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NEWS
February 13, 2013
The beautiful pictures of historic buildings attracted me to reading "Closing the door on history" (Feb. 9), about how many of those structures are woefully short on maintenance due to budget cuts. To support the idea that the cost of such maintenance is over budget, the article focused on renovation of the Perry Point grist mill as a training site and as a small museum. But "to meet the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act, the agency would have to install an elevator.
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NEWS
By Mary Tilghman, mtilghman@tribune.com | May 18, 2014
Baltimore County Public Schools Superintendent Dallas Dance has offered his assurances that the Loch Raven Elementary School will not be demolished. Dance wrote in response to an April 30 letter from County Councilman David Marks and members of the General Assembly who represent the Towson area. "Let me assure you that we have gone on record that Loch Raven Elementary School will be a renovation/addition," he wrote. "There are no plans to demolish the building. " The 66-year-old school building hasn't welcomed elementary school students since 1982 but Dance last year proposed moving the children of Halstead Academy to a new school on the Loch Raven site.
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NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2010
The call echoed across Blue Mirrors just after 3:30 in the afternoon: "Smoke!" Within seconds, dark clouds choked the bar on The Block, the city's storied red-light district in the heart of downtown. Young women clad in slivers of lingerie grabbed coats and dashed outside, as the first firefighters streamed water onto the blaze that would grow to engulf four buildings on East Baltimore Street. "We were trying to get the girls out as soon as possible without getting any indecent exposure charges," said Jeff Jones, the owner of Blue Mirrors.
NEWS
By Mary K. Tilghman, mtilghman@tribune.com | May 8, 2014
Towson area state and local officials have written to Baltimore County Public Schools Superintendent Dallas Dance asking for assurances that the Loch Raven Elementary School building will be saved - and Dance's chief of staff says plans call for renovation and an addition at the school. The 66-year-old school building hasn't welcomed elementary school students since 1982 but Dance last year proposed moving the children of Halstead Academy to a new school on the Loch Raven site. Local and community officials have continued to express fears about demolishing the 1948 school, which currently operates as a community center and is protected as a historic landmark.
BUSINESS
June 6, 1999
A new tax incentive program for historic buildings has been initiated that will give homebuyers a credit equal to 25 percent of rehabilitation costs.The state mortgage credit certificate option -- called the Heritage Preservation Tax Credit Mortgage Credit Certificate Option -- allows an owner of a qualified historic residential or commercial property to receive a credit equal to 25 percent of the rehabilitation costs on the property.The owner can use the credit to lower the state income tax or transfer the credit to the institution that lent the rehab money.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | November 6, 1992
The Carroll County commissioners agreed yesterday that historic preservation is important, but Commissioner President Donald I. Dell questioned whether county money should be spent on it during tough economic times."
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | December 5, 1995
Some preservationists and homeowners fear that new Howard County tax incentives intended to encourage restoration historic buildings are not enough to discourage developers who want to demolish them.The Howard County Council "took the easy way out," said Scott Billigmeier, secretary of the Braebrooke Homeowner's Association near historic Ellicott City, which wanted the council instead to place a moratorium on the destruction of historic homes.But others say that the tax credit and a related 10-year tax freeze on historic buildings will help preservation efforts.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | October 9, 1991
Baltimore developer and remodeler Martin P. Azola has joined Ilex Construction and Development Inc. as a vice president.Mr. Azola, 44, a nationally recognized expert in adapting historic buildings for commercial and residential uses, will be responsible for expanding Ilex's activities in those areas.He joined Ilex less than six months after he was forced to file for NTC protection from creditors under Chapter 7 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. At the time, he said that he was adversely affected not only by the recession but also by changing federal tax laws that discourage private investment in historic restoration and adaptive reuse.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2004
In a debate that could determine how historic buildings are redeveloped across Baltimore County, Oella residents argued yesterday the merits of two bills that would allow a 19th-century mill to be converted into luxury apartments. More than a dozen residents appeared at a County Council work session to speak in favor of the bills, which would exempt historic buildings from some open space and parking requirements. Without the bills and the redevelopment of Oella Mill, they said, the historic centerpiece of their community would eventually crumble.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | March 2, 1998
The recent blaze that destroyed a 98-year-old building in Annapolis has kindled fears about the vulnerability of the city's treasure of historic buildings.Although fires have burned parts of historic Boston, Baltimore and Ellicott City over the past two centuries, few strong laws or fire prevention systems have been put into place to protect the oldest urban structures in what were the original 13 Colonies.Nationwide, fire laws have become more stringent, but most are designed to save lives, not structures.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | December 27, 2013
