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By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2014
The Baltimore City Council gave preliminary approval Monday for two more years of tax breaks for developers rehabbing historic properties - despite concerns that the program is riddled with errors and amounts to a giveaway to developers who would rehab older buildings without it. The multimillion-dollar program is set to expire next month. While the city's budget director questioned the program and whether the city could afford it, developers and residents rallied around the tax credit as a way to revitalize areas from the waterfront to poorer neighborhoods and called for its extension.
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
The historic Rodgers Forge neighborhood in Towson has adopted guidelines for residents who want to install solar panels, an effort community leaders hope can strike a balance between preserving the community's architecture and embracing alternative energy. A committee of the Rodgers Forge Community Association worked for about a year to come up with the recommendations, which the full board approved in September, according to immediate past president Stu Sirota. "I think this shows that Rodgers Forge is a progressive neighborhood that cares about its history and maintaining the architectural integrity of its homes, while still being able to allow a modern and innovative green technology," Sirota said.
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BUSINESS
November 29, 1998
More than 4,000 properties in Frederick's historic district could benefit from a 25 percent tax credit beginning Jan. 1.The Heritage Preservation Tax Credit for the Rehabilitation of Historic Property, administered by the Maryland Historical Trust, provides a break for "qualified" capital costs spent in the rehabilitation of certified heritage structures.Certified heritage structures are those listed in the National Register of Historic Places, designated as a historic under local law or located in the historic district listed in the National Register.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
If historic tax bills are wrong in the future, at least city property owners will know who to blame. The City Council voted unanimously Monday to give Baltimore's government authority to do the appraisals that determine the size of historic tax credits - essentially stripping state officials of the duty in response to errors that left some property owners with wildly inaccurate bills. The plan, which is expected to get final approval next week, ends months of finger-pointing between state and city officials over who is to blame for the problems.
NEWS
November 9, 1999
DETAILS of the Thomas Fortune House demolition show the need for revision of Baltimore County's zoning code.Historic preservationists decry the surreptitious demolition of the house. Opponents see the case as an example of bureaucracy run amok. Both groups may be correct.The stone house in Timonium -- which was knocked down last month under cover of darkness -- was built 145 years ago by quarry owner Thomas Fortune, who supplied the blocks for the Washington Monument in the nation's capital.
NEWS
By JOSH MITCHELL and JOSH MITCHELL,SUN REPORTER | January 11, 2006
Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr. proposed a plan yesterday to make it easier for owners of historic buildings to receive tax breaks when they improve their properties, drawing praise from preservationists who have assailed the county's record on historic preservation. The measure, expected to come up for a County Council vote Monday, would apply to about 3,000 commercial and residential properties. Owners would get a tax rebate equal to 20 percent of the cost of improvements that exceed $1,000.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff writer | February 3, 1991
Historic preservationists, alarmed that most county land owners appear more interested in building something new than saving something old, met last week to consider forming an umbrella organization to lobby against the destruction of historic properties."
BUSINESS
By Martin Schneider and Martin Schneider,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 5, 2000
An increase in a state tax credit for renovating historic properties has many Baltimore residents joining a record number of Marylanders who have applied for the program. Last year, 113 Maryland property owners filed for the tax credit compared with 59 the year before, meaning the number of historic buildings that will undergo substantial renovations has almost doubled in the past two years. Under Maryland's Heritage Preservation Tax Credit, owners of residential and commercial historic property are allowed income tax credits equal to 25 percent of the cost of renovating the property.
NEWS
By Johns W. Hopkins | April 3, 2012
What is the future for Baltimore's city-owned historic properties? The Baltimore Sun has reported that Baltimore City is hiring an appraisal firm to determine the "market value" of 15 city-owned historic properties. Baltimore Heritage has asked MayorStephanie Rawlings-Blakeand the director of the Department of General Services to make this process open and participatory to ensure that there is a seat at the table for the many citizens and volunteers who for decades have protected and celebrated these important landmarks.
