are just now celebrating the 20th anniversary.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | October 5, 1998
Hoping to enhance the natural beauty of the Patapsco Valley, a grass-roots organization will unveil three plans today for a trail network that would span historic sites in Baltimore and Howard counties, using the Patapsco River as a centerpiece.The project by the Patapsco Heritage Greenway Committee would take about 10 years to complete and is designed to link existing hiking and bicycle trails that meander through Oella, Ellicott City and Catonsville.It would form a living classroom highlighted by landmarks such as the Thomas Viaduct in Relay and remains of rustic textile and flour mills.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2014
The streets around City Dock in Annapolis flooded again Friday, closing the Spa Creek Bridge connecting the Eastport neighborhood with downtown for several hours. It was yet another reminder to Lisa Craig that she's in a race against time to protect one of Maryland's oldest communities from the rising waters of the Chesapeake Bay. "We've probably doubled the number of nuisance flooding events in the past several years," said Craig, director of historic preservation for the city of Annapolis.
EXPLORE
Editorial from The Record | May 9, 2013
Havre de Grace was able to pull together a respectable version of its Lafayette Trail, just in time for the bicentennial celebration of a British sacking of the city during the War of 1812. The trail is named for Marie Joseph Paul Yves Roche Gilbert du Motie, a French military advisor sent by the French crown, who became a hero of the American Revolution, then returned to his native land and became a hero of the French Revolution. Possibly because his name is a bit a mouthful, he is better known by his title, the Marquis de Lafayette.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2013
Sharon Boston, media relations manager at University of Maryland Medical Center, normally spends her days fielding requests from the media. But when it comes to weekends and vacations, it's a safe bet that she's on the road, traveling to visit homes once occupied by presidents, writers and other historic personages. Boston cheerfully bills these perambulations that she began in 2001 - some right here in her own backyard - "Nerd Trips. " She also writes an illustrated blog she fittingly calls, "Nerd Trips!
EXPLORE
By Janet Kusterer | October 11, 2012
Out and About At this beautiful time of year you don't need any special reason to visit the historic district. On the weekends the historic sites - the Thomas Isaac Log Cabin, the Firehouse Museum, the Heritage Orientation Center and the Patapsco Female Institute Historic Park - are all open to visitors. Lots of shops have samples of their wares out on the sidewalk, and a few restaurants offer outdoor seating. Grab an ice cream cone and sit on a picnic bench next to the Tiber.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2012
When Maryland Public Television debuts "The Heart of the Civil War" on Sept. 11, it will showcase many Carroll County sites. The hour-long documentary features areas like Westminster and Uniontown and battlefields that were critical to both sides in the war between the states. The film includes footage of the most crucial territories where Confederate and Union forces battled for strategic advantage in Carroll, Frederick and Washington counties. The story focuses on Maryland residents enmeshed in the famous battles, whose sites still draw hundreds of tourists annually.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2012
Dorothy Powell Ridgely Thomas, a former teacher of disabled students who was active at the Hampton National Historic Site, died of complications from Parkinson's disease Aug. 4 at her Lutherville home. She was 82. Born Dorothy Powell Ridgely in Baltimore, she was the daughter of D. Stewart Ridgely and the former Dorothy Powell. Her father was in the last generation of his family to be born at Hampton, the Baltimore County landmark. Mrs. Thomas was a descendant of Charles Carnan Ridgely, Maryland's governor from 1816 to 1819.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Holly Selby and Gerard Shields and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | April 12, 1998
Baltimore's announcement last week that it will turn over some of its most historic sites to private operators sounded familiar to heritage consultant Peggy Fiori.A decade ago, the wife of Maryland Historical Society Director Dennis Fiori worked for a Boston-based preservation group that faced similar struggles. Nowhere do historic homes emerge and fade more frequently than in the land of the Pilgrims.The Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities now maintains 60 historical properties in five states.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 5, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Central High School in Little Rock, Ark., where in 1957 federal troops were ordered to help nine black students integrate the student body, has been recognized as one of the nation's 12 most endangered historic sites by a leading preservationist group.The dramatic newsreel footage of Elizabeth Eckford, a solitary black girl arriving for her first day of class only to be surrounded by jeering white classmates, has stood the test of time. The image, a melange of black and white, hostility and hope, has been burned into the American psyche.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2012
On a grassy hill a mile west of the Patuxent River, historian Ralph Eshelman can see the same bucolic view of fields and placid water anxious British soldiers likely saw when they landed in the summer of 1814 — the first stop in their campaign to burn Washington to the ground. Despite an earlier raid that was repulsed by American militia, the more than 4,000-man British force faced no resistance on Aug. 19 as it swarmed ashore in Southern Maryland. Four days later, after defeating disorganized American defenses at Bladensburg, the soldiers marched into Washington unopposed, setting fire to the Capitol and White House and demoralizing the nation.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | May 16, 2012
The 3,000-mile water and land trail network created to relive the Chesapeake Bay's 17th century exploration by English colonists is about to grow still larger. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar and National Park Service Director Jon Jarvis are slated to visit Sandy Point State Park in Annapolis this afternoon to celebrate the addition of four new river river trails to the existing Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail .  The federal officials are to be joined by Gov.Martin O'Malley, local officials, Native American tribal leaders and conservation group representatives.
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