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By New York Times News Service | January 9, 1995
WASHINGTON -- In appointing an outspoken political supporter and former colleague from Georgia as the new House historian, Newt Gingrich is also gaining something no speaker has ever had: a personal "chronicler."The new historian, 47-year-old Christina Jeffrey, an assistant professor of political science at Kennesaw State College in Georgia, where Mr. Gingrich once taught, said that her husband, Robert, also a professor from Georgia, would be "chronicling the speaker and doing for the Republicans what academics did for FDR."
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By Will Fesperman, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
When a 60-year-old amateur historian died in February, dozens of Linthicum Heights residents decided they wanted to do something to remember the man who remembered and preserved the history of their community. Oscar "Skip" Booth was a local librarian, former president of the Ann Arrundell County Historical Society and had recently written his 100th historical "vignette" about Linthicum when he died unexpectedly of complications from a stroke. Soon after Booth's death, members of the Linthicum-Shipley Historic Association, a nonprofit that funds community projects, hatched the plan to build a memorial bench and place it along a local trail, said Kate Graf, secretary-treasurer of the group.
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FEATURES
January 5, 2002
Author Al Feldstein (above) has written 26 books and videotapes on the history of the state's westernmost counties. [Page 8d]
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
A grandson of the Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Samuel Eliot Morison has been charged with stealing nearly three boxes of documents that his grandfather used to write a 15-volume history of World War II commissioned by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. Authorities found some of the documents when they raided the Crofton home of Samuel L. Morison in May, according to federal charges unsealed Tuesday. Others had been put up for sale. They had been missing for more than a year. Morison, 69, appeared briefly in court following his arrest Tuesday morning, according to the U.S. attorney's office.
NEWS
September 20, 1991
Helene Goldsborough Graham, 88, a historian, genealogist and poet, died Wednesday at Union Memorial Hospital after a heart attack.A mass of Christian burial will be offered at 10 a.m. tomorrow at the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen, 5200 N. Charles St.Mrs. Graham, who lived on Somerset Road, was a genealogical researcher who also did heraldic art for her private clients. She lectured on these subjects and history, particularly the history of Maryland.She also wrote many articles on historical subjects and was co-author of a book, "You Will Find It in Maryland."
NEWS
February 8, 2006
Leonard Faber, a retired federal historian and editor, died of pancreatic cancer Saturday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Towson resident was 75. Born and raised in New England, he earned a degree in history at Boston University and was elected to Phi Beta Kappa. He served in the Navy during the Korean War, then earned a master's degree from Boston University. Years later, Mr. Faber earned a degree from George Washington University School of Law but did not go into practice, family members said.
NEWS
December 16, 2005
Louana M. Lackey, a ceramics historian and archaeologist, died of cancer Dec. 9 at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Charles Village resident was 79. Born Louana Mae Engelhart in Champaign, Ill., she earned a Bachelor of Arts degree and a doctorate from American University in Washington. Dr. Lackey researched potters in Central America, Spain and Italy, and wrote about the work of contemporary ceramic artists. Her scholarly articles appeared in American Antiquity, American Ceramics, British Archaeological Reports, Ceramics Monthly and Journal of the National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2004
K. Elizabeth Grim, a Catonsville amateur historian who lectured widely about her community's curiosities and people, died of a heart ailment Saturday at Charlestown Retirement Community. The former Catonsville resident was 95. Born Katherine Elizabeth Grim, the Catonsville native was a member of the Catonsville High School Class of 1926, the first class to graduate from the Bloomsbury Avenue campus. Miss Grim then began working at her grandparents' Frederick Road bakery. She was the bakery's bookkeeper and helped sell the cakes, pies, buns and breads her family members made.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | January 8, 1995
Dr. Sidney Kobre, a former newspaperman, professor, author and noted journalism historian who helped establish the Community College of Baltimore, died Thursday of cancer at his Pikesville residence. He was 87.The author of 16 books, he was perhaps best known for his work, "The Development of American Journalism" and "The Development of the Colonial Newspaper," published in 1944. His last book, "A Gallery of Black Journalists," written with his wife, Reva, was published last year.Maurine Beasley, a journalism professor at the College of Journalism at the University of Maryland, College Park, said that Dr. Kobre "was a most eminent scholar and was a revered figure in the field of journalism history.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 11, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Speaker Newt Gingrich, who dismissed the House historian Monday over her comments about an educational program on the Holocaust, knew about those statements before he hired her, an assistant to the former historian said on yesterday.But Mr. Gingrich said he did not know about the comments made by the former historian, Christina Jeffrey, in 1986.Dr. Jeffrey was hired quietly by Mr. Gingrich as House historian in mid-December and started work last week. She did not appear at her Washington office yesterday and did not respond to numerous telephone messages left at her home.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2014
