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NEWS
February 24, 1991
The county Historic Preservation Commission is worried about the effects four state highway improvement projects could have on four historic properties.Sallie Van Rennselaer, chairman of the county commission, sent the commission's concerns to Delegate Rosemary Hatem Bonsack, D-District 34, earlier this month."The last delegation made plans with the state roads department,and we were always fighting them after the decision was made," Van Rennselaer said last week."We wanted to make this delegation awarewe'd like to be in on the process, so we can work with them."
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NEWS
May 18, 2008
Free fitness tests for seniors The Harford County Department of Community Services' Office on Aging will offer a free physical fitness test for seniors at area senior centers for Older Americans Month. Seniors 60 and older who are senior center members can get the test from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. tomorrow at McFaul Center, Wednesday at Havre de Grace Center, and May 29 at Aberdeen Center; and 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. May 27 at Edgewood Center. Participants will receive a free gift courtesy of Medi-CareFirst BlueCross Blue Shield.
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NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2004
In a surprising reversal, Annapolis officials have agreed to stop work on a controversial project around Church Circle and seek approval for the work from the city's Historic Preservation Commission. The city previously had maintained that it did not need the commission's approval for the project because the work already had been approved in the mid-1990s. City officials also said it was a maintenance project, which doesn't need commission approval. But preservationists claimed that the city was trying to skirt the commission - which must approve most work in the city's historic district - and was disturbing human remains buried near the circle.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,Sun reporter | March 9, 2008
An Annapolis couple who allowed fiberglass columns on the new porch of their 19th-century home in downtown Annapolis without receiving permission from the city's Historic Preservation Commission, have sued the panel, charging that its denial of their materials switch was unreasonably stringent. Valerie and Bryan J. Miller have asked Anne Arundel County Circuit Court to overturn the commission's decision and its order that the fiberglass columns be torn down and replaced with wood. The lawsuit, filed Feb. 20, has roiled the local historians and preservationists who passionately defend the building standards in downtown Annapolis' Historic District.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | December 24, 1997
The owner of a burned Annapolis building may not demolish the historic facade yet, an Anne Arundel County circuit judge ruled yesterday, but the judge also recommended that city officials decide quickly whether the charred brick ruins ought to be saved.The injunction by Judge James C. Cawood Jr. delighted the Historic Annapolis Foundation. The nonprofit group sued to prevent Ronald B. Hollander from razing what is left of his 1899 building in the historic district before an evaluation and without approval from the Historic Preservation Commission.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | December 24, 1997
The owner of a burned Annapolis building may not demolish the historic facade yet, an Anne Arundel County Circuit Court judge ruled yesterday, but the judge also recommended that city officials decide quickly whether the charred brick ruins should be saved.The injunction by Judge James C. Cawood Jr. delighted the Historic Annapolis Foundation. The nonprofit group sued to prevent Ronald B. Hollander from razing what is left of his 1899 building in the historic district before an evaluation and without approval from the Historic Preservation Commission.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | January 5, 1998
An Anne Arundel Circuit judge wants lawyers for the Historic Annapolis Foundation, the city and a Main Street property owner to try to straighten out the legal morass brought on by the fire that destroyed 184-186 Main St.Judge James C. Cawood Jr. has scheduled a meeting with the lawyers and building owner Thursday in his chambers.Last week, Ronald B. Hollander, who owns the building gutted in a five-alarm fire Dec. 9, asked the court to review two city decisions that prevent him from demolishing the remains of the 1899 structure.
NEWS
January 27, 1991
The Sykesville Historic Preservation Commission decided last Tuesdayto spend its remaining money earmarked for the train station restoration on burying electrical wiring.Chairwoman Rebecca Herman said the commission will pay to have an unsightly exterior electrical cable buried underground to try to add to the attractiveness of the building.The group also is buying a plaque to be placed somewhere in the train station with a list of names of those who donated $1,000 or more to the restoration project.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2003
An Anne Arundel County judge is expected to decide within a few days whether work on a $5.5 million addition to the Banneker-Douglass Museum can take place without permits issued by Annapolis government. Lawyers for three levels of government argued Friday in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court that city building and grading permits, which require approval by the city's Historic Preservation Commission, are not needed. But owners of a law office across the street challenged that, contending in part that the planned $5.5 million addition is an architectural misfit in the neighborhood.
NEWS
By William Wan and William Wan,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2005
Over the protests of preservationists, a City Council committee approved a proposal last night to merge Baltimore's historic preservation commission with the city Planning Department. In the bill that now goes to the full City Council for approval, the committee left out amendments urged by the Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation - an omission that critics say will strip the commission of its power. "It feels like someone's trying to put a lid on us," Judith Miller, chairwoman of the CHAP board, said after the Urban Affairs Committee's 3-1 vote, with one abstention.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,sun reporter | December 9, 2007
A gleaming new structure that will house a jewelry store and office space has emerged on the site of a five-alarm fire 10 years ago that destroyed two buildings that represented more than a century of history on Annapolis' historic Main Street. The new building, which holds the addresses of 184/186 Main St. and 7 State Circle, has brought closure to the community, which witnessed long fighting over plans for the site and had been frustrated by the appearance of the vacant lot in the heart of Annapolis' prized historic district.
