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NEWS
November 12, 2012
In a recent editorial you write that "any party that so ignores the interests of Hispanics, blacks, women and young people doesn't have a bright future" ("Diversity and the GOP," Nov. 8). I suppose that the key is determining what those interests are. If their interests are jobs, poverty and wealth accumulation, the election results suggest that the Democratic Party (or at least its presidential candidate) can ignore those interests and do just fine. At some point, this president is going to have to accept some responsibility for the high percentage of black and Latino unemployment, the high percentage of blacks and Latinos living in poverty and the decline in wealth of African-Americans and Latinos.
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NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
WASHINGTON -- The Democratic National Committee is pushing back on a comment made by a Republican spokeswoman that accused Gov. Martin O'Malley of "Hispandering" to Latino voters, calling the term "silly and offensive. " The term appeared in a BuzzFeed story about the steps Maryland's governor has made to court Hispanic voters as he considers seeking the Democratic nomination for president in 2016. "Winning elections is based on substance and so far Martin O'Malley is relying on Hispandering to win," Republican National Committee spokeswoman Izzy Santa said in a statement to BuzzFeed.
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NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | May 12, 2012
Campaign 2012 is now joined. The darts heretofore traded between the Obama and Romney camps now have extra-sharp tips. And it's going to stay this way through to Nov. 2. Most pundits predict a "razor close" and "particularly ugly" campaign. I concur. So, which storyline is a political junkie to follow in light of the 24/7 coverage given to this race for the ages? Which subplot is most instructive with regard to the ultimate outcome? A few thoughts for your consideration: •Youth.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2014
Latinos have for years made up one of the largest and fastest-growing groups in the country. They have also long been one of the most underrepresented minority groups in the federal workplace. Now a new effort is underway - at the highest level of federal hiring - to address that disparity. "There is tremendous growth, as you know, in the Latino community, and we see more and more young people graduating from university, and I really want to tap into those numbers," said Katherine Archuleta, the director of the federal Office of Personnel Management.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and John Rivera and Tom Bowman and John Rivera,Sun Staff Writers | April 19, 1994
Five years ago, in response to a barrage of discrimination complaints, studies and a class-action suit, the National Security Agency opened an office in Phoenix to recruit more Hispanic employees.But three years later, the Arizona office, staffed by a lone, 60-year-old black man, had hired only 11 Hispanics before it was closed for budget reasons.There were never any Hispanic recruiters or any analysis of the office's lackluster performance, according to a Pentagon inspector general's report released last week.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 28, 2001
THE COLUMBIA Association's Sister Cities Program will hold a Holiday Tertulia on Sunday at Howard Community College. Murray Simon, one of the event's organizers, explained that tertulia means social gathering in Spanish. Originally from East Harlem in New York, Simon lives in Long Reach village with his wife, Juana, and daughter, Sarah. He was an education adviser in Latin America and Africa for 25 years. "Since my wife is from Bolivia, I felt something was needed in Howard County for the growing Hispanic population," Simon said.
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Staff Writer | December 14, 1992
The great organ in the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen was silent yesterday afternoon. In its place were the words and music of representatives of 22 Hispanic communities in Baltimore, praising the Virgin Mary in heartfelt Spanish to the accompaniment of a half-dozen guitars.Roman Catholics of Spanish and Latin American heritage, many in national costume, came together to celebrate the 461-year-old tradition of Our Lady of Guadalupe. Archbishop William H. Keeler, Bishop John H. Ricard and numerous other vested clergymen, including a preacher from Washington, all spoke or sang in Spanish throughout a special Mass.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | May 5, 2004
LET'S PUT some signs up at Baltimore's city limits: Asian, African, European and black Caribbean immigrants not welcome. If members of those particular groups didn't know that before, they know it now. Baltimore's political honchos made it perfectly clear which immigrants they want to attract to the city: Hispanics. All others need not apply. So keen are Mayor Martin O'Malley and his crew about attracting Hispanic immigrants that they don't even mind doing something flagrantly illegal to do it. In an article by The Sun's Laura Vozzella that ran Monday, we learned Baltimore has set aside 15 grants of $3,000 each for Hispanics who want to buy homes in Charm City.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | September 12, 1993
Until recently, if Hispanics in Anne Arundel County wanted to buy corn masa for making tortillas, or chorizo, a spicy sausage, they had to hit the road.Although a few local markets sold a limited number of Hispanic foods, many items were unavailable. But then Juan Rivas and Santiago Morataya, cousins from the Maryland suburbs near Washington, passed through Annapolis and recognized an opportunity."I noticed that there was no Latino store here," Mr. Rivas said. "All the Latinos who live here have to go shopping in Washington, in Silver Spring, in Baltimore."
