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By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2012
City Hall is considering selling or leasing 15 historic Baltimore landmarks, including the iconic Shot Tower and stately War Memorial building, which officials believe are underused and could bring the city sorely needed cash. The idea has excited those who say the sites have been neglected and allowed to fall into disrepair. But some preservationists are worried about an uncertain future for buildings they hold dear. "I've never heard about them thinking about anything like this," said Richard S.B. Smith Sr., director of the Friends of Orianda House in Leakin Park, one of the properties to be evaluated.
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FEATURES
By Leah Polakoff, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2013
Tucked away in the state's capital, adjacent to the Naval Academy, sits the Peggy Stewart House, a historic house that played an important role in the American Revolution and was home at different times to a signer of the Constitution and a signer of the Declaration of Independence. The Georgian-style home, built in the 1760s and designated a National Historic Landmark, is on the market for $3.2 million. The remodeled home at 207 Hanover St. has five bedrooms, 31/2 bathrooms, six fireplaces and an eight-car garage.
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NEWS
By Brendan Kearney and Brendan Kearney,SUN STAFF | July 15, 2002
The Baltimore County Council has added eight area properties to the county's list of historic landmarks, a move designed to preserve the architectural character of the buildings. The properties are the McCubbin-Quinn Bungalow in Glyndon, Christian's Chance near Butler, Roslyn and the Hamburger-Hefter Bungalow in Pikesville, Samuel's Hope in Ruxton, the Ridge School and Riderwood railroad station in Riderwood, and the Brooklandville railroad station. They were named landmarks last month.
EXPLORE
By Jennifer Broadwater | October 12, 2012
Visitors to Maryland -- and those wanting to explore more of the state they already call home -- can consult a new book showcasing the state's scenic byways and a mobile application that serves as a guide to the area's Civil War trails. Both items are part of the state's effort to boost tourism. Since 2007, Maryland has seen a 26-percent bump in visits -- amounting to an increase of 7.2 million visitors over the five-year period, according to a national survey of U.S. travelers conducted by D.K. Shifflet and Associates, a tourism industry research firm.
NEWS
By JOHNATHON E. BRIGGS and JOHNATHON E. BRIGGS,SUN STAFF | October 21, 2001
Nestled on the scenic Chesapeake Bay, the city of Annapolis is a beacon that draws thousands to its historic landmarks, waterfront lifestyle and proximity to the dynamic Baltimore-Washington employment market. But being popular has its downsides. Congested roads, scarce parking and heavy crowds during tourist season tax the patience of residents. The Maryland General Assembly invades for 90 days each year, adding to the pressure. With property at a premium in the coveted city core, anyone looking for real estate in downtown Annapolis can expect to pay top prices.
NEWS
March 26, 2012
I totally agree with the "Readers Respond" letter from Roz Ellis Heid, responding to the city's idea of possibly selling, leasing, or maintaining 15 historic City landmarks ("City eyeing sale of 15 sites," March 21). As Ms. Heid, Baltimore Heritage Executive Director Johns Hopkins and The Sun article note, a number of volunteer groups, including Friends of Orianda House (Crimea Mansion), Baltimore City Historical Society (Peale Museum), and the Roland Water Tower Preservation Campaign have invested money and thousands of hours to preserve and restore these historic landmarks.
NEWS
March 26, 2012
News that Baltimore officials are considering selling or leasing as many as 16 of the city's historic landmarks - including the iconic Shot Tower and the War Memorial Building - has sparked alarm and outrage among people who fear allowing them to fall into private hands could lead to the loss of a priceless historical legacy. No one wants to see these magnificent architectural gems turned into fast-food emporiums or low-end strip malls. But if the city handles the matter carefully, at least some of them could be transferred in a way that ensures they will be well cared for and preserved for future generations.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | September 27, 1992
The Johns Hopkins University Office of Special Events will sponsor an all-day bus trip Oct. 3 that will give participants a chance to explore the 18th and 19th century architecture and interiors of Dickeyville.The bus trip will include a visit to the oldest residence in the New England-style village, which was established in 1719. Visitors will also see a sculptor's studio, church and additional 19th century houses.The bus will leave Hopkins' Homewood campus at 3400 N. Charles St. at 10 a.m. and return between 3 p.m. and 3:45 p.m. Tickets cost $40 per person and include lunch.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2011
Baltimore's preservation panel intends to recommend that Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake withhold approval of the $150 million Lexington Square redevelopment because it calls for the demolition of historic buildings previously targeted for preservation, including the former Read's drugstore, site of a 1955 civil rights sit-in. Members of Baltimore's Commission on Historical and Architectural Preservation also indicated Wednesday that they would start the process for adding the Read's building to the city's "special list" of historic landmarks, an action that would automatically protect it from demolition for at least six months.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | April 13, 2002
Thirteen of 14 sites on the campus of Sheppard Pratt Hospital have been recommended to Baltimore County as historic landmarks, possibly interfering with the hospital's redevelopment plans. The county Landmark Preservation Commission sided late Thursday night with Towson preservationists who wanted all 14 sites designated as historic. The matter goes before the County Council, which will have final say on the designation. If approved, the hospital would need county approval to alter any of the selected structures.