NEWS
October 7, 2007
Harford County government offices will be open tomorrow on Columbus Day. The Harford County Waste Disposal Center and Waste to Energy also will be open. Harford County Public Library will be closed for a staff in-service day. Senior centers, public schools and Harford Transit will be open. Upper Crossroads meeting is Wednesday The Harford County Sheriff's Office will hold an Upper Crossroads community-awareness meeting at 7 p.m. Wednesday at the Fallston High School auditorium, 2301 Carrs Mill Road.
NEWS
By JAMIE STIEHM and JAMIE STIEHM,SUN REPORTER | June 13, 2006
Starbucks is renewing its efforts to put a 21st-century coffee shop in the 18th-century Maryland Inn in Annapolis. The idea drew protests when it was first raised a few months ago, but the Seattle-based corporation has modified its plan and won some important supporters for the idea of opening a high-end coffee shop in a place that once housed a tavern visited by George Washington. The Annapolis Historic Preservation Commission is scheduled to consider tonight proposed changes to the property's exterior to accommodate a Starbucks-licensed store - similar to a franchise.
NEWS
January 4, 2006
The old King of France Tavern is a wonderfully cozy place. Brick floors, stone walls, low ceilings, a double fireplace and a wooden bar polished to a high sheen - all tucked slightly below ground in the basement of Annapolis's wedge-shaped Maryland Inn. And oh the stories that two-century-old space could tell! Of America's founding fathers hustling cards, of state legislators from the Colonial era to the Third Millennium striking deals over drinks, of music lovers coming to the hottest spot for jazz this side of New Orleans.
NEWS
By JAMIE STIEHM and JAMIE STIEHM,SUN REPORTER | December 14, 2005
The Annapolis' Historic Preservation Commission decided last night to postpone reviewing a proposal to open a Starbucks coffee shop inside a historic inn on Church Circle. Commission Chairman William Schmickle said the coffee shop owners lack building code approval from the city's Department of Neighborhoods and Environmental Programs, which has decided that the plans do not meet federal wheelchair and disability access laws. Schmickle said the commission could not consider or vote on the plans for a coffee shop in the vacant basement room at the 18th-century Maryland Inn until the permit is obtained.
NEWS
By JAMIE STIEHM and JAMIE STIEHM,SUN REPORTER | December 13, 2005
George Washington is said to have gambled away a horse there. Later, jazz legend Charlie Byrd serenaded fans in late-night jam sessions in the cozy brick room. And, if the Annapolis historic preservation commission goes along tonight, you'll be able to order a tall pumpkin spice latte in the room, in the basement of the Maryland Inn. Plans by Starbucks to occupy the former King of France Tavern have some city leaders lamenting an encroaching sameness in the heart of the Colonial capital.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | January 22, 2004
A routine maintenance project on Church Circle in historic Annapolis was partially halted yesterday after city workers discovered human remains this week and preservationists raised concerns that the city had not followed proper procedure for working in the historic district. City workers were digging a trench, raising curbs and replacing bricks at the circle, next to St. Anne's Church in Annapolis, when they discovered a leg bone Tuesday. Workers found additional historic human remains yesterday before stopping part of their work on the $130,000 project.
NEWS
By Carol Bowers and Carol Bowers,Staff writer | April 26, 1992
Historic buildings and other structures owned by the county could not be razed without approval from the County Council and the Harford Historic Preservation Commission under a proposal before the council.Council President Jeffrey D. Wilson said he introduced the measure, put to a public hearing last week, because he believes the county should have a policy of "leadership by example."Wilson said his proposal was prompted in part by the destruction last year of the old county maternity hospital at routes 22 and 543.The hospital building, used as an office in recent years, was soldby its private owner to make way for a service station.
NEWS
By William Wan and William Wan,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2005
Over the protests of preservationists, a City Council committee approved a proposal last night to merge Baltimore's historic preservation commission with the city Planning Department. In the bill that now goes to the full City Council for approval, the committee left out amendments urged by the Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation - an omission that critics say will strip the commission of its power. "It feels like someone's trying to put a lid on us," Judith Miller, chairwoman of the CHAP board, said after the Urban Affairs Committee's 3-1 vote, with one abstention.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | August 1, 2005
Can Baltimore's historic preservation commission be "strong and independent" and, at the same time, part of another city agency? Or is that a contradiction in terms? Those are key questions facing City Council members who will vote this month on a bill that would merge Baltimore's Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation with the Department of Planning. The council's Urban Affairs Committee held a public hearing on the legislation last week and will discuss it again in City Hall at 5 p.m. Aug. 8. After that meeting, the bill will be brought out of committee for a vote by the full council Aug. 15. The vote will mark the culmination of months of debate about the fate of the preservation commission, a watchdog agency with the power to block demolition or inappropriate alterations to historic buildings throughout the city.
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