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NEWS
By Blair Ames, bames@tribune.com | October 30, 2012
When some business owners use sandbags to protect their property during storms, Bean Hollow owner Gretchen Shuey uses bags of ground coffee. The Ellicott City store owner laid about 1,000 pounds of ground coffee bags behind the door of her business and used duct tape to fill in the seams in preparation for Hurricane Sandy Monday night. Thankfully, it wasn't necessary as the historic district in Ellicott City avoided flooding. "Yes, yes I do feel lucky," Shuey said inside the coffee shop Tuesday morning.
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NEWS
By Julekha Dash and For The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
The Doberman sits on the edge of a bed, oblivious of the remarkable view from the floor-to-ceiling window. Modern high-rises peep out from a dense forest dotted with palm trees and shrouded in mist. Artist Jereme Scott says his painting was inspired by a 1957 photograph in National Geographic. At 66 inches by 50 inches, “The Watcher of Suite Singapore” is the largest item on display at his store, Cotton Duck Art & Apparel, in Historic Ellicott City. The shop, which opened in March, also sells T-shirts, hoodies and tank tops Scott designed, and jewelry made by designers from the Mid-Atlantic.  Scott, 28, studied fine arts at St. Joseph's University in Philadelphia and received his master's in studio arts from Howard University.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | September 23, 2001
There were several reasons for celebration at Historic Ellicott City's 17th annual Decorator Show House preview party. One, this is the 25th anniversary of the Ellicott City B&O Railroad Museum, which the organization supports. Two, the show house this year is the Columbia treasure, Dorsey Hall. And three, "This house is 250 years old, and in our 17 years of doing show houses, it's the first one with air conditioning," exulted event chair Rick Weinkam. On this summery night, the party's 225 guests seemed to share that sentiment as they drifted between the house and a tent outside that housed a dinner buffet and a live band.
NEWS
Pete Pichaske and For The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
As a parade of designers and artisans swirls around him, Brian Keegan is an island of calm and a rock of assistance. He answers the telephone, keeps track of who comes and goes, replaces a few lightbulbs. It's his job for two months a year, and he loves it. Keegan, 73, is a “house sitter” for Historic Ellicott City's Decorator Show House, an annual event during which a historic Howard County property is restored, redecorated and opened to the public for a month.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Staff Writer | January 24, 1994
Three groups in historic Ellicott City are joining forces to promote local issues, such as parking, and to establish solidarity among merchants, residents and property owners.The Ellicott City Restoration Foundation, a 14-year-old nonprofit civic group, for the first time is adding members from the Ellicott City Business Association and Historic Ellicott City Inc., a nonprofit group that operates the B&O Railroad Station Museum.By uniting behind common interests in historic Ellicott City, members of the three groups say they hope to wield greater influence with the county on behalf of the historic district.
BUSINESS
By Brad Schleicher and Brad Schleicher,Sun reporter | October 28, 2007
Nestled on the banks of the Patapsco River, Historic Ellicott City has served many purposes. Founded in 1771 by the Ellicott brothers, Joseph, Andrew and John, the town existed for its milling and flour production. During the Civil War, it was a pivotal Union outpost. Today, the picturesque downtown is a popular tourist spot and a must-visit for history buffs and window shoppers. Here, new shops open quickly after the old ones close. And other than the occasional housing renovation, the look and feel of the town remains fairly constant.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Sun Staff Writer | September 12, 1994
Armed with cameras, clipboards and surveys, Alan Feinberg and Sharon Suarez hope to solve historic Ellicott City's parking shortage."We're going to figure out how to have parking for all and minimize the impact of traffic," said Mr. Feinberg, president of FeinDesign Associates Inc., a Frederick-based planning and design firm, which is conducting a $17,200 parking study of the area.The study, which started last month, will identify the community's parking problems, devise long- and short-term solutions, and calculate the costs of those solutions.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Sun Staff Writer | October 24, 1994
Historic Ellicott City could have a miniature movie palace like The Senator or the Charles if Jill Porter has her way.The Baltimore resident plans to reopen the Ellicott Theatre at the corner of Main Street and Old Columbia Pike and show artistic, second-run and classic films like those featured in the Baltimore movie houses."
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Sun Staff Writer | April 15, 1994
In preparation for Earth Day, local merchants, city government officials and Boy Scouts tomorrow plan to clean up a portion of the Patapsco River that runs through historic Ellicott City.The group will pick up discarded bottles, paper and other debris that has collected along the river near the parking lot on Main Street and Maryland Avenue and the bridge between historic Ellicott City and Oella.The Patapsco River "was looking real, real trashy," said County Council member Darrell Drown, who requested the clean-up.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Staff Writer | July 26, 1993
Parking problems in the historic district of Ellicott City could be alleviated before the end of the year, when a new 82-space parking lot is expected to open just across the Patapsco River bridge.Construction on the parking lot, a joint venture between Howard and Baltimore counties, is scheduled to begin this fall.The project was moved ahead after Howard County earlier this month won a $213,000 transportation award for the construction, which also includes building sidewalks in the neighborhood of Oella and upgrading the bridge, from the state Transportation Department's Enhancement Program.