NEWS
September 27, 2012
It's easy to see why the city's sale of the Senator Theatre gave Comptroller Joan Pratt heartburn. The city paid $810,000 for the movie palace three years ago and this week sold it for a $310,000 loss. Worse yet, the city is hardly washing its hands of the seemingly snakebit property. It will hold the mortgage — and charge a minuscule 2 percent in interest. The city is putting up an additional $700,000 loan to the theater's new owners, who are also receiving a loan from the state and another from a bank.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2012
After being closed to the public for nearly two decades, a new day may be dawning for the Peale Museum on Holliday Street if its planned restoration as the Peale Center for Baltimore History and Architecture comes to fruition. "I think it has lots of significance to Baltimore. It had been the city's first City Hall, an African-American school and where gas illumination was used by a company that eventually became BGE," said Walter Schamu, a partner in the firm of Schamu, Machowski, Grego Architects, which prepared restoration plans with consulting architect James T. Wollon Jr. "It's a handsome building that can be saved and given a new life," said Schamu.
NEWS
April 2, 2012
It's a start. Baltimore City's decision to consider selling or otherwise turning over 15 city-owned historic landmarks to new ownership or management is a step in the right direction. But is it well thought out and does it go far enough? For decades the city's enormous collection of historic properties has languished. It has been clear for some time that neither municipal resources nor will are sufficient to provide the stewardship these properties require and deserve. The situation has worsened with every passing year, so I applaudMayor Rawlings-Blake's recent action.
EXPLORE
March 27, 2012
The Department of Planning and Zoning in conjunction with the Harford County Historic Preservation Commission is seeking nominations for the 2012 Historic Preservation Awards. As part of this year's annual celebration, the Harford County Historic Preservation Commission will present preservation awards to individuals and organizations whose contributions demonstrate outstanding achievements in historic preservation in Harford County. Awards will be presented in May in recognition of National Historic Preservation Month.
NEWS
March 26, 2012
I totally agree with the "Readers Respond" letter from Roz Ellis Heid, responding to the city's idea of possibly selling, leasing, or maintaining 15 historic City landmarks ("City eyeing sale of 15 sites," March 21). As Ms. Heid, Baltimore Heritage Executive Director Johns Hopkins and The Sun article note, a number of volunteer groups, including Friends of Orianda House (Crimea Mansion), Baltimore City Historical Society (Peale Museum), and the Roland Water Tower Preservation Campaign have invested money and thousands of hours to preserve and restore these historic landmarks.
NEWS
March 26, 2012
News that Baltimore officials are considering selling or leasing as many as 16 of the city's historic landmarks - including the iconic Shot Tower and the War Memorial Building - has sparked alarm and outrage among people who fear allowing them to fall into private hands could lead to the loss of a priceless historical legacy. No one wants to see these magnificent architectural gems turned into fast-food emporiums or low-end strip malls. But if the city handles the matter carefully, at least some of them could be transferred in a way that ensures they will be well cared for and preserved for future generations.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | December 9, 2004
In a move to buttress Dundalk's revitalization efforts, community leaders are attempting to have five sites designated as Baltimore County historic landmarks. Advocates of the plan have cleared the first bureaucratic hurdle. The Landmarks Preservation Commission has given preliminary approval to the request. The sites include the old Dundalk YMCA building, 10 Dunmanway; St. Rita's Roman Catholic Church's annex building and DeLawder Hall, both in the first block of Dunmanway; and the National Distillers Products, commonly known as Seagram's, distillery buildings, 7101 Sollers Point Road.
EXPLORE
March 27, 2012
The Department of Planning and Zoning in conjunction with the Harford County Historic Preservation Commission is seeking nominations for the 2012 Historic Preservation Awards. As part of this year's annual celebration, the Harford County Historic Preservation Commission will present preservation awards to individuals and organizations whose contributions demonstrate outstanding achievements in historic preservation in Harford County. Awards will be presented in May in recognition of National Historic Preservation Month.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2012
WEATHER Today's forecast calls for mostly cloudy skies and a high temperature near 73 degrees. It is expected to be mostly cloudy tonight with a low temperature around 56 degrees. TRAFFIC Check our traffic updates for this morning's issues as you plan your commute. FROM LAST NIGHT... Board OKs Mays Chapel elementary school : The Baltimore County school board voted Tuesday evening to build an elementary school in Mays Chapel despite angry opposition from neighbors.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2012
ON THE SITE... City Hall considers selling 15 historic landmarks : Baltimore's Board of Estimates is slated to approve a contract with a consultant reviewing the sale or lease of the Shot Tower,  Upton Mansion, Clifton Park Valve House and Old Town Friends' Meeting House. The consultant will determine the market value of the landmarks. The Anne Arundel County Council subpoenas police chief to testify on Leopold :  The council wants Police Chief Col. James E. Teare, Sr. to answer questions next week about the political corruption case of County Executive John R. Leopold.
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