Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHippodrome
IN THE NEWS

Hippodrome

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2014
Forno Restaurant & Wine Bar has opened on North Eutaw Street, right across the street from the Hippodrome and around the corner from the Everyman Theatre. "Our concept is focused on local, sustainable and seasonable food items,” said Emina Dukic, who co-owns Forno with her husband, Bryan Noto.  Forno is having its grand opening on March 15, but the 130-seat restaurant opened for business, as quietly as it could, in late February.  "We didn't want to announce ourselves to the world," Dukic said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
1. In the episode "Lucy Has Her Eyes Examined?" (it will be re-created in the "I Love Lucy Live on Stage" production at the Hippodrome ), Lucy gets a dance lesson from: a)Van Johnson b)William Parker c)The Crazy Dancin' Bear d)"King Cat" Walsh 2. When Lucy tests Ricky's fidelity in "The Black Wig" episode, she and Ethel disguise themselves for a date with the guys at an Italian restaurant. How does Lucy describe the outfit hastily supplied by costumer "Mother Carol" for Ethel: a)
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2014
The 2014-2015 lineup presented by Broadway Across America at the Hippodrome does not boast blockbusters on the order of this season's "The Book of Mormon. " But it will offer several recent Tony Award winners, a couple of dirty dancers and a famous foursome: Lucy, Ricky, Ethel and Fred (or approximations thereof). "It's hard to beat a season with 'Mormon' and 'War Horse,' " said Jeff Daniel, president of the Hippodrome at the France-Merrick Performing Arts Center. "But I think we've got a strong season with all sorts of things in it. To say there's something for everyone is an understatement.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
Sixty-three years ago this week - at 9 p.m. Oct. 15, 1951 - TV viewers got their first look at a situation comedy on CBS that, in short order, would become part of the country's cultural DNA. The focal point of the show was the redheaded title character, Lucy Ricardo (even in black and white, you could somehow tell the color of her hair); her Cuban-born husband, Ricky, leader of a dance band at a New York club; and their best friends, Fred and Ethel Mertz, landlords of the brownstone apartment building on the Upper East Side where they all laughed, loved, fought and schemed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
Early in "War Horse," the much-celebrated play now at the Hippodrome, a British farm boy named Albert tries to befriend Joey, a foal that his father bought with money intended for a mortgage payment. The anxious animal keeps his distance, but Albert is determined to breach the divide. After several attempts, the boy holds some feed behind his back, and the wary Joey slowly approaches. The whole scene produces a rare kind of theatrical magic, enough to make you quickly forget that the foal is a puppet operated by three humans, two inside and one out. If that moment, with all its charm and innocence, doesn't get to you, doesn't tug at whatever heartstrings you have, you may be in for a very uncomfortable ride.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2012
She emerged from the womb "like a froggy, ferny cabbage. " Some folks never did get over the shock of seeing the artichoke-colored baby, who grew up to be a fearsome threat to a girl from Kansas ... and her little dog, too. That green-skinned character known for generations only as the Wicked Witch of the West, thanks to the indelible 1939 film "The Wizard of Oz," turns out to have a name - Elphaba - and an eventful back story. How this witch ended up so witch-y is the subject of the multiple Tony Award-winning musical "Wicked," which "takes one of the iconic villains of our culture and turns it on its ear," said Marc Platt, the show's Pikesville-born producer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2012
Andrew Zimmern's "Bizarre Foods" picked up a James Beard award for TV Show, On Location at Friday night's Book, Broadcast and Awards. Zimmern, the headliner for this Saturday's Foodie Experience event at the Hippodrome, won an individual James Beard award in 2010 for TV Food Personality . The award for TV Show, Fixed Location went to "Chopped," and its host, Ted Allen, won this year's award for Media Personality/Host....
