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Hippocratic Oath

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By Anthony Flint and Anthony Flint,Boston Globe | August 14, 1991
BOSTON -- The Hippocratic oath, uttered for decades by new doctors at medical school graduation rites, is nearing extinction because it is outdated and at odds with some modern medical practices.The oath, attributed to the Greek physician Hippocrates about the fourth century B.C., is being shunned in favor of alternative oaths nationwide.There is no quibble with the oath's pledge to do no harm and maintain patient confidentiality. But objections have grown over the years to the oath's paternalistic tone and to its outdated references to the apprentice system of training doctors.
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NEWS
March 16, 2014
If neurosurgeon Ben Carson practiced medicine the way he practices politics, the "M.D. " after his name would stand for "Malpractice Defendant. " Every physician takes the Hippocratic Oath to "do no harm. " To oppose universal health care for Americans - as embodied in the Affordable Care Act - is on its face a violation of that oath. It constitutes, in short, "values malpractice" - a charge that applies not only to him but also to Congressional ACA opponents such as Dr. Rand Paul and Dr. Andy Harris.
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NEWS
May 13, 2013
The health care industry - doctors, hospitals, medical facilities and pharmaceuticals - will do this country in and only the rich will survive ("Costs vary for same treatment," May 9). It does not make sense for hospitals to charge varying and outrageous prices for the same procedures. No wonder Medicare is in trouble. When doctors take the Hippocratic Oath, they vow to do no harm, but these outrageous prices seem like a defeat for the oath. lola J. Massey, Owings Mills
NEWS
May 13, 2013
The health care industry - doctors, hospitals, medical facilities and pharmaceuticals - will do this country in and only the rich will survive ("Costs vary for same treatment," May 9). It does not make sense for hospitals to charge varying and outrageous prices for the same procedures. No wonder Medicare is in trouble. When doctors take the Hippocratic Oath, they vow to do no harm, but these outrageous prices seem like a defeat for the oath. lola J. Massey, Owings Mills
NEWS
August 9, 2003
Robert J. Donovan, 90, a veteran Washington newsman and best-selling author of PT-109: John F. Kennedy in World War II, died yesterday in St. Petersburg, Fla. Mr. Donovan had been on life support since suffering a stroke last week. He played a key role in shaping the Los Angeles Times' Washington bureau after then-publisher Otis Chandler pulled him in 1963 from The New York Herald Tribune, the paper that sent him to Washington in 1947. Among Mr. Donovan's 13 books was PT-109, an account of President Kennedy's war experiences, published in 1961.
NEWS
March 16, 2014
If neurosurgeon Ben Carson practiced medicine the way he practices politics, the "M.D. " after his name would stand for "Malpractice Defendant. " Every physician takes the Hippocratic Oath to "do no harm. " To oppose universal health care for Americans - as embodied in the Affordable Care Act - is on its face a violation of that oath. It constitutes, in short, "values malpractice" - a charge that applies not only to him but also to Congressional ACA opponents such as Dr. Rand Paul and Dr. Andy Harris.
NEWS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | May 17, 2004
In ceremonies across the country this week, robed medical school graduates will rise, degrees in hand, and perform their first act as physicians and their last as students. They will swear an oath with ties to ancient times, one generally credited to Hippocrates. The ritual is an eerie chant of principles that Dr. William Henrich, the University of Maryland's chairman of internal medicine, describes as a resonating link with all physicians: those long since gone, the robed young doctors standing shoulder to shoulder in the ceremonies of the present, the healers yet to come.
FEATURES
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight-Ridder News Service | August 31, 1997
I turned 50, which is really not so old. A lot of very famous people accomplished great things after 50. For example, it was during the post-50 phase of his life that the brilliant physicist Albert Einstein produced the vast majority of his drool.But still, when you're 50, you're definitely "getting up there," so I decided I'd better go in for my annual physical examination, which is something I do approximately every seven to nine years. keep my physicals spaced out because my doctor, Curt, who is ordinarily a terrific guy, has a tendency to put on a scary rubber glove and make sudden lunges at my personal region.
