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By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | January 14, 1998
Baltimore business leaders are asking the state for about $3.5 million over the next two years to begin the transformation of the Hippodrome theater, 12 N. Eutaw St., into a site suitable for large-scale Broadway productions.The project would shift one of the city's two venues for Broadway shows from the Morris A. Mechanic Theatre, the privately owned venture that opened in the late 1960s as a cornerstone of the Charles Center urban renewal effort, to the Hippodrome, a former vaudeville showplace located in a Baltimore neighborhood earmarked by the Schmoke administration for rejuvenation.
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NEWS
March 11, 2014
In reference to "Market malaise" (March 9), I fault the city government, the police department and all mayors past and present for the monstrosity that is World Famous Lexington Market. If reporter Scott Calvert can tell the public the story of the ugliness that prevails in and around this market, why haven't the powers that be taken charge? I used to ride the subway from Baltimore County to go to the Hippodrome Theater , but the last time I went was so devastating with the drug addicts and dealers, plus harassment of theater goers, I refuse to come back.
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NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2004
They have spent $62 million of public and private money to transform the Hippodrome Theater from a decrepit hulk on downtown Baltimore's west side into the region's sparkling showcase for Broadway shows. But a month before actors take the stage for opening night of The Producers, those guiding the theater's revival say the public does not seem to realize what a big change has taken place on North Eutaw Street. "I think it's still a well-kept secret in Baltimore," said Mark Sissman, president and chief executive of the Hippodrome Foundation Inc. "I was just with a bank manager, and she was shocked it was getting redone."
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2012
A man was stabbed and seriously injured Monday night in downtown Baltimore, according to city police. The attack occurred shortly before 9 p.m. in front of an M&T Bank branch near West Fayette and South Eutaw streets, said Det. Nicole Monroe, a city police spokeswoman. Details of the incident were not available. The victim was rushed to a nearby hospital, though police said the man's injuries did not appear to be life-threatening. The stabbing was near the Hippodrome Theater, which did not have any events scheduled Monday night, and close to several other attractions.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2012
A man was stabbed and seriously injured Monday night in downtown Baltimore, according to city police. The attack occurred shortly before 9 p.m. in front of an M&T Bank branch near West Fayette and South Eutaw streets, said Det. Nicole Monroe, a city police spokeswoman. Details of the incident were not available. The victim was rushed to a nearby hospital, though police said the man's injuries did not appear to be life-threatening. The stabbing was near the Hippodrome Theater, which did not have any events scheduled Monday night, and close to several other attractions.
NEWS
By Nora Achrati and Nora Achrati,SUN STAFF | April 19, 2002
A city Circuit Court jury has awarded a displaced property owner from Baltimore's west-side redevelopment zone about $90,000 more than what the city offered when he left his building a year ago. Baltimore Development Corp. offered Hippodrome Hatters owner Lou Boulmetis $127,000 for his four-story brick building at 15 N. Eutaw St. The buyout - a condemnation acquisition that falls under the city's eminent domain authority - is part of the city's $350 million plan to acquire and redevelop property near the Hippodrome Theater.
NEWS
March 1, 1991
Graveside services for Roland Broseker, who worked backstage at Baltimore area theaters for half a century, will take place at 10:45 a.m. today at the Maryland Veterans Cemetery in Crownsville.Mr. Broseker, 66, died unexpectedly Wednesday at his home on Seventh Street in Brooklyn. He had retired last summer as head flyman at the Morris Mechanic Theater, in charge of raising and lowering backdrops and other scenery.He had worked at the Mechanic since its opening in 1967, and earlier at the old Ford's Theater on Fayette Street.
BUSINESS
By Todd Beamon and Todd Beamon,Baltimoresun.com Staff | February 9, 2004
Former Maryland Gov. Parris N. Glendening said today that he will not be attending Tuesday night's gala opening of the Hippodrome Theater at the France-Merrick Performing Arts Center. "I wasn't invited," said Glendening, now president of the Smart Growth Leadership Institute in Washington. "I'm sure it was an oversight." The gala, which includes the opening night performance of the Mel Brooks musical The Producers, is being organized by the Hippodrome Foundation Inc., the quasi-public entity that manages the theater.
NEWS
October 3, 1998
IS IT A good idea to spend millions in taxpayers' money to turn Baltimore's old Hippodrome Theater into a 2,200-seat cultural center?Members of the House Appropriations Committee, touring the abandoned Eutaw Street vaudeville house recently, voiced reservations. They worry that the projected $35 million in renovation costs might go much higher. They also wonder whether the rundown neighborhood would scare away potential theater-goers.Their concerns are justified. Yet legislators ought to give free rein to their imagination and examine the Hippodrome project in a wider context.
