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NEWS
July 27, 2005
On Monday, July 25, 2005, NATHAN HIRSH SUMMERFIELD, loving brother of Myer Summerfield and Louise S. Kowins both of Baltimore, MD, devoted brother-in-law of Rita G. Summerfield and the late Joseph Lee Kowins, beloved uncle of Alan and Debbie Summerfield and Marc and Sindi Summerfield and the late Anita K. Braunstein. Also survived by many generations of loving great-nieces and nephews. Services at SOL LEVINSON & BROS., INC., 8900 Reisterstown Rd. at Mt. Wilson Lane on Wednesday, July 27 at 10 A.M. Interment at Hebrew Friendship Cemetery, 3600 E. Baltimore St. Please omit flowers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | May 24, 2007
Eleanor Betty Hirsh, an educator who championed preservation of the Lloyd Street Synagogue and was a founder of the Jewish Historical Society, died of cancer Sunday at her Pikesville home. She was 83. Born Eleanor Betty Rosenthal in Baltimore and raised in Mount Washington, she was a 1940 graduate of Forest Park High School and earned a bachelor's degree in education from Goucher College. She was known by her initials, E.B. She joined Baltimore Hebrew Congregation, and in 1975 became the second woman to serve as its president.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | May 24, 2007
Eleanor Betty Hirsh, an educator who championed preservation of the Lloyd Street Synagogue and was a founder of the Jewish Historical Society, died of cancer Sunday at her Pikesville home. She was 83. Born Eleanor Betty Rosenthal in Baltimore and raised in Mount Washington, she was a 1940 graduate of Forest Park High School and earned a bachelor's degree in education from Goucher College. She was known by her initials, E.B. She joined Baltimore Hebrew Congregation, and in 1975 became the second woman to serve as its president.
NEWS
July 27, 2005
On Monday, July 25, 2005, NATHAN HIRSH SUMMERFIELD, loving brother of Myer Summerfield and Louise S. Kowins both of Baltimore, MD, devoted brother-in-law of Rita G. Summerfield and the late Joseph Lee Kowins, beloved uncle of Alan and Debbie Summerfield and Marc and Sindi Summerfield and the late Anita K. Braunstein. Also survived by many generations of loving great-nieces and nephews. Services at SOL LEVINSON & BROS., INC., 8900 Reisterstown Rd. at Mt. Wilson Lane on Wednesday, July 27 at 10 A.M. Interment at Hebrew Friendship Cemetery, 3600 E. Baltimore St. Please omit flowers.
NEWS
March 2, 2005
Editor: Trif Alatzas, 410-332-6154, trif.alatzas@baltsun.com Reporters: Stacey Hirsh, 410-332-6585, stacey.hirsh@baltsun.com Blanca Torres, 410-332-6065, blanca.torres@baltsun.com News assistant: Tony Waytekunas, 410-332-6147, tony.waytekunas@baltsun.com Advertising: Angela Lamont, 410-332-6114, angela.lamont@baltsun.com Submissions: To submit ideas and items for this section, e-mail to working@baltsun.com, or write to Working, 501. N. Calvert St., Baltimore, Md., 21278-0001, or fax to 410-783-2617
NEWS
August 3, 1997
Charles H. Bauer, 92, newspaper photographerCharles H. Bauer, a longtime photographer for the old Baltimore News American, died Thursday of complications from Alzheimer's disease at Genesis ElderCare on Liberty Road. He was 92.The Baltimore native, who retired from the newspaper in 1977 after a 46-year career, was especially proud of his scenic shots of Baltimore in the 1950s, said his daughter, Tricia Bauer of West Redding, Conn.Before moving to Genesis, Mr. Bauer, an avid golfer, lived in the Milford Mill area with his wife of 47 years, the former Muriel Switzer.
NEWS
March 31, 2003
George E. Hamilton Jr., 87, a Maryland native who helped lead Smithfield Foods' transformation from a local pork-packing company into a national force, died Tuesday at a nursing home in Smithfield, Va. Mr. Hamilton was president of the company's original subsidiary, Smithfield Packing Co., from 1970 to 1994. Under his leadership and that of Chief Executive Officer Joseph W. Luter III, Smithfield Foods made its first big purchase, buying out Gwaltney of Smithfield - at the time, its principal mid-Atlantic competitor.
BUSINESS
By Graeme Browning | April 1, 1991
When Allan Hirsh III boards a plane bound for Bologna, Italy, this afternoon he'll be hoping for the same kind of luck he had seven years ago.In April 1984, Mr. Hirsh, president of Baltimore-based Ottenheimer Publishers Inc., and his father, Allan Hirsh Jr., the company's chairman, were wandering the aisles at the Bologna International Children's Book Fair, the largest convention of children's book publishers in the world.Little had caught their fancy during the several days they had spent at the fair, and they were looking at the displays once more before leaving for home.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | September 12, 2004
IT'S SAID that play is the work of children. Now we're taking their jobs away. That's the thesis of Kathy Hirsh-Pasek and Roberta Michnick Golinkoff. The two developmental psychologists were at the Port Discovery children's museum Thursday. They came to promote play. They had an appreciative audience repeating after them: "Play equals learning! Play equals learning!" Hirsh-Pasek and Golinkoff have co-authored a delightful book, Einstein Never Used Flash Cards, which decries our Roadrunner society's fixation on teaching kids to read and compute before they're potty-trained, prepping them for Harvard before they can tie their shoes, viewing a "Baby Einstein" video before they know their colors.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | September 10, 1992
Ithink I can I think I can I think I can," chants the Little Engine That Could. And it can."Someday, my prince will come," promises Cinderella. And he arrives."I'm going to lose this $!-&! game," swears the big-league pitcher. And he does.That's the thing about talking to yourself. When it's positive, there's nothing better. But when it's negative, well, it might be better to hold your tongue.Apart from the sort of monologues carried on by psychotics and John McEnroe on center court, talking to yourself is normal.
