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NEWS
April 4, 2010
The Anne Arundel County Historical Society has opened the historic Benson-Hammond House and North Browse and Buy Shoppe at Aviation Boulevard and Andover Road in Linthicum for the season. Tours are 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Thursdays through Saturdays. Group tours are by appointment. Information: 410-760-9679.
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FEATURES
by Samantha Iacia and For the Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
Location: Central Baltimore City, less than two miles northwest of the Inner Harbor. The neighborhood is partially bounded by North Howard Street and Mount Royal Avenue to the east and Eutaw Place to the west. Average property listing price: For sales between January and July 2014, prices ranged from $80,000 to $416,000, with the average price being $233,000 for a 1,400-square-foot unit, according to Wayne Curtis, a real estate agent with RE/MAX Advantage Realty. Size and population: The nine-by-five-block area is home to approximately 2,000 residents, according to boltonhill.org.
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FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
Matt Nickasch's home is anything but typical - he lives in the tower of a repurposed grain silo in Locust Point. His condo on the 18th floor is marked as a "bin" instead of a unit, a nod to industrial days long gone. "I've always been a fan of historic reuse," said the 27-year old technical consultant for the federal government. "From the historical artifacts of the 1920s structure to all of the modern conveniences and amenities, I feel that it provides the best of all worlds - old and new. " There was, indeed, a former life for Silo Point as a grain terminal for the B&O Railroad - once considered the fastest grain elevator in the world.
NEWS
By Samantha Iacia and For the Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Location: North-central Baltimore City, partially bounded by Charles Village to the south, Loyola/Notre Dame to the north and York Road to the east. Average home listing price: $610,000 in 2013, says Tom Hobbs, president of the Guilford Association. Population: About 3,000, says Lynda Riley, secretary of the Guilford Association. The history: Named in honor of the 1781 Battle of Guilford Courthouse in North Carolina, the 296-acre estate passed from the family of Revolutionary War veteran William McDonald to Baltimore Sun founder Arunah S. Abell and eventually to the Roland Park Co. in 1911.
HEALTH
By Carrie Wells and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
The tiny brass ring bearing the initials "CC" presents a mystery: Did it belong to Charles Calvert, the third Baron Baltimore? And can the St. Mary's College of Maryland archaeologists who unearthed it ever prove its origins? The archaeologists discovered the ring this summer at a dig at a Charles County site that was a refuge for Piscataway Indians who were pushed from their homelands by other tribes and the arrival of European settlers in the 1600s. The small ring, perhaps designed to be worn on a pinkie finger, might have been a signet ring used to seal documents, said Julia King, the St. Mary's professor who oversaw the dig. King believes the ring might have been used by a representative of Charles Calvert to conduct diplomatic relations with the Piscataway tribe.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
Richard William Parsons, a retired Baltimore County librarian who also spent nearly 50 years as a residential advocate for Towson, died of cancer Monday at his Woodbine Avenue home. He was 87. Born in Victoria, British Columbia, he was the son of Thomas Parsons, a commandant of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and Laura Lyons, a homemaker. He earned a bachelor's degree in Slavic languages at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver and had a master's degree in library science from McGill University.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
- In the heart of this town on the old U.S. National Road in Western Maryland, a woman leans on the front desk of an 1890s-era hotel, her face a study in mixed emotions. Tina Storey loves her work as office manager of Failinger's Hotel Gunter, the grande dame of lodging in Frostburg with its polished oak staircase, Victorian settees and zillions of artifacts and displays that evoke the history of the so-called "Mountain Side of Maryland. " But she's still grieving the woman who revived the place.
SPORTS
By Amanda Ghysel and The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2014
Elizabeth McPherson hits the ground with a thud, an audible gasp of air escaping her lungs. But the rugby rookie's first thought when she lands is that her mother is going to kill her. "She was worried when my sister, who is 6 feet tall and larger-framed than I, played, so I'd been putting off telling her," jokes McPherson, 33, of Mount Vernon, who had told her mother only earlier that day that she had joined the Chesapeake Women's Rugby Club the...
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
More than a million visitors were expected to land in Baltimore this past week to commemorate the bicentennial of the writing of "The Star-Spangled Banner," many of them from out of state and in need of a place to stay. Across the city, hotels have pushed deals and patriotic specials, leaned on their staffs to memorize long lists of Star-Spangled Spectacular events, and brushed up on their own place in Baltimore history in an attempt to lure the War of 1812 buffs streaming into town.
NEWS
September 11, 2014
While Maryland is going to great lengths to commemorate the Fort McHenry battle from the War of 1812, little effort has gone into acknowledging several Savage residents: Commodore Joshua Barney in the Battle of Bladensburg or his son-in-law, Nathanial F. Williams, in the Battle of North Point. The Williams family developed what we know today as the Savage Mill, a cotton mill that allowed our ship industry to continue when the English ransomed our fledgling country's critical resource.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. -   Coming off their historic 9-2 homestand, the Orioles get back to playing AL East teams with a three-game series at Tropicana Field against the Tampa Bay Rays. That homestand was the Orioles' best homestand of 11 games or more since they went 10-2 during a span in June and July 1979. The Orioles have won five of six games in St. Pete this season and lead the season series against the Rays, 11-5. With a 9 ½ game lead in the AL East, the Orioles' final 23 games will be against division teams.
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