NEWS
August 9, 2002
`Hippodrome' will remain on theater's facade In response to Patricia Montley's comments on the Hippodrome Theater ("Hippodrome's history belongs on marquee," Opinion Commentary, July 31) I'd note that from the outset of the redevelopment project, the Baltimore Center for the Performing Arts (BCPA) and its partners recognized the value and consequence of the Hippodrome name. Baltimore's citizens with fond memories of the theater, preservationists and public officials share this view. No one involved in the redevelopment ever planned to ignore the Hippodrome name.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | ed.gunts@baltsun.com | December 31, 2009
A commercial fixture on downtown Baltimore's west side is getting a makeover in 2010. The Lexaco Building at 501 W. Lexington St., longtime home of an appliance and furniture store, is being acquired by America's Realty, a rapidly growing, Pikesville-based shopping center developer. Carl Verstandig, president and chief executive officer of the company, said he has a contract to buy the three-story building for $650,000 and plans to spend $250,000 to $300,000 to restore its exterior and reconfigure its interior to create two retail spaces, including one for Lexaco.
FEATURES
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 9, 2006
Movin' Out moved into the Hippodrome Theatre this week, and while it's more of a dance/rock concert than a traditional musical, this Twyla Tharp-Billy Joel hybrid sends a jolt of electricity over the footlights. There's no spoken dialogue in Movin' Out, and the cast of 17 dancers don't sing. Instead, the vocals are provided by smooth-voiced, hardworking pianist Darren Holden (whose place is taken by Matthew Friedman at alternate performances). Three of the five principal characters are also played by alternating dancers, which is a good indication of the strenuousness of Tharp's choreography.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | August 8, 2004
Elisabeth Farwell is shedding some light on one of the major characters in Andrew Lloyd Webber's The Phantom of the Opera. Although the show is a musical, this character doesn't sing, dance or even speak. It is, however, a highly animate object - the famous chandelier, which rises over the audience in the first scene, then comes crashing down just before intermission. As the advance stage manager of Phantom, which begins performances at the Hippodrome Theatre Wednesday, Farwell oversees the arrival and installation of the show - with its gilded proscenium arch, hundreds of costumes, life-sized model elephant and mechanized boat.
BUSINESS
By Todd Beamon and Todd Beamon,Baltimoresun.com Staff | February 9, 2004
Former Maryland Gov. Parris N. Glendening said today that he will not be attending Tuesday night's gala opening of the Hippodrome Theater at the France-Merrick Performing Arts Center. "I wasn't invited," said Glendening, now president of the Smart Growth Leadership Institute in Washington. "I'm sure it was an oversight." The gala, which includes the opening night performance of the Mel Brooks musical The Producers, is being organized by the Hippodrome Foundation Inc., the quasi-public entity that manages the theater.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2004
They have spent $62 million of public and private money to transform the Hippodrome Theater from a decrepit hulk on downtown Baltimore's west side into the region's sparkling showcase for Broadway shows. But a month before actors take the stage for opening night of The Producers, those guiding the theater's revival say the public does not seem to realize what a big change has taken place on North Eutaw Street. "I think it's still a well-kept secret in Baltimore," said Mark Sissman, president and chief executive of the Hippodrome Foundation Inc. "I was just with a bank manager, and she was shocked it was getting redone."
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 27, 2003
There was the woman whose grandparents had their first date at the Hippodrome; the brother and sister whose uncle was master of stage properties; the man with fond memories of taking the streetcar to the Hippodrome on Saturdays with his grandfather, a butcher; and the woman whose great-great-uncle founded and built the theater. These were among the donors in the Adopt-A-Seat campaign who gathered at the Hippodrome Theater on Monday morning to affix plaques to the seats they "adopted" for donations ranging from $1,000 to $2,000 each.
NEWS
January 8, 2000
LIKE Willie Sutton, the glib hold-up man, Mayor Martin O'Malley has figured out that banks are where the money is. Thus, he has selected one of the nation's largest banks as the lead developer of a key downtown revitalization project, rejecting rival proposals from two smaller, local companies. As long as Kurt L. Schmoke was mayor, one of the smaller partnerships seemed to have a good chance to get the rights to build on a Eutaw Street parcel across from the soon-to-be-renovated Hippodrome Theater.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | October 5, 2001
A former Baltimore deputy housing commissioner will help guide the $56 million restoration of the Hippodrome Theater on downtown's west side. "My job is to think and live and breathe this project so it gets done," Mark Sissman, 56, said yesterday. Sissman is expected to be named today as president and chief executive officer of Baltimore Center for the Performing Arts Inc., a nonprofit group coordinating the public-private effort with the Maryland Stadium Authority, the construction manager.
NEWS
By From staff reports | February 25, 2003
In Baltimore City O'Malley to hold first forum for public since snowstorm In the wake of the Great Snow of 2003, and the rain and melt that took a toll on city streets and services, Mayor Martin O'Malley will ask city residents to tell him tonight, "How are we doing so far?" O'Malley will hold an "open dialogue" from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Edmondson-Westside High School, 501 Athol Ave. The forum, which the mayor holds once a month, encourages residents to express their opinions on city government's performance.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | October 31, 2002
STANDING BEFORE an enormous stage in the dank wreckage of the old Hippodrome Theater, Mark Sissman raises his arms as though signaling some ghostly orchestra that it's time to strike up the music again. It's been a long, long time between gigs. But Sissman, wearing a construction worker's hat and a look of Tchaikovskian confidence, is conducting something bigger than a symphonic overture. In the dusty chill of this old Eutaw Street movie house, the city of Baltimore attempts to reinvigorate the west side of its downtown.
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