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NEWS
January 7, 1991
The Department of Housing and Community Development, through its agency the Maryland Historical Trust, released a list of properties under consideration by the Governor's Consulting Committee for nominationto the National Register of Historic Places.County properties under consideration are: Aisquith Farm E Archaeological Site; Dorr Archeological Site; and Magothy Quartzite Quarry Archaeological Site.A committee meeting will begin at 10:30 a.m., Jan. 30 in the main-floor conference room of the Shaw House, 21 State Circle, Annapolis.
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FEATURES
by Samantha Iacia and For the Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
Location: Central Baltimore City, less than two miles northwest of the Inner Harbor. The neighborhood is partially bounded by North Howard Street and Mount Royal Avenue to the east and Eutaw Place to the west. Average property listing price: For sales between January and July 2014, prices ranged from $80,000 to $416,000, with the average price being $233,000 for a 1,400-square-foot unit, according to Wayne Curtis, a real estate agent with RE/MAX Advantage Realty. Size and population: The nine-by-five-block area is home to approximately 2,000 residents, according to boltonhill.org.
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NEWS
By CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | February 2, 1998
WASHINGTON - The F. Leonard Wailes Law Office at 116-118 E. Main St. in the central business area of Salisbury has been named to the National Register of Historic Places.The law office is one of the last survivors of an October 1886 fire that leveled most of the city's business district.It is architecturally significant for its early 20th-century law office design and incorporates neo-federal elements into an urban townhouse form, according to National Register documents.The office, a two-story, four-bay brick building with a slate roof, was built in 1927 by Salisbury architect W. Twilley Malone.
NEWS
By Samantha Iacia and For the Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Location: North-central Baltimore City, partially bounded by Charles Village to the south, Loyola/Notre Dame to the north and York Road to the east. Average home listing price: $610,000 in 2013, says Tom Hobbs, president of the Guilford Association. Population: About 3,000, says Lynda Riley, secretary of the Guilford Association. The history: Named in honor of the 1781 Battle of Guilford Courthouse in North Carolina, the 296-acre estate passed from the family of Revolutionary War veteran William McDonald to Baltimore Sun founder Arunah S. Abell and eventually to the Roland Park Co. in 1911.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Sun Staff Writer | December 8, 1994
Carroll County has no shortage of towns in the National Register of Historic Places. Sites in Westminster, Sykesville, Uniontown and Taneytown have been recognized for their historical significance.Now it's Union Bridge's turn.The town's Main Street area is the latest Carroll district to be included in the register, a division of the National Park Service."Union Bridge had not really even been looked at, and it was time," said Ken Short, the county's historic planner. "There are so many great resources there."
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Staff Writer | December 16, 1993
Lawyers Hill, an Elkridge neighborhood that used to be a summer retreat for Baltimore City jurists, has been named to the National Register of Historic Places."
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Staff Writer | January 26, 1993
The town of Union Bridge may have its application for the National Register of Historic Places reviewed next month by a gubernatorial committee.Ken Short, an architectural historian for the state, told town officials at last night's town meeting that he has completed the nomination application, which could be reviewed by the Governor's Consulting Committee as soon as Feb. 23."The committee will be looking at how the structures have survived over the years, like have they kept their historic integrity," said Mr. Short, a former county historic planner who had worked with the town.
FEATURES
By Thomas G. Watts and Thomas G. Watts,DALLAS MORNING NEWS | June 15, 1997
SMITH CENTER, Kan. -- The buffalo no longer roam and the antelope certainly don't play around here anymore.But in a stand of cottonwoods on the banks of Beaver Creek is the one-room log cabin where Dr. Brewster Higley wrote a song of the West more than a century ago. "Home on the Range" became the favorite of Franklin D. Rooseveltand the state song of Kansas.This dilapidated little cabin shares a distinction with more famous structures and places, such as Mount Vernon, Yellowstone National Park and the grounds of the Battle of Gettysburg.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | February 24, 1998
Residents of Original Northwood are confident they've come up with a lesson in what makes a lovely and livable neighborhood.Standing before the city's Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation recently, they ticked off their reasons why this home-proud Northeast Baltimore community, constructed during the depths of the Depression, should be listed on the prestigious National Register of Historic Places."
NEWS
By Melissa Corley and Melissa Corley,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | March 8, 1998
CHESTERTOWN -- Lauretum looks like someone slapped together the "Addams Family" mansion and a gingerbread house.It is just that combination of characteristics that won the Chestertown bed-and-breakfast a spot on the National Register of Historic Places."
