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Hispanic Population

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By DIANA NGUYEN | Capital News Service | January 23, 2010
WASHINGTON - The Maryland Hispanic population has increased by at least 65 percent since the 2000 Census, contributing to increasing ethnic diversity nationally, according to a new U.S. Census Bureau report. There are 375,830 Hispanics living in Maryland as of 2007, an increase from 227,916 in 2000, according to Census Bureau data analyzed by the Maryland Department of Planning and released Wednesday. After Hispanics, Asian immigration ranks second with a 29 percent increase. The Census Bureau American Community Survey reported that the massive increase in immigration from Latin American and Asian countries over the last 40 years "has been the major force changing the racial and ethnic composition of the American population."
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2014
Latinos have for years made up one of the largest and fastest-growing groups in the country. They have also long been one of the most underrepresented minority groups in the federal workplace. Now a new effort is underway - at the highest level of federal hiring - to address that disparity. "There is tremendous growth, as you know, in the Latino community, and we see more and more young people graduating from university, and I really want to tap into those numbers," said Katherine Archuleta, the director of the federal Office of Personnel Management.
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NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2011
The Hispanic population's growth in Maryland and several other states far outpaced previous estimates, according to an analysis of census data released this week. In Maryland, the 2010 census counted about 46,000 more Hispanic individuals than the Census Bureau had estimated were in the state, according to the Pew Hispanic Center, a nonpartisan group that studies the country's Hispanic population. At 10.7 percent, Maryland's was the fourth-largest underestimate in the country, behind Alabama, Louisiana and Kansas, the center reported this week.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2012
Amid the quaint brick storefronts of Westminster's Main Street, Lily's Mexican Market sells Virgin of Guadalupe statues, sacks of dried beans and paddle-shaped cactus leaves. A mile away, the aisles of Las Palmeras grocery store are stocked with Salvadoran cheeses and pastries. A nearby Catholic church draws more than 200 people to a Spanish Mass each Sunday. Mexican and Central American immigrants have flocked to Carroll County over the past decade, drawn by pastures and orchards that remind them of the rural villages in which they were raised.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Sun Staff Writer | May 7, 1995
Weather permitting, Chico Castillo and 20 other Hispanic men play soccer behind Talbott Springs Elementary School in Columbia's Village of Oakland Mills several days a week.At 7 p.m. each Saturday, Cuban-born Maria Luisa Gaston joins about 100 parishioners at a Spanish-language Mass at St. John the Evangelist Roman Catholic Church in the Wilde Lake Interfaith Center.And in the county's public school classrooms, scores of Spanish-speaking children apply themselves painstakingly to the task of learning English as a second language.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | May 6, 1997
More than any other village in Columbia -- indeed, more than any other neighborhood in Howard County -- immigrants from Mexico, El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras call Oakland Mills village home.From the start, Columbia has tried to be synonymous with diversity. But for decades that meant African-Americans mixed with the majority white population.Now, after nearly 30 years, a diversity that is not only multi-hued, but also multilingual and multicultural, is taking hold in the affluent planned community -- a development that has caused a variety of adjustments.
NEWS
By Antero Pietila and Antero Pietila,SUN STAFF | May 29, 2004
Exactly four weeks ago yesterday, a Mexican grill replaced a failed kosher restaurant on Reisterstown Road near Seven Mile Lane. Mari Luna Mexican Grill - named after the Mexican-born owner's wife - is the latest sign of the growing ethnic diversity along Northwest Baltimore's Park Heights Avenue and Reisterstown Road corridors, from Belvedere Avenue to the county line. Jews and African-Americans are the dominant population groups, but Russians and Caribbeans have a substantial presence.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2012
Amid the quaint brick storefronts of Westminster's Main Street, Lily's Mexican Market sells Virgin of Guadalupe statues, sacks of dried beans and paddle-shaped cactus leaves. A mile away, the aisles of Las Palmeras grocery store are stocked with Salvadoran cheeses and pastries. A nearby Catholic church draws more than 200 people to a Spanish Mass each Sunday. Mexican and Central American immigrants have flocked to Carroll County over the past decade, drawn by pastures and orchards that remind them of the rural villages in which they were raised.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | November 28, 2000
Baltimore Health Commissioner Dr. Peter L. Beilenson announced yesterday his department will triple its bilingual staff to address the problem of Hispanics receiving inadequate health care. He was responding to a Health Department report released yesterday that documented the failure of city medical institutions to adequately reach out and treat Baltimore's Hispanic population - the fastest-growing ethnic group in the city. The Health Department now has eight Spanish speakers among its 1,300 employees, Beilenson said in practiced Spanish yesterday.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2012
As the sounds of Latin music filled the Timonium Fairgrounds, Efren Perez and his workers helped fill the bellies of hungry festival-goers with tenderly grilled flank steak cooked at his vendor booth. The 37-year-old owns a Colombian restaurant, Rancho Mateo, in Paterson, N.J., and, on weekends, looks to make extra money by serving food at Latin festivals. This year, he added Baltimore County to his itinerary, where he served food as part of the first Maryland Latin Festival. "It's a big community," Perez said as he looked around at the vendors representing other Latin American countries.
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2011
The Hispanic population's growth in Maryland and several other states far outpaced previous estimates, according to an analysis of census data released this week. In Maryland, the 2010 census counted about 46,000 more Hispanic individuals than the Census Bureau had estimated were in the state, according to the Pew Hispanic Center, a nonpartisan group that studies the country's Hispanic population. At 10.7 percent, Maryland's was the fourth-largest underestimate in the country, behind Alabama, Louisiana and Kansas, the center reported this week.
NEWS
February 20, 2011
The Census Bureau reported recently what many people have long suspected: Over the last decade, the growth of Maryland's population has largely been driven by Hispanics, who increasingly are settling in suburban areas of the state. The data don't say how many of them are immigrants, but it's a good bet that many are. At the same time, the report noted, the population of Baltimore City, which has been declining for decades, fell by another 30,000 residents since 2001 — more than half again as much as city officials had expected.
NEWS
December 22, 2010
It is good news Maryland's population has grown by 480,000 ( "Maryland population grows by 480,000," Dec. 22). That's a sizeable jump and will mean more taxes for the state, more consumers to purchase goods and services and increased funding to our pension programs. However, there was no mention as to the legal status of the expanding Hispanic population. The Latinos make up about 7 percent of Maryland's population and now account for 40 percent of the state's growth since the last census was taken.
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2010
Buoyed by a growing Hispanic population and the availability of steady federal jobs, Maryland grew by 9 percent in the last decade - faster than most Eastern states, according to new Census Bureau data. Maryland's population grew by 480,000 residents, to 5,773,552, according to data released Tuesday. With a growth rate slightly lower than the national average, Maryland maintained its ranking as the nation's 19th-most-populous state - and retained its seats in the House of Representatives.
NEWS
By Diana Nguyen and Diana Nguyen,Capital News Service | January 24, 2010
WASHINGTON - -The Maryland Hispanic population has increased by at least 65 percent since the 2000 census, contributing to increasing ethnic diversity nationally, according to a new U.S. Census Bureau report. There are 375,830 Hispanics living in Maryland as of 2007, an increase from 227,916 in 2000, according to Census Bureau data analyzed by the Maryland Department of Planning and released last week. After Hispanics, Asian immigration ranks second with a 29 percent increase. The Census Bureau American Community Survey reported that the huge increase in immigration from Latin America and Asia over the last 40 years "has been the major force changing the racial and ethnic composition of the American population."
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