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NEWS
By Antero Pietila and Antero Pietila,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2004
Just hours before the Hippodrome Theatre's opening gala yesterday, Howard Street jeweler Alvin Levi's upbeat mood matched the springlike break in the weather. "Most people don't get it," Levi said of the Hippodrome, just a block from his store. "They view it as art and entertainment and don't realize that it's the rebirth of a community." Hope sprang eternal yesterday in Baltimore's erstwhile retail hub, where hit theater productions once created long ticket lines and four big department stores - all now a distant memory - catered to a bewildering variety of shopping needs.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
The redevelopment of a former Army post in the Blue Ridge Mountains might not appear to have much in common with the renovation of the historic Hippodrome Theatre on Baltimore's west side. Spanning roughly 600 acres in Western Maryland's Washington County, Fort Ritchie envelops two small lakes and is speckled with spruce trees and gray stone buildings dating to the 1920s. It's hardly a theater in a gritty part of downtown. But like the Hippodrome , the installation presents a daunting set of questions - multiple stakeholders with competing interests, historic considerations, a difficult location.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Review by Edward Gunts | February 8, 2004
The show begins long before the curtain rises. That's all one needs to know to appreciate the dramatic transformation of Baltimore's Hippodrome Theatre, which reopens Tuesday after a $62 million restoration and modernization. The architects and artisans who labored for months to rescue the historic theater at 12 N. Eutaw St. didn't simply return it to its original appearance, though that certainly was done. They made it the centerpiece of a larger environment in which every inch works to prepare audiences for the Broadway-style performances and other shows that they have come to see. The result is an urban entertainment center with the splendor and opulence one associates with great theaters of the past and a backstage that can accommodate the most elaborate traveling productions.
ENTERTAINMENT
Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2014
As in any major city, Baltimore and its bars benefit from a hot ticket. Whether it is the Orioles' opening day or a Justin Timberlake and Jay Z concert downtown, these events rarely fail to draw large crowds. In the process, many attendees find time to patronize bars in the neighborhoods they visit. In late February, it was easy to see similar stars aligning by the Hippodrome Theatre. As the multiple Tony Award-winning musical “The Book of Mormon” had a well-received 13-day run downtown, the Italian wine bar and restaurant Forno quietly opened around the same time.
FEATURES
By Katy O'Donnell and Katy O'Donnell,Sun reporter | September 29, 2007
The Beatles may have sang that all you need is love, but when it comes to disobedient and dangerous mutts, Cesar Millan firmly yet calmly disagrees. "America loves dogs - like no other country in the world. They throw birthday parties for dogs," says Millan, who will present a dog-behavior seminar tomorrow afternoon at the Hippodrome Theatre. "Teaching America affection for a dog is not what I do. What I do teach is exercise, discipline and affection." If you go Cesar Millan will speak at 2 p.m. tomorrow at the Hippodrome Theatre, 12 N. Eutaw St. Call 410-837-7400 or go to france-merrickpac.
FEATURES
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 11, 2006
Her husband complains that loving her is "like loving the rock of Gibraltar." Her public thinks of her as "Mommile Golda who makes chicken soup for her soldiers." Both descriptions of Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir are given credence in William Gibson's Golda's Balcony. But the rock is the image most consistently conveyed by Valerie Harper in this one-woman show at the Hippodrome Theatre. Golda's Balcony Through May 21 at the Hippodrome Theatre, 12 N. Eutaw St. $24-$64. 410-547-SEAT
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN REPORTER | March 6, 2007
Taunting Frenchmen and a killer rabbit are at the gates of Baltimore. The touring company of Monty Python's Spamalot begins its 16-show run tonight at the Hippodrome Theatre. Spamalot, which opened on Broadway two years ago, is "lovingly ripped off" from the British comedy troupe's 1975 movie, Monty Python and the Holy Grail - with other brave and strong bits thrown in. Spamalot runs today through March 18, times vary, Hippodrome Theatre at the France-Merrick Performing Arts Center. Tickets, $30-$75, at BroadwayAcrossAmerica.