Nolan H. Rogers, a former Duke University lacrosse star who later became a Maryland assistant attorney general and the official tour guide and historian for Oriole Park at Camden Yards , died May 2 of complications from cancer at Sinai Hospital. The longtime Mount Washington resident was 82. "Obviously, Nolan was present at the creation of the Camden Yards project, for which he did all of the land acquisition. He played a very important role in the development of the project," said Michael J. Frenz executive director of the Maryland Stadium Authority.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2014
Despite a federal judge's order that the Carroll County commissioners stop praying to Jesus at their meetings, Commissioner Robin Bartlett Frazier reached into history and summoned George Washington to aid her cause last week. "I beseech thee, for the sake of him in whom thou art well pleased, the Lord Jesus Christ, to admit me to render thee deserved thanks and praises for thy manifold mercies extended toward me," Frazier intoned, saying the words were once offered to God by Washington.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | February 12, 2014
The Baltimore Sun Sister Mary Jacinta Robson, a retired medical technologist who spent six decades at Mercy Medical Center, died there of congestive heart failure Feb. 7. She was 88. "She had been a beloved presence at the hospital for over 60 years and worked in the microbiology department for decades, and in later years was a hospital volunteer," said Sister Irene Callahan, a fellow member of Sisters of Mercy. Born Clara Jane Robson in Baltimore and raised on Ridgewood Avenue, she was the daughter of Alonzo Robson, a clerk, and Goldie Updegraff Robson, a homemaker.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2014
Frances G. Bell, who was considered an expert on the history of the village of Kingsville, where she lived her entire life, died Sunday of cancer at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. She was 91. The daughter of Frank C. Goettner, a Baltimore County Health Department worker, and Pauline Goettner, a seamstress, Frances Goettner was born in a second-floor bedroom of the Kingsville Inn, which had been owned by her grandparents. Today, the former hostelry in the 11700 block of Belair Road is a funeral home.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2013
Howard County was Richard Holmes' stage. When the Elkridge resident wasn't performing as Santa Claus at nursing homes, acting with local theater troupes or serving as a Howard historian on a local government access television show, he was displaying his expertise as a poultry enthusiast at county fairs. Mr. Holmes, 81, who passed away Sept. 26, will be remembered at a memorial service in December at Bethany United Methodist Church in Ellicott City, where he attended. Longtime friend Wendy Feaga said Mr. Holmes took part in several drama productions at the church — including one where he entered as Santa Claus on a scooter cart.
NEWS
By Bob Allen, For The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2013
The Civil War experience has been preserved over the past 150 years through a variety of media: books, newspaper accounts, films, drawings, paintings, diaries ... and fabrics. Columbia resident Mavis Slawson has made the latter her specialty as a textile historian and docent at the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in Frederick. She often gives presentations about the role of textiles in the Civil War, examining their role not only as practical materials but also in conveying and preserving culture across the battlefield.
NEWS
June 10, 2004
Henry Forbush Schorreck, a former National Security Administration historian and high school lacrosse coach, died of a heart attack Saturday while driving near Bradenton, Fla. The former Pasadena resident was 67. Mr. Schorreck was born in Baltimore and raised in the Hamilton neighborhood. He was a 1955 graduate of Friends School, and played midfield for its 1954 championship lacrosse team that was inducted into the school's Athletic Hall of Fame this year. He earned bachelor's and master's degrees in history from the University of Maryland, College Park and began his career as an NSA historian at Fort Meade in 1965.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,scott.calvert@baltsun.com | February 8, 2009
Excitement over the election of Barack Obama as the country's first black president should not mislead Americans into thinking that the country has solved its "problems of race," a prominent historian warned yesterday at a conference commemorating the 100th anniversary of the NAACP's founding. "I think in a year's time, we will begin to hear voices of discontent from elements of Obama's own constituency," David Levering Lewis told the modest audience during a question-and-answer session after his keynote speech at Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2013
Charles T. Mahan Jr., who spent 75 years painstakingly documenting the Maryland & Pennsylvania Railroad — better known as the Ma & Pa — that zig-zagged across Maryland from Baltimore to York, Pa., died Friday of kidney failure at Oak Crest Village. He was 88. "Every fan of the Ma & Pa will be eternally indebted to Charlie. He was a treasure," said Rudy Fischer, archivist of the Maryland & Pennsylvania Railroad Historical Society. "He documented its rolling stock, narrow- and later standard-gauge days.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2013
Orlando Ridout V, a historian of early Maryland buildings who explored crawl spaces and attics for their social and architectural details, died of pancreatic cancer complications April 6 at Anne Arundel Medical Center. The lifelong Annapolis resident was 59. "He literally wrote the book on Annapolis and its 18th-century architectural history," said Pete Lesher, chief curator at Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels. "He was one of those persons whose reputations literally did precede him. When I first met him, I expected a button-down look.
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