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By Sylvia Badger | June 18, 1991
FOR THE PAST 40 years, the Historic Annapolis Foundation (HAF) has been the watchdog of preservation and the interpreter of the historical and cultural heritage of Annapolis. It's a private, non-profit organization that has enjoyed many successes, thanks to the involvement of its members, corporations and government agencies.Last Saturday night, HAF hosted an elegant fund raiser that began with cocktails at The Brice House and ended with dinner on the terrace of the William Paca House, which was saved from demolition by HAF in 1965.
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NEWS
February 7, 2014
Monday, Feb. 10 Photo club The Digital Photography Club of Annapolis meets at 7 p.m. at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts, 801 Chase St. in Annapolis. Guest speaker will be Jay Fleming. Information: 410-267-0461 or digitalphotoclub.net. Tuesday, Feb. 11 Lecture Join historian Anthony Cohen as he recounts his journey retracing the route of the Underground Railroad from Maryland to Canada, held at 6 p.m. at Historic Annapolis, 18 Pickney St. Admission is $10, $8 for Historic Annapolis members and volunteers.
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NEWS
By JAMIE STIEHM and JAMIE STIEHM,SUN REPORTER | May 28, 2006
Gregory A. Stiverson, the most visible advocate of preservation in Annapolis, announced last week that he will leave in December when his four-year contract ends. Stiverson, president and chief executive of the Historic Annapolis Foundation, said he achieved his main goal with last month's grand opening of HistoryQuest at the St. Clair Wright Center. The foundation's board had spent a half-century discussing how to create a place where tourists, residents and the Naval Academy community could get an overview of the state capital's history.
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By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2014
Living in the shadow of the Naval Academy chapel, Ellis Richman and his wife, Dr. Ingrid Kohlstadt, are exactly where they want to be - nestled in the heart of historic Annapolis. Theirs is no ordinary house among a bevy of notable properties. Woven into the rich tapestry of Colonial architecture that marks Maryland's capital city landscape are the grande dames of Queen Anne-style homes erected in the Victorian era. The couple owns one of a twin pair of homes built in the early 1890s by lumber and hardware merchant Joseph S.M. Basil.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | December 25, 2002
The Historic Annapolis Foundation's chief executive resigned this week, noting philosophical differences over the nonprofit organization's direction. Brian Alexander, 51, unexpectedly announced he was leaving after two years as president and chief executive officer at a board meeting yesterday. "We just had philosophical differences about where we wanted to take the future," Alexander said yesterday. "I have a strong museum background and they want to focus on preservation." The 50-year-old foundation, which manages some of the city's most beloved landmarks and historic homes, chose Greg Stiverson, executive director of the Historic London Town and Gardens in Edgewater, to replace Alexander.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | November 1, 2000
For years, the oldest public building in the state has been closed to visitors, its charming, renovated interior packed with boxes of files and shelves of reference books. It sits on the State House lawn and houses the makeshift research center of the Historic Annapolis Foundation, which has long been credited with saving the city's historic downtown. But Brian Alexander, the foundation's new head, is making plans to open this Old Treasury Building, a cross-shaped 18th-century brick structure, and three other historic buildings nearby for the first time in recent memory.
NEWS
April 14, 1997
Slayton Show House chosen to be featured in magazine's tourThe Historic Annapolis Foundation's Slayton Show House has been selected by Traditional Home magazine to be featured on the magazine's 1997 Showhouse Tour.The house at 112 Duke of Gloucester St., which will be open for tours in Annapolis Friday through May 18, will be one of four prestigious show houses spotlighted on this national tour.Tickets for tours of the Slayton Show House will be $12 ($10 for prepaid or group tour purchases)
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | December 14, 1999
Armed with handouts, historical research and an architect's rendering of four possible site plans, several Annapolis preservationists implored the City Council last night not to demolish five 100-year-old buildings along West Street to build a parking garage.In an informal public hearing called by several aldermen before last night's City Council meeting, representatives from the Historic Annapolis Foundation, Ward One Residents Association and a member of the city's Historic Preservation Commission (HPC)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sun Staff | January 15, 2004
Trips Aviation sites -- including College Park's Aviation Museum -- mark the 100th anniversary of flight all year. page 18. Stage Director Bill Alexander talks about the Shakespeare Theatre's production of Henry 1V, Part 1, which stars Christopher Kelly as Prince Hal and Keith Baxter in the titular role. page 12. Outside Prepare for outdoor treks to Kenya, Nepal or Peru -- or just stay in shape -- practicing rock climbing at Earth Treks facilities in Timonium and Columbia. page 30. PICK OF THE WEEK What: "Maryland's First Silver: Eighteenth-Century Annapolis Silver," an exhibit that's part of the Historic Annapolis Antiques Show When: Tomorrow-Sunday Where: E. Leslie Medford Armory on Hudson Street in Annapolis Why: Because now is your chance to see some state artifacts, including these two teaspoons, given to the Historic Annapolis Foundation by Mrs. J.M.P.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | August 25, 1999
Annapolis Mayor Dean L. Johnson added his two cents yesterday on what should be done with the Anne Arundel Medical Center building when the hospital moves in 2001 from its prime downtown site to the city's outskirts: demolition.Johnson said he hopes hospital officials will pick a development plan that involves tearing down the eight-story building when they announce their choice in late September.Their decision will resolve a tense debate over redevelopment of the 5-acre site in the heart of the state capital.