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 23, 2001
WASHINGTON - Mixed marriages, once rare in the United States, are surging, due largely to the willingness of Asians and Hispanics to marry outside their racial and ethnic groups. Nearly 34 years after the U.S. Supreme Court struck down the last laws prohibiting mixed-race marriages, the once-forbidden unions now total about 1.5 million. That's a tenfold increase over 1960. Adding Hispanics who marry outside their ethnic group brings the total of mixed marriages to 3 million, based on an analysis of recent census survey data.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2014
Baltimore police plan to deploy officers around city schools until the school year ends to ensure student safety amid recent racial tensions, while school officials joined civil rights leaders to urge students of different races to peacefully resolve differences. The actions followed recent threats and violent attacks on Latino students as well as the Memorial Day robbery and murder of a 15-year-old Mexican student who had dropped out of high school to help his family. Black and Hispanic leaders called for peace at a news conference Monday afternoon, before police deployed several officers to Federal Hill near Digital Harbor High School to deter groups of students from fighting in the streets.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2014
For the second time this week, family and friends of Oscar Torres gathered in public Friday to mourn his death, worrying, they say, that without holding vigils his killing will be forgotten and the person who shot him during a robbery will go free. About 50 people crammed into the front room of the family's rowhouse in Southwest Baltimore, huddled around a memorial of white roses and pictures. They sang and prayed in Spanish before Torres' mother, Ernestina Torres, led the group the few blocks north to where he was killed.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2014
Officials at BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport announced the hiring of its fire-and-rescue department's first Hispanic fire chief Thursday, shortly after acknowledging that they had terminated its acting chief, an African-American, the day before. The hiring of Victor N. Ferreira Jr., a 52-year-old retired Prince George's County fire official, comes amid complaints about diversity within the airport's fire department, following the hiring of an all-white class of firefighter recruits last month.
NEWS
March 2, 2014
For most of his first term in office, President Barack Obama tended to play down race as a factor in his policy decisions. "I'm not the president of black America," he once said, "I'm the president of the United States of America. " That unifying message was one he continually returned to in his efforts to heal the country's wounded economy during his first years in office, and as the nation's first black president he sometimes even seemed to go out of his way to avoid charges of racial favoritism.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2014
Breaking with his past reluctance to tailor policies to specific racial groups, President Barack Obama on Thursday launched a federal program aimed at improving the economic and educational status of young black and Hispanic men. The initiative, which does not require congressional approval, would direct $200 million in foundation money toward programs intended to close the racial achievement gap in schools and reduce the disproportionate unemployment...
NEWS
By Daniel Garza | February 10, 2014
Much like its English language counterpart, the White House's Spanish-language health care website, CuidadoDeSalud.gov, has been filled with technical issues, mistranslations and links to English-only pages and forms since its launch. It's a laughing stock, but the joke is on Hispanics and Latinos like myself. Beyond the faulty launch of the federal website, the Affordable Care Act penalizes the Hispanic-American community in Maryland in several serious ways. The end result that a law that was supposed to help us actually makes affordable and quality health care even harder to find.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | May 8, 2002
Although doctors have made progress toward improving health care for African-Americans, minorities continue to receive generally worse treatment than whites, with Hispanic- and Asian-Americans the biggest losers in the U.S. health care system, according to a new study. Dr. Karen Scott Collins, vice president of a New York-based medical research organization called the Commonwealth Fund, reported the conclusions of her national survey of 6,722 adults yesterday at the Pediatric Academic Societies' annual meeting at the Baltimore Convention Center.
NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff writer | December 2, 1991
John Schmidt makes an unlikely angel. With a rough beard, dressed inboots and jeans, he talks and lives like something of a rebel.But to the Hispanic population of Anne Arundel County, he may be God's messenger.Wednesday, Schmidt launched a Christmas tree sale, with half the proceeds going to help the county's Hispanic immigrants, who number somewhere between 6,800 and 14,000.The tree-selling venture openedat seven locations around the Baltimore area, including the parking lot of the Epiphany Episcopal Church in Odenton.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2014
Maryland's high school graduation rate has been climbing steadily for the past four years and reached nearly 85 percent — far above the national average — this past June, according to data released Tuesday. More students from every corner of the state are staying in school to earn a diploma, but the increases were most pronounced among Hispanic and African-American students. State education officials credited the passage of Maryland's Dream Act, which gave hope to Hispanic students who want to attend college in the state, as one of the factors for the 2.5 percentage point increase in the graduation rate for Hispanics.
HEALTH
January 22, 2014
Black and Hispanic men are shouldering more medical costs because of health inequalities and they, their families and society are suffering from the burden, according to a new study from Johns Hopkins University's Bloomberg School of Public Health. Health disparities among African American men and Hispanic men cost the economy more than $450 billion between 2006 and 2009, the study found. Black men incurred about three quarters of the costs. The study, published in the International Journal of Men's Health, incorporated the direct cost of medical care and the indirect costs such as lower productivity and early death among black, Hispanic, Asian and white men. "These stark findings underscore the fact that we can't afford to overlook men's health disparities that exist in this country," Roland J. Thorpe, Jr., lead author of the study and assistant professor at Hopkins and director of the Program for Research on Men's Health in the Hopkins Center for Health Disparities Solutions.
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