NEWS
March 2, 2005
Editor: Trif Alatzas, 410-332-6154, trif.alatzas@baltsun.com Reporters: Stacey Hirsh, 410-332-6585, stacey.hirsh@baltsun.com Blanca Torres, 410-332-6065, blanca.torres@baltsun.com News assistant: Tony Waytekunas, 410-332-6147, tony.waytekunas@baltsun.com Advertising: Angela Lamont, 410-332-6114, angela.lamont@baltsun.com Submissions: To submit ideas and items for this section, e-mail to working@baltsun.com, or write to Working, 501. N. Calvert St., Baltimore, Md., 21278-0001, or fax to 410-783-2617
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | September 12, 2004
IT'S SAID that play is the work of children. Now we're taking their jobs away. That's the thesis of Kathy Hirsh-Pasek and Roberta Michnick Golinkoff. The two developmental psychologists were at the Port Discovery children's museum Thursday. They came to promote play. They had an appreciative audience repeating after them: "Play equals learning! Play equals learning!" Hirsh-Pasek and Golinkoff have co-authored a delightful book, Einstein Never Used Flash Cards, which decries our Roadrunner society's fixation on teaching kids to read and compute before they're potty-trained, prepping them for Harvard before they can tie their shoes, viewing a "Baby Einstein" video before they know their colors.
NEWS
March 31, 2003
George E. Hamilton Jr., 87, a Maryland native who helped lead Smithfield Foods' transformation from a local pork-packing company into a national force, died Tuesday at a nursing home in Smithfield, Va. Mr. Hamilton was president of the company's original subsidiary, Smithfield Packing Co., from 1970 to 1994. Under his leadership and that of Chief Executive Officer Joseph W. Luter III, Smithfield Foods made its first big purchase, buying out Gwaltney of Smithfield - at the time, its principal mid-Atlantic competitor.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | April 29, 1998
Saturday night in downtown Baltimore, Peggy Kolodny and her husband topped off a happy visit to the city's Whitbreaded waterfront by driving through a squall in one of its parking garages. Let's put it this way - they didn't exactly sail out of the place.They got in their cars at 11:15 p.m. and did not exit the East Pratt Street garage until 12:45 a.m. The line of traffic did not move for 10 minutes at a time. One couple had time to get out, kick up the stereo and dance. (Apparently, the garage's cashier had problems that brought traffic to a halt.
NEWS
August 3, 1997
Charles H. Bauer, 92, newspaper photographerCharles H. Bauer, a longtime photographer for the old Baltimore News American, died Thursday of complications from Alzheimer's disease at Genesis ElderCare on Liberty Road. He was 92.The Baltimore native, who retired from the newspaper in 1977 after a 46-year career, was especially proud of his scenic shots of Baltimore in the 1950s, said his daughter, Tricia Bauer of West Redding, Conn.Before moving to Genesis, Mr. Bauer, an avid golfer, lived in the Milford Mill area with his wife of 47 years, the former Muriel Switzer.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | May 25, 1997
M. Hirsh Goldberg seems honestly mystified by the idea that anyone would find something funny about the idea of a public relations man positioning himself as a champion of truth-telling.But the former press secretary to Theodore R. McKeldin (during the end of his last mayoral term) and Gov. Harry R. Hughes simply cannot see the irony in his call for a National Honesty Day."It's unfortunate that people have these perceptions," he says finally, his round face a study in guilelessness, his gaze direct from behind his glasses.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | April 29, 1998
Saturday night in downtown Baltimore, Peggy Kolodny and her husband topped off a happy visit to the city's Whitbreaded waterfront by driving through a squall in one of its parking garages. Let's put it this way - they didn't exactly sail out of the place.They got in their cars at 11:15 p.m. and did not exit the East Pratt Street garage until 12:45 a.m. The line of traffic did not move for 10 minutes at a time. One couple had time to get out, kick up the stereo and dance. (Apparently, the garage's cashier had problems that brought traffic to a halt.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | April 1, 1994
A column in yesterday's editions of The Sun contained incorrect information about movie and television projects involving Alan Sereboff. Mr. Sereboff is associate producer of the film "In the Living Years." The column also incorrectly listed Mario Van Peebles as the star of the film. Mr. Sereboff also has agreed to co-produce a public service announcement for Court Appointed Special Advocates for Children.The Sun regrets the errors.Today is not only Good Friday and April Fool's Day, but it's the natal day of two friends, Baltimore attorney Frances Reaves and City Councilman Mike Curran.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | April 1, 1994
A column in yesterday's editions of The Sun contained incorrect information about movie and television projects involving Alan Sereboff. Mr. Sereboff is associate producer of the film "In the Living Years." The column also incorrectly listed Mario Van Peebles as the star of the film. Mr. Sereboff also has agreed to co-produce a public service announcement for Court Appointed Special Advocates for Children.The Sun regrets the errors.Today is not only Good Friday and April Fool's Day, but it's the natal day of two friends, Baltimore attorney Frances Reaves and City Councilman Mike Curran.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | September 10, 1992
Ithink I can I think I can I think I can," chants the Little Engine That Could. And it can."Someday, my prince will come," promises Cinderella. And he arrives."I'm going to lose this $!-&! game," swears the big-league pitcher. And he does.That's the thing about talking to yourself. When it's positive, there's nothing better. But when it's negative, well, it might be better to hold your tongue.Apart from the sort of monologues carried on by psychotics and John McEnroe on center court, talking to yourself is normal.
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