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By Sarah Tan, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2010
In an effort to help Hispanic parents, especially those new to the country, get involved in the school system, Elisa Montalvo, a Hispanic achievement specialist for Howard County schools, developed an academy for them. "We have many parents who are newcomers to the country, and they don't necessarily know how to assist the children and be better partners with the schools," Montalvo said. "We invite parents at the elementary level because it's easier for parents to learn the strategies while the kids are small."
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NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2014
Baltimore police plan to deploy officers around city schools until the school year ends to ensure student safety amid recent racial tensions, while school officials joined civil rights leaders to urge students of different races to peacefully resolve differences. The actions followed recent threats and violent attacks on Latino students as well as the Memorial Day robbery and murder of a 15-year-old Mexican student who had dropped out of high school to help his family. Black and Hispanic leaders called for peace at a news conference Monday afternoon, before police deployed several officers to Federal Hill near Digital Harbor High School to deter groups of students from fighting in the streets.
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NEWS
November 23, 2000
Baltimore's Hispanic community is trying to collect $4,300 this weekend to fly the body of Honduran immigrant Juan Angel Murrillo home for a funeral Monday. The 40-year-old father of six was fatally shot Sunday in the 2100 block of Barclay St. during an attempted robbery, police said. Murrillo had been in the United States for a month and was working at odd jobs so he could send money to his family in Honduras, said Enrique Rivadeneira, owner of the Latin Palace night club and president of the Hispanic Business Association.
NEWS
May 16, 2014
Box of Rain Volunteers are needed to act as mentors for the Box of Rain organization's Big Sailor/Little Sailor Program and to serve as sailing instructors. Donations of funds and safety boats for sailing classes, boats, boating equipment — especially life preservers and gear — are also needed. Information: 443-254-0024. Commission for Women The Anne Arundel County Commission for Women seeks volunteers to help address issues important to women and families in the county.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | December 24, 1998
Annapolis Mayor Dean L. Johnson is taking his "City Hall Comes to You" program to the city's growing Hispanic community next month, the first in the series to target an ethnic group rather than a neighborhood.The forum, scheduled for 7 p.m. Jan. 13 at the Griscomb building in Truxton Park, is part of the series that Johnson began in February. The previous six or seven meetings have targeted communities such as Eastport and Parole.The Hispanic population is "a growing part of Annapolis," Johnson said yesterday.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | February 25, 2001
Anne Arundel County's Hispanic population wasn't even a blip on the marketing radar 10 years ago, but today its growth has caught the attention of public and private agencies eager to understand how best to deliver their messages to this expanding community. From 1960 to 1980, the county's Hispanic population more than doubled, from 2,273 to 4,595. By 1990, that number had risen to 6,815, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. But how much the county's Hispanic population has grown since then is unknown.
NEWS
By Amy Oakes and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | May 10, 1999
Privacy at the cramped Centro de la Comunidad office in East Baltimore is a luxury. Battleship-gray filing cabinets serve as room dividers and crude conversation buffers.For three years, the staff at the outreach and social service center has managed to work there, practically whispering during job placement or family counseling sessions. But as Baltimore's Hispanic community has grown to an estimated 40,000, the center, in the 2700 block of Pulaski Highway, has been pressed to expand.With a long sought-after $200,000 state grant awarded at the end of the legislative session, the center will undergo renovations this summer that will almost double its size.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2002
Pfc. Sandra Argueta-Copley can talk to abused Hispanic women in a way few officers can - she speaks their language. Copley, 29, has woven her Spanish-language skills with six years of policing experience and a personal interest in domestic violence issues to form a program aimed at lifting Hispanic women from abusive situations. Her initiative will be recognized tomorrow with a community service award, one of the top honors given by the Howard County Police Department. As a midnight-shift patrol officer and an on-call volunteer for the Domestic Violence Center, Copley said she passes out her home, work, cell phone and pager numbers to any woman she thinks might be a victim of abuse.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | November 7, 1995
To bridge a cultural gap between Baltimore police and the city's growing Hispanic population, officers in one district were given booklets yesterday to help them learn basic Spanish.Called "Speedy Spanish for Police Personnel," the small packet offers translations for everything from a routine traffic stop to domestic disputes to dealing with crowd control. It also translates the Miranda warning."It is difficult for us to get the information we need to be effective," said Maj. John E. Gavrilis, commander of the Southeastern District, where several Hispanic groups have settled.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2000