FEATURES
By MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY and MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY,SUN REPORTER | April 13, 2006
Early in the second act of Little Women, the heroine gets bad news. The audience begins to weep helplessly and doesn't stop for a solid half-hour. The Hippodrome Theatre begins to fill with sea-water. After 10 minutes, you could pilot a small boat down the aisles. After 20, you could drop a fishing line into the waves and catch a late dinner. Heck, even the fish are crying. Little Women 8 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays; 2 p.m. Saturdays; 1 p.m., 6:30 p.m. Sundays. Through April 23. Hippodrome Theatre, 12 N. Eutaw St. $26-$71.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,sun theater critic | August 31, 2006
Think of Mamma Mia! as a pop music puzzle. The puzzle pieces are 22 songs by the '70s Swedish pop group ABBA. The solution is a script that cleverly ties the songs together with a story about a bride-to-be's search for her father's identity. This solution has proved such a bona fide crowd-pleaser, the musical has become an international sensation. Its current engagement at the Hippodrome Theatre comes only two years after it first played here - with several of the same cast members (including former Baltimorean Tiffani Barbour as one of the bride's best friends)
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun theater critic | March 27, 2008
In the nearly half-century since Camelot was first performed, our national self-image has altered. We no longer are as confident as we were in 1960, that we always use might to serve right. Perhaps that explains some of my disappointment in the production of Lerner and Loewe's musical running at the Hippodrome Theatre. But there are other reasons for discontent. If you go Camelot runs at the Hippodrome Theatre, 12 N. Eutaw St., 8 p.m. Tuesdays-Fridays; 2 p.m., 8 p.m. Saturdays; and 1 p.m., 6:30 p.m. Sundays through April 6. $25-$70.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2014
Forno, a great-looking new restaurant and wine bar located across the street from the Hippodrome Theatre , opened as quietly as it could in late February just as the blockbuster musical "The Book of Mormon" pulled into town. Emina Dukic, who co-owns Forno with her husband, Bryan Noto, has said she wants Forno to be not only an amenity for the theater crowd but for residents of an emerging west-side neighborhood in and around the sprawling campus of the University of Maryland.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
Louis G. Hecht, an owner of the Triangle Sign Co. and an antiques appraiser who immersed himself in Baltimore's classic jazz scene, died of congestive heart failure Saturday, his 92nd birthday, at Levindale Hebrew Geriatric Center & Hospital. He lived in Pikesville. Born in Baltimore and raised on Bancroft Road, he was the son of Julien S. Hecht and Ruth Gerstley Hecht. His grandfather was Emanuel Hecht, one of the founding brothers of the Hecht Co. department store. A 1939 McDonogh School graduate, Mr. Hecht also attended the Hun School of Princeton in 1940.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2014
The Hippodrome Theatre at the France-Merrick Performing Arts Center, a key venue in the blossoming Bromo Tower Arts and Entertainment District, is getting a new president with a history of sparking the redevelopment of an arts community. Ron Legler, president of the Florida Theatrical Association in Orlando and a former chairman of the Downtown Arts District in that city, will succeed Jeff Daniel as Hippodrome president. He is scheduled to start in early May. "I'm very much a community person, as interested in community arts — music, dance, everything — as in Broadway tours," Legler, 46, said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2013
"Jersey Boys," the durable jukebox musical about the Four Seasons, has worked its way back to Baltimore, hanging on to what it's got - a whole bunch of popular songs interspersed with tales of triumph, tribulation and more triumph. For those who caught the show's visit to the Hippodrome Theatre only two years ago, there is a new cast to check out. For those who have managed to miss it (in addition to the national touring production, it has been on Broadway since 2005), this visit will make a worthy introduction.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2013
They were sprawled on their backs all over the floor, holding their stomachs and emitting a chorus of deep wails and moans. It could have been mistaken for a mass outbreak of food poisoning, but these kids were merely going through vocal exercises, learning the mechanics of proper breath intake and exhalation - part of the daily routine at Camp Hippodrome , held each summer at the historic Hippodrome Theatre. The camp, now in its sixth year, is one of several educational projects sponsored by the Hippodrome Foundation Inc. The foundation makes use of the Hippodrome during the offseason months with one-day programs for special-needs students, a half-day session for seniors and various other activities.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2013
There's something about "Les Miserables" that keeps me coming back. It's not that "Les Miz," running through Sunday at the Hippodrome Theatre , is my favorite musical. Far from it. It's all too easy to point out the technical flaws in Claude-Michel Schonberg's melodies (bombastic) and Herbert Kretzmer's lyrics (unsurprising). The critics have been making these arguments for the past 27 years, and for the past 27 years, audiences have been ignoring the critics. Producer Cameron Mackintosh's much-hyped new staging incorporates brighter costumes and screen projections to simulate such effects as Paris' underground sewers.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun theater critic | May 3, 2007
"What do you do when you're not sure?" If you're John Patrick Shanley, you write a play, call it Doubt, and begin with exactly that line. On stage, the line is spoken by a parish priest named Father Flynn at the beginning of a sermon. Ninety taut minutes later, at the end of Shanley's Pulitzer Prize-winning drama, currently at the Hippodrome Theatre, this affable priest's actions will be the subject of doubt -- and that's a good thing. It's what thought-provoking theater is all about. Doubt runs through May 13 at the Hippodrome Theatre, 12 N. Eutaw St. $27-$67.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | April 12, 2007
Molly Ringwald's Sweet Charity is definitely sweet. She's also cute and spunky and innocent. But though the actress -- still best known for the John Hughes' teen movies Sixteen Candles, The Breakfast Club and Pretty in Pink -- plays a dance hall hostess, she's not one of the slickest dancers in the touring production at the Hippodrome Theatre. Neil Simon's script does give Ringwald an out. "Who dances? We defend ourselves to music," one of Charity's co-workers explains to a newcomer. "Innocent" might also sound like a stretch for the taxi dancers at the sleazy Fandango Ballroom.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2012
When Anthony Bourdain brings his Guts & Glory tour to the Hippodrome on Saturday, it will be a return engagement for the notoriously opinionated "chef-at-large". Bourdain launched the Hippodrome 's annual Foodie Experience series in May 2010, when he shared the theater's stage with his friend, Eric Ripert. This time, Bourdain is working solo, but when we spoke with him in late September, he said that he's grown increasingly comfortable being on the stage. "I'm looking forward to it, "Bourdain said, "I've been doing [stage shows]
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2012
Spencer T. Kelly, a former hairstylist who owned and operated Spencer's Salon and was a combat veteran of World War II, died Aug. 8 from complications of dementia at the Pickersgill Retirement Community in Towson. He was 92. The son of farmers, Spencer Thomas Kelly was born and raised in Harmans. In his youth, he was a member of Uncle Jack's Kiddie Club and regularly performed at the Hippodrome Theatre. Mr. Kelly was a graduate of Southern High School and the Marinello School of Beauty in Baltimore.
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