NEWS
By Jennifer Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun Media Group | November 18, 2013
There are plenty of ways to celebrate the season locally. Here are just a few festive occasions.   Midnight Madness Main Street, Ellicott City, visitellicottcity.com On Dec. 6, shops in Historic Ellicott City will stay open until midnight and the Main Street corridor will be festive with live music, carolers and special attractions like a tree-lighting ceremony.   Festival of Trains B&O Railroad Museum, 2711 Maryland Ave., Ellicott City, borail.org Ellicott City's B&O Railroad Museum will be filled with toy trains and model railroads designed by local clubs, including an ornate, interactive Lego model and a Thomas the Tank Engine layout.
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | September 20, 2013
A museum dedicated to the history of law enforcement in Howard County is scheduled to open on Main Street in Historic Ellicott City by the end of this year. Construction on the project is under way, and the expected cost of the museum is $120,000, according to a Howard County police news release. Funding for the project will come through donations and sponsorships.  The first phase was funded by donations from the Howard County Police Foundation, Supervisors' Alliance and Retired Officers Association.
NEWS
By Jennifer Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun Media Group | September 16, 2013
Authors and fans of novels of the spooky variety will gather in Historic Ellicott City this month for a new “mini-convention” dubbed HallowRead. Organized by author Rachel Rawlings, of Aberdeen, the event is designed to appeal to authors and readers of paranormal, urban fantasy, steampunk and horror genres. Events begin Friday, Oct. 25, with an Ellicott City ghost tour and a steampunk author tea with readings and a Q&A session at Tea on the Tiber. On Saturday, Oct. 26, authors will hold book signings and panels on topics such as “Love, Light and Angels,” “Name That Vampire” and “The Good, The Bad & The Irresistible.” Saturday evening will include an outdoor performance of “Dracula” by the Chesapeake Shakespeare Company at the ruins of the Patapsco Female Institute.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, jholzberg76@msn.com | August 25, 2013
An excursion train to transport passengers between Ellicott City and Baltimore via existing railroad tracks is one of the ideas being considered by a revamped Main Street organization. Uncovering the portion of the Tiber River that currently flows under a parking lot and transforming it into an attraction - instead of treating it like an asphalt-covered nuisance - is another. These two concepts are being discussed by the Ellicott City Historic District Partnership, which replaced the Ellicott City Restoration Foundation in June.
EXPLORE
By Jennifer Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun Media Group | August 19, 2013
To Hatsumi Watanabe-Smith, Ellicott City's new Japanese tea parlor is a “daydream” come true. Matcha Time Cafe, according to Watanabe-Smith, fills a void in the local tea market and in her life -- having missed the shop's signature green matcha brew since moving to the United States some 20 years ago. Brewed from tea leaves ground into a fine powder, matcha is a somewhat thick green tea touted for its antioxidant qualities. To offset its bitterness, it is traditionally served with a confection, such as red-bean-filled mochi.
EXPLORE
By Leah Polakoff | July 22, 2013
Kimberly Kepnes, co-owner of ScoopAhhDeeDoo, laughs as she says that the opening of her ice cream shop was “completely by accident.” That “accident” is now celebrating its second summer season as an addition to the Little French Market Cafe in Historic Ellicott City. “With the cafe, we had a growing need to expand our offerings,” Kepnes says. Four years ago, Kepnes and two of her girlfriends opened the Little French Market Cafe to enhance their favorite courtyard off Ellicott City's bustling Main Street.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | July 22, 1996
A prospective restaurant owner in the midst of an acrimonious development dispute in historic Ellicott City has asked the Howard County Circuit Court to review a Board of Appeals decision in a separate case.In the latest dispute, Peter G. Ruff has appealed a board decision letting a Columbia developer build an apartment building for low-income senior citizens on Hamilton Street in the historic commercial district.In May, the board granted the D. A. McDaniels development company a variance in county zoning regulations to build a 12-unit housing project for elderly people with incomes of $18,000 to $24,000 a year near Old Columbia Pike.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | November 3, 2008
Jean O. Hannon, a longtime Howard County preservationist who played a major role in the revitalization of Ellicott City and the establishment of its historic district in the mid-1970s, died Oct. 27 at St. Agnes Hospital of complications from a fall at her home. She was 82. "I like things that are old," Mrs. Hannon told The Sun when she stepped down in 1994 after serving on Howard County's Historic District Commission for eight years. "If you don't know what's happened before, you don't know what's going to happen in the future."
EXPLORE
By Samantha Iacia | April 16, 2013
Main Street is finding its inner peace. After opening Gogo Guru, a women's yoga and fitness clothing shop, in Historic Ellicott City in November 2012, Hilary Brich expanded her operation with a yoga studio in February. Brich's original plan was to simply provide the shop's patrons with information about where in the neighborhood they could practice yoga. But with most of the studios being more than a few miles away, she noticed a problem. “People kept asking where to do yoga but didn't want to go farther away than they had to,” says Brich.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun and By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2013
Before it became "The Wall That Ate Some Cars," it was just a stone wall on Mulligans Hill Lane, bracing a 20-foot-high embankment - stalwart as the steep hills that give Ellicott City's historic district much of its character. Then in early September 2011 came the rains of Tropical Storm Lee, and in the dead of night a section of the wall that had stood since before the Civil War collapsed. Six cars parked along the wall were crushed or damaged. Parking spaces vanished under tons of stone quickly trucked in to shore up the embankment.
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