Misha Callahan gently prods 9-year-old Daniel to focus on the math problems in front of him. "Sit up straight," she tells the boy from El Salvador. His grip on the pencil tightens. Just before lunch, Callahan asks some Spanish-speaking pupils if they remembered to bring money for a field trip later in the week. "My mother doesn't have any money," one girl says. Before the school day ends at Germantown Elementary in Annapolis, Callahan finds a ride home for Lucia, reassures a mother that her son is not misbehaving in kindergarten and consults with school staff members about a pupil's repeated absences.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2012
As the sounds of Latin music filled the Timonium Fairgrounds, Efren Perez and his workers helped fill the bellies of hungry festival-goers with tenderly grilled flank steak cooked at his vendor booth. The 37-year-old owns a Colombian restaurant, Rancho Mateo, in Paterson, N.J., and, on weekends, looks to make extra money by serving food at Latin festivals. This year, he added Baltimore County to his itinerary, where he served food as part of the first Maryland Latin Festival. "It's a big community," Perez said as he looked around at the vendors representing other Latin American countries.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | November 19, 2011
Since the congressional supercommittee appears unable, or unwilling, to take a lesson from Indiana or Virginia -- where Republican governors have made spending cuts and delivered budget surpluses without damaging the social safety net -- members might wish to consider Puerto Rico and what its governor, Luis Fortuno is doing. Mr. Fortuno is Puerto Rico's first Republican governor in 42 years. In 2009 when he took office, the U.S. territory had a $3.3 billion budget deficit. Three years earlier, Moody's Investors Service downgraded the commonwealth's bond rating to junk status while in deep recession.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2011
A federal judge has shuttered a Baltimore couple's businesses and frozen most of their assets after the Federal Trade Commission accused the prominent pair — well known within the city's Hispanic community — of illegally selling slipshod immigration services to hundreds of local Latinos. Manuel and Lola Alban, ages 70 and 66 respectively, are accused in court documents of lying about their qualifications and taking hundreds of thousands of dollars from more than 800 foreigners for services they weren't authorized to perform, such as filing documents required for U.S. residency.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2010
After a man was beaten to death early Saturday morning in what police call a hate crime— the latest in a string of attacks against Hispanics in the area — officers and neighborhood volunteers walked door-to-door to promote a dialogue with police and the Spanish-speaking community. Saturday night, police had made an arrest in the overnight killing in the 200 block of N. Kenwood Ave. Officers were called at about 2:15 a.m. for an assault and found 51-year-old Martin Reyez suffering from severe head and facial trauma after he was beaten with a piece of wood.
NEWS
By Sarah Tan, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2010
In an effort to help Hispanic parents, especially those new to the country, get involved in the school system, Elisa Montalvo, a Hispanic achievement specialist for Howard County schools, developed an academy for them. "We have many parents who are newcomers to the country, and they don't necessarily know how to assist the children and be better partners with the schools," Montalvo said. "We invite parents at the elementary level because it's easier for parents to learn the strategies while the kids are small."
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,Sun Reporter | August 22, 2008
Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold, who has made a priority of cracking down on illegal immigrants, reallocated money yesterday initially intended for an Annapolis organization that helps Hispanic residents after its leaders turned down the money. Leopold announced that he was giving $14,000 budgeted for a citizenship class at the nonprofit Centro de Ayuda-or Center of Help - to a church that is part of an alliance of Hispanic clergy. In an Aug.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun reporter | May 19, 2008
When Enrique Carrillo and his wife moved to the area two years ago from Detroit, they had one non-negotiable requirement: Their new house had to have a backyard large enough to host the couple's Pachanga Cubana. And so yesterday, for the second year in a row, a bit of Cuba found its place deep in the Ellicott City woods. Politicians mixed with bankers and business executives to drink mojitos and discuss how they could be of better service to the region's growing Hispanic community. The word pachanga means "party" in Spanish, and the atmosphere was certainly festive, with guests gathered under tents on the Carrillos' verdant lawn and the smell of mint from the mojitos pervading the air. But for the Carrillos, there was another reason to invite people over on a Sunday afternoon for Cuban sandwiches and croquettes: the opportunity to make inroads in a community that is becoming economically powerful in the region.
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