I used Russell Street to get to BWI this fall for a vacation. I made a mental note of the progress of the new Horseshoe Casino when I left. About 14 days later, the construction seemed to have doubled. Certainly the construction of this casino ranks as one of the highlights of change in Baltimore this past year. Some well-established neighborhoods saw substantial, but subtle advances in 2013. Not as obvious as the casino, an aged commercial core of Fells Point at Broadway, between Aliceanna and Fleet streets, emerged this year.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | December 5, 2013
Plans to turn a long, thin former cotton mill on the Jones Falls into apartments, offices and shopping space moved forward Wednesday, with a City Council committee endorsing a zoning change to enable Terra Nova Ventures' $19 million project on Clipper Mill Road. Terra Nova Ventures would convert the Whitehall Cotton Mill site into 27 apartments, about 25,000 sqare feet of office space, and 20,000 square feet of first-floor shopping, an area roughly twice the size of Belvedere Square.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2013
A group seeking to use the old Crownsville Hospital Center for nonprofit organizations will hold a public meeting on Thursday night. The meeting is planned for 7:30 p.m. at South Shore Elementary School, 1376 Fairfield Loop Road in Crownsville. A group of nonprofits organized as the Community Services Center at Crownsville, Inc. has been working for five years to get permission to use the property. Their goal is to create a campus of groups that offer veterans' services, community services and educational programs.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2013
A decade since the 2003 tropical storm that began its fiscal and operational woes, Market House in downtown Annapolis is expected to reopen in the coming weeks with a lineup of vendors selling falafel, gelato, sandwiches and crab cakes from the historic building. Since Tropical Storm Isabel blew through and flooded the building in 2003, the Market House has operated in fits and starts as the city struggled to repair the building and attract a stable lineup of vendors. Between renovations and lawsuits from former tenants, the city has spent millions of dollars on the Market House since 2003.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2013
More than a half-dozen food vendors will move into Annapolis's historic Market House at City Dock, city officials announced Friday. The vendors are: Yellowfin Seafood & Oyster Bar, a spinoff of the Yellowfin Steak and Fish House in Edgewater; the Hard Bean Café, which is moving from across the street; Carl's Corned Beef & Delicatessen and Midship Fresh Bar, also under Hard Bean's banner; Annapolis Organic Market and Good Life Smoothie Bar, both...
NEWS
February 13, 2013
The beautiful pictures of historic buildings attracted me to reading "Closing the door on history" (Feb. 9), about how many of those structures are woefully short on maintenance due to budget cuts. To support the idea that the cost of such maintenance is over budget, the article focused on renovation of the Perry Point grist mill as a training site and as a small museum. But "to meet the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act, the agency would have to install an elevator.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | December 5, 1995
Some preservationists and homeowners fear that new Howard County tax incentives intended to encourage restoration historic buildings are not enough to discourage developers who want to demolish them.The Howard County Council "took the easy way out," said Scott Billigmeier, secretary of the Braebrooke Homeowner's Association near historic Ellicott City, which wanted the council instead to place a moratorium on the destruction of historic homes.But others say that the tax credit and a related 10-year tax freeze on historic buildings will help preservation efforts.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts | November 15, 1990
Afraid that a new developer will try to buy the American Can Co. property on Boston Street and build a project the Canton community doesn't want, area residents have come up with their own plans for the site.Members of the Waterfront Coalition, a neighborhood group that monitors development in East Baltimore, unveiled plans last night that call for the former canning-factory property to be converted to a mixed-use project containing low-cost housing for the elderly, a supermarket, neighborhood-oriented shops and a public plaza.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2013
A 250-year-old grist mill near the mouth of the Susquehanna River has sat mostly vacant since the end of the Civil War, its thick stone walls serving no purpose but the protection of a few old tools. Though the building is historic - it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places decades ago - it is uncelebrated and receives few visitors. While many old mills are being restored, plans to develop the Cecil County property have stalled. The lack of interest in the old mill is partly due to its owner: the federal government.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2013
An old Victorian home, built of granite and dating to 1896, sits on the corner of two wide, tree-lined streets in Havre de Grace, welcoming visitors from near and far. Carol Nemeth, has been running her "Victorian Lady" as a full-time bed-and-breakfast since 1994, seven years after she and her then-husband, Jim, purchased it in 1987. The intention was never to turn it into a B&B, but rather to take a neglected property and bring it back to its original condition. The Nemeths had restored one home in town, but they wanted to try their hands at a larger place.
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