TOPIC
By KAREN BRANDON | August 29, 1999
SINCE ANCIENT TIMES, the Hippocratic oath and its prescription to doctors to "do no harm" has served as a sort of ethical compass for physicians. Scientists have no such equivalent, though their work increasingly takes them into matters with moral, ethical, humanitarian and social implications.The idea of an oath for scientists, though hardly on the brink of becoming an international standard, has become the subject of a small campaign that signals a broader debate over the extent of scientists' obligations to society, and unease about how to contend with the unprecedented ethical issues emerging from science's extraordinary achievements.
NEWS
May 6, 2009
Cap and trade would wreck economy In the Sunday editorial "The climate clash," it was stated that: 1. The threat is real 2. Time is of the essence and 3. We can do something about it. In response to this "dire" situation, I would say this: Global climate change is not a problem caused by man but a natural cycle we have absolutely no control over. This is evidenced by the fact in history that many times have been cooler or warmer than now, and the world survived every time without ruining industry or giving up the necessities of life.
NEWS
May 6, 2009
Cap and trade would wreck economy In the Sunday editorial "The climate clash," it was stated that: 1. The threat is real 2. Time is of the essence and 3. We can do something about it. In response to this "dire" situation, I would say this: Global climate change is not a problem caused by man but a natural cycle we have absolutely no control over. This is evidenced by the fact in history that many times have been cooler or warmer than now, and the world survived every time without ruining industry or giving up the necessities of life.
NEWS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | May 17, 2004
In ceremonies across the country this week, robed medical school graduates will rise, degrees in hand, and perform their first act as physicians and their last as students. They will swear an oath with ties to ancient times, one generally credited to Hippocrates. The ritual is an eerie chant of principles that Dr. William Henrich, the University of Maryland's chairman of internal medicine, describes as a resonating link with all physicians: those long since gone, the robed young doctors standing shoulder to shoulder in the ceremonies of the present, the healers yet to come.
NEWS
August 9, 2003
Robert J. Donovan, 90, a veteran Washington newsman and best-selling author of PT-109: John F. Kennedy in World War II, died yesterday in St. Petersburg, Fla. Mr. Donovan had been on life support since suffering a stroke last week. He played a key role in shaping the Los Angeles Times' Washington bureau after then-publisher Otis Chandler pulled him in 1963 from The New York Herald Tribune, the paper that sent him to Washington in 1947. Among Mr. Donovan's 13 books was PT-109, an account of President Kennedy's war experiences, published in 1961.
TOPIC
By KAREN BRANDON | August 29, 1999
SINCE ANCIENT TIMES, the Hippocratic oath and its prescription to doctors to "do no harm" has served as a sort of ethical compass for physicians. Scientists have no such equivalent, though their work increasingly takes them into matters with moral, ethical, humanitarian and social implications.The idea of an oath for scientists, though hardly on the brink of becoming an international standard, has become the subject of a small campaign that signals a broader debate over the extent of scientists' obligations to society, and unease about how to contend with the unprecedented ethical issues emerging from science's extraordinary achievements.
FEATURES
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight-Ridder News Service | August 31, 1997
I turned 50, which is really not so old. A lot of very famous people accomplished great things after 50. For example, it was during the post-50 phase of his life that the brilliant physicist Albert Einstein produced the vast majority of his drool.But still, when you're 50, you're definitely "getting up there," so I decided I'd better go in for my annual physical examination, which is something I do approximately every seven to nine years. keep my physicals spaced out because my doctor, Curt, who is ordinarily a terrific guy, has a tendency to put on a scary rubber glove and make sudden lunges at my personal region.
NEWS
By Anthony Flint and Anthony Flint,Boston Globe | August 14, 1991
BOSTON -- The Hippocratic oath, uttered for decades by new doctors at medical school graduation rites, is nearing extinction because it is outdated and at odds with some modern medical practices.The oath, attributed to the Greek physician Hippocrates about the fourth century B.C., is being shunned in favor of alternative oaths nationwide.There is no quibble with the oath's pledge to do no harm and maintain patient confidentiality. But objections have grown over the years to the oath's paternalistic tone and to its outdated references to the apprentice system of training doctors.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