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
- In the heart of this town on the old U.S. National Road in Western Maryland, a woman leans on the front desk of an 1890s-era hotel, her face a study in mixed emotions. Tina Storey loves her work as office manager of Failinger's Hotel Gunter, the grande dame of lodging in Frostburg with its polished oak staircase, Victorian settees and zillions of artifacts and displays that evoke the history of the so-called "Mountain Side of Maryland. " But she's still grieving the woman who revived the place.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2014
A homebuyer in Baltimore certainly doesn't need to leave the city limits to live in the lap of luxury. One of the area's finest homes is found at 206 Goodwood Gardens in Roland Park. This magnificent Colonial Revival, built of stucco and featuring a side porch that wraps around to the rear of the home, dates to 1907 and was once home to Daniel Willard, who served as president of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad for 31 years. Located on almost a half-acre of manicured lawns and gardens, this property is being sold for $2.2 million.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2014
Now that signs of the history of Hampstead Hill have been unearthed, historians hope to keep its 200-year-old stories from being forgotten again soon. Advocates for Patterson Park and Baltimore's legacy of the War of 1812 plan new signs and displays for artifacts uncovered in an archaeological dig completed this month, including a musket ball and gunflint dating to 1814 and a belt buckle from the Civil War. They also plan to seek inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places.
TRAVEL
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
For anyone who enjoys bike riding or hiking, the path along the Chesapeake & Ohio Canal is special. Riding there on a recent chilly spring morning, I see the Potomac River to my left, serene in some spots, roaring with foamy fury in others. To my right, the opaque emerald of the canal's sluggish water glints in the sun, chopped into segments by wooden locks. Mallards bob in groups and egrets take flight as joggers keep pace alongside their dogs. These days, enjoying the towpath doesn't have to mean heading home at dusk or even setting up a tent at a campground.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2013
John and Sandi Kroh are leaving Appler-Englar Farm after more than 40 years of meticulously restoring the old farmhouse near New Windsor. The retired Baltimore County school principals are downsizing and moving to Baltimore, where they can walk to shops and restaurants. But before they sell, the Krohs thought they would offer tribute to their Carroll County home by entering it in The Baltimore Sun's first Historic Homes Contest. The idea was a winner, and so is the house, chosen from among more than 30 entries and five finalists.
NEWS
Special to The Aegis | December 10, 2013
Ladew Gardens in Monkton will celebrate Christmas in seasonal resplendence with its annual open house Dec. 13-15, as local floral designers and local garden clubs are invited to decorate the rooms of the circa 1747 Manor House, adorning the walls, tabletops and fireplace mantels in festive holiday splendor. In its 33rd year, Ladew's Christmas Open House, according to the event's organizers, has been called "one of Maryland's most memorable and decorative holiday events. " The Christmas Open House is open from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. this Friday, Saturday and Sunday.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 24, 2000
Dick Hopkins is celebrating an anniversary. It's been 50 years since he purchased his home on Stratford Road in Academy Heights for $8,800. And now the area is being prepared to be entered into the National Register of Historic Places. In his historical outline for Baltimore County and the National Register of Historic Places, Daniel Rosen, another neighborhood resident, noted that Academy Heights "located on a now-defunct streetcar line ... was literally the first stop of Baltimore's great postwar migration to the suburbs."
BUSINESS
By Charles Belfoure and Charles Belfoure,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 25, 2001
Stone Hill, a Baltimore neighborhood of small stone houses built in 1845 for textile-mill workers, is getting some attention these days. "It's a kind of an honor for a community," said Norma Theo Pinette, a resident of Stone Hill, a section of Hampden. "We share a look and a love of our history so that's why we did it." By year's end, Stone Hill will be listed on the National Register of Historic Places, a kind of honorary society run by the National Park Service for properties that are historically and culturally significant.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | November 29, 2013
Whether it's called the David Bachrach House or the Gertrude Stein House makes no difference to me. This Reservoir Hill landmark, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, has finally achieved a striking, permanent restoration. It languished in ruins for decades and faced a dubious future, despite its remarkable pedigree. Just this month, its final group of new residents moved into what has re-emerged as a Linden Avenue Victorian showcase, a charming reminder of what would have been a breeze-filled suburban cottage surrounded by fields near Druid Hill Park.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | November 24, 2013
A careless driver ran into the wrought-iron fence surrounding Baltimore's historic Old Otterbein Church early Sunday morning, knocking over a roughly 20-foot section fronting Sharp Street and leaving church officials scrambling to get repairs done in time for the holidays. Daniel Fisher, head of the church's board of trustees, said he arrived at Old Otterbein around 9:45 Sunday morning and discovered the damage. He said security personnel at the nearby Baltimore Convention Center told him they heard a crash around 2:30 a.m. Sunday and called police.
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