BUSINESS
By Charles Belfoure and Charles Belfoure,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 9, 1999
Every day, Lynne Puckett enjoys the view of the harbor through new glass doors that open from the third floor of her historic home in Butchers Hill.The doors, along with the rest of the renovation work she has done, have added value and comfort to her 1870s rowhouse -- and they opened a way to reduce her state income tax bill this year.More owners of historic properties in Baltimore are taking advantage of two tax credit programs:One is a city program that freezes property taxes at pre-rehab rates; the other, operated by the state, allows owners to regain 25 percent of their rehabilitation costs in the form of a credit on their Maryland income tax.The number of applications to Baltimore's Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation (CHAP)
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
City officials want to hire their own assessors to determine the size of historic tax credits in response to errors blamed on the state that left some property owners with wildly inaccurate bills. The proposal is the latest step by the Rawlings-Blake administration to resolve problems in the calculation of the tax credits for improvement to historic properties. The calculations were sometimes wrong, and some property owners wound up owing thousands of dollars more in taxes than they anticipated.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2014
The Baltimore City Council gave preliminary approval Monday for two more years of tax breaks for developers rehabbing historic properties - despite concerns that the program is riddled with errors and amounts to a giveaway to developers who would rehab older buildings without it. The multimillion-dollar program is set to expire next month. While the city's budget director questioned the program and whether the city could afford it, developers and residents rallied around the tax credit as a way to revitalize areas from the waterfront to poorer neighborhoods and called for its extension.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | October 31, 2013
The next in a series of tours of historic properties hosted by the Historical Society of Harford County is scheduled for Sunday, Nov. 3, from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Hopkins family's scenic Elberton Hill Farm in Darlington. The hosts will welcome visitors to the historic Hopkins-Bayless house, grounds and outbuildings on the working horse farm at 837 Darlington Road in Darlington. This will be an exterior tour of the house. The house stands on part of the tract called Elberton or El Briton, from which several of the surrounding farms were formed.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2013
Maryland officials agreed Wednesday to buy the historic Annapolis post office building from the U.S. Postal Service for use as part of the government complex surrounding the State House. Without dissent, the three-member Board of Public Works agreed to pay $3.2 million for the 13,000-square-foot building on Church Circle. Built in 1901, the structure is listed on the Maryland Historical Trust inventory of historic properties. Under the deal, the state will lease space back to the Postal Service to continue services for eight to 20 months until it relocates.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2012
It would be easier to redevelop large, historic manufacturing sites in Baltimore County under legislation approved Monday by the County Council. Under the bill, tracts of land 40 acres or larger that are zoned for heavy manufacturing and include buildings on the Maryland Historical Trust's historic properties list could be used for retail, office and residential development. Developers would not have to wait for the county rezoning process — which happens every four years — to turn such properties into mixed-use projects.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2012
California residents Caryn and Kurt Burris missed the Star-Spangled Sailabration festivities in June, but they learned all about the Stars and Stripes this month at Fort McHenry National Monument and Historic Shrine. The Burrises toured the birthplace of the national anthem Thursday with their children, Wyatt, 11, and Shelby, 13, while visiting Baltimore to see Kurt's great aunt. "It's an important part of history," Caryn Burris said. "We live in southern California, where everything is so new. It's nice to show the kids where it all started.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2000
An attempt to broaden preservation incentives for owners of historic Baltimore County buildings has fallen short for the second time in two years, as lawmakers search for the right words to accomplish their goals. County Councilman T. Bryan McIntire, an Owings Mills-North County Republican, withdrew a bill Monday that was designed to expand tax credits available to the owners of historic properties. McIntire acted after preservationists pointed out that the legislation could have had the opposite effect and reduced the number of qualified property owners.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert | June 26, 2012
The Baltimore Sun recently published the results of its investigation into chronic problems with the way subsidies have been calculated under a property tax abatement program for historic rehabs. But apart from the problems, there's also this question: How effective has the city's program been at encouraging property owners to undertake historic rehabs they might not otherwise do? Consider the case of wealthy entrepreneur Charles Nabit. Before embarking on a top-to-bottom overhaul of his North Baltimore mansion a decade ago, he applied for the credit, which forgives property taxes on the value of improvements for 10 years.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2012
On a grassy hill a mile west of the Patuxent River, historian Ralph Eshelman can see the same bucolic view of fields and placid water anxious British soldiers likely saw when they landed in the summer of 1814 — the first stop in their campaign to burn Washington to the ground. Despite an earlier raid that was repulsed by American militia, the more than 4,000-man British force faced no resistance on Aug. 19 as it swarmed ashore in Southern Maryland. Four days later, after defeating disorganized American defenses at Bladensburg, the soldiers marched into Washington unopposed, setting fire to the Capitol and White House and demoralizing the nation.
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