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2014
"The Book of Mormon" may not be to everyone's taste (I've had pretty spirited correspondence from some folks who took offense), but the mega-musical had no trouble drawing crowds on its first visit to Baltimore. The result turned out to be historic. "Mormon," which features a story and lyrics by Robert Lopez and "South Park" creators Matt Stone and Trey Parker, just broke the house record at the Hippodrome, grossing $1,675,748.25 for the week ending March 9. Breaking house records is something of a religion for this show.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2010
From the opening electronic tickertape messages, relaying birthday greetings and instructions on audience behavior, to the deliriously multisensory finale, the Blue Man Group show at the Hippodrome Theatre packs a wallop. It's a big, loud, funny, silly, visually arresting production. There's no point in trying to classify what these performers, with their trademark blue faces and bald, earless heads, do onstage for the better part of 90 minutes. It's much easier to go with the flow — and duck down in your seat when those guys start roaming the aisles.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley | November 18, 2004
Baltimore will get a welcome addition to this year's slate of holiday celebrations with the world premiere of a new Nutcracker at the Hippodrome. This Nutcracker, which will draw on American history, was choreographed by Septime Webre, artistic director of the Washington Ballet. It will be at the Hippodrome for seven performances Dec. 2-5. Webre's version will be set in a Washington mansion in 1882. In Clara's dream, the Nutcracker will resemble George Washington, and the Rat King may call to mind England's King George III. The great battle between the rats and the toys, of course, will feature Redcoats and the ragtag Continental Army.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
In an age when no cinematic product seems safe from being targeted for a theatrical make-over, and when so few of these movies-turned-musicals end up having much substance to offer, "Once" impresses all the more. This modest-scaled work, now getting its Baltimore debut at the Hippodrome, manages to preserve the essence of the hit indie film from 2007 written and directed by John Carney, while creating some unusual and genuine magic of its own. The screen version of "Once" introduced two engaging characters identified, in Everyman fashion, as Guy, a frustrated street musician in Dublin; and Girl, a Czech immigrant who happens upon him and finds herself riveted by his songs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
Big-bucks movies -- "Sister Act," "Ghost," "Flashdance," "Dirty Dancing," to name a few -- get turned into stage musicals with some frequency. Indie films form a smaller screen-to-boards subset. Of these, "Once," based on the minuscule-budget, shot-in-17-days Irish film written and directed by John Carney, may be the most distinctive. With its eight Tony Awards in 2012, including best music, "Once" continues to win fans and strong reviews on the road. The national touring production, which arrives Tuesday to open the Hippodrome Theatre 's Broadway Across America season, launched a year ago and will keep traveling at least through next summer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
The revived Broadway musical "Pippin" will head out on a national tour in September with a cast that includes Sasha Allen, a finalist on NBC's "The Voice," in the role of Leading Player. Adding a cool bit of history to the production will be Tony Award-winning actor John Rubinstein as Charles. Rubinstein created the title role of the musical on Broadway in 1972. That role will be played on tour by Kyle Selig, a veteran of the "Book of Mormon" tour. The tour launches in Denver and will reach Baltimore's Hippodrome in June 2015.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2014
The timing couldn't be better. Just as "Sister Act," the musical based on the hit movie from 1992, rolled into Baltimore with habits flying and vocal cords pumping, Sister Cristina Scuccia was getting ready to win the "The Voice of Italy" TV competition with a wail through "What a Feeling" from "Flashdance. " Could singing nuns get any cuter? I confess that Sister Cristina's pushy styling leaves me cold, and I confess I expected "Sister Act" to leave me even colder. Well, shut my missal.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2014
Singing nuns have always proved irresistible. There was the Belgian sensation who made "Dominique" a chart-topper in the 1960s, Today, there's Sister Cristina Scuccia, the Sicilian star of Italian TV and YouTube who belts out Alicia Keys songs, and the sweet-voiced, Missouri-based Benedictines of Mary, Queen of Apostles, whose CDs of Gregorian chant are best-sellers. And coming to Baltimore this week are some very vocal nuns who get into the habit of shaking up church services at Queen of Angels Cathedral in Philadelphia with the help of high-voltage songs.
NEWS
By Thomas Maronick Jr | May 29, 2014
Baltimore theater fans are hard-pressed as of late to find a reason to leave the city with so much available right at home: superb local theater companies and community theaters and the renovated Hippodrome . It's a welcome revival of an industry the city was once known for. In its heyday in the 1930s, Baltimore was a theater and music town where the legendary Frank Sinatra, Billie Holiday and countless other stars got their start or visited on...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2010
Folks impervious to the charms of vintage theater and film, immune to the allure of farce, or allergic to dry British wit and jolts of Monty Python-esque zaniness may find the fuss about "The 39 Steps" a puzzlement. Everyone else is apt to be swept along by the abundant humor and style of this ingenious show, which has settled into the Hippodrome for the last stop on a nearly year-long national tour. Taking as it starting point Alfred Hitchcock's clever 1935 film of the same name, "The 39 Steps," adapted by Patrick Barlow, adds up to more than homage.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2013
There should always be room for an old-fashioned burst of holiday entertainment, free of complicated thoughts or challenging philosophy, well stocked with song and dance. "Irving Berlin's White Christmas," now at the Hippodrome, fits the bill nicely. To be sure, it does place a few demands on audiences. For a start, you have to suspend all cynicism and stifle the urge to groan at obvious jokes and turns of plot. Not that there is much of a plot. And you have to be open to some second- or third-drawer Berlin ditties along the way. Once you accept those terms -- if I can do it, you can do it -- you might be surprised how remarkably easy it is to enjoy this snowflake-thin variation on the let's-put-on-a-show business that goes with vintage musical comedy territory.
ENTERTAINMENT
Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2014
As in any major city, Baltimore and its bars benefit from a hot ticket. Whether it is the Orioles' opening day or a Justin Timberlake and Jay Z concert downtown, these events rarely fail to draw large crowds. In the process, many attendees find time to patronize bars in the neighborhoods they visit. In late February, it was easy to see similar stars aligning by the Hippodrome Theatre. As the multiple Tony Award-winning musical “The Book of Mormon” had a well-received 13-day run downtown, the Italian wine bar and restaurant Forno quietly opened around the same time.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2014
Early on in "Peter and the Starcatcher," the ingenious and brilliantly performed play now at the Hippodrome, there's a flashback to a grim orphanage in England where the boy who will become Peter Pan by the end of the show endures brutal treatment. As the ugly business is reenacted, a voice softly emerges amid the din from a corner of the stage, singing the opening lines of a work from the mid-19th century by Felix Mendelssohn, a work that Victorians loved: "O for the wings, for the wings of a dove, far away, far away would I rove.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.