NEWS
October 17, 2013
Author Erika Robuck, author of "Receive Me Falling," "Hemingway's Girl" and most recently "Call Me Zelda," will speak at the Abingdon library at 2 p.m. Sunday. Growing up in historic Annapolis, Robuck was surrounded by history. Her first novel, "Receive Me Falling," set in the Caribbean, focuses on a woman exploring her family's past. Unable to find an interested agent, Robuck self-published this novel and did her own promotion. With her second novel, "Hemingway's Girls," she attended a pitch-fest at a writer's conference and after three short minutes of "selling" her story to six agents in hopes of finding representation, she received six offers.
NEWS
September 20, 2013
Lighthouse tour A tour of the Thomas Point Shoal Lighthouse will be held at 9 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 28. Visitors can learn how lighthouse keepers lived, about other lighthouses on the Chesapeake Bay and how many still exist. Tickets are $70 per person. Reservations are required. Information: 415-362-7255 or email jeff@uslhs.org . Ling on North Korea Journalist Laura Ling will speak about her detainment in North Korea during a presentation at 6 p.m. Oct. 2, at Anne Arundel Community College's David S. Jenkins Gymnasium, 101 College Parkway in Arnold.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2013
Hundreds of people packed Annapolis City Hall on Thursday night to either praise or criticize plans for the future of downtown's City Dock. Depending on who was speaking, a new master plan for the dock could either spur downtown revitalization and please pedestrians or lead to parking headaches and tall buildings out of character with historic Annapolis. The public hearing before the city council drew so many people that the fire marshal asked some to listen to the meeting in the lobby, where testimony could be heard on speakers.
NEWS
July 21, 2013
I am disappointed that Mayor Josh Cohen has chosen the ploy of character assassination to obscure his own obtuse actions in promoting a zoning change to curry favor with a developer ("City Dock plans restore the luster of Annapolis' crown jewel," July 19). In 1969 the citizens of this city voted by a margin of 2-1 to support the "no" club. The same groups as are now involved in the fight against this zoning change - Historic Annapolis, maritime and business interests - proposed historic preservation and a strengthened maritime presence rather than the high rises ringing the waterfront supported by commercial interests.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2013
A fledgling organization devoted to the history of the Continental Congress — and creating a permanent home in Annapolis for examining that period in American history — took steps last week toward its goal. The Annapolis Continental Congress Society announced that it will hold its second festival Sept. 14-18 in the city, according to Mark Croatti, director of the organization. The first festival was held last year. In addition, a 16-member board of directors of the National Continental Congress Center Founders' Association has been formed with the goal of finding a permanent home for the organization.
FEATURES
By JoAnne C. Broadwater and JoAnne C. Broadwater,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 20, 1997
The best of the old and the new have been blended together with style and savvy in a thoroughly modern yet historic show house in the heart of Annapolis.Volunteers from the Historic Annapolis Foundation and interior designers from Maryland, Washington and New York have transformed a neglected 18th-century rowhouse into a designer showcase that is just right for a family of the '90s."Every historic structure does not have to be a museum," said Sharon Kennedy, executive co-chair for the Slayton Show House.
NEWS
June 30, 1994
The Historic Annapolis Foundation has undertaken a big and costly project: It involves practically rebuilding the crumbling Maynard-Burgess House, a shingled, wood-frame structure across the street from Annapolis City Hall that is believed to be the first home in Maryland's capital owned by a free black man.Like all restoration jobs, this one is likely to be unpredictable. As owners of old houses know, repairing one problem usually leads to the detection of others. And the Maynard-Burgess House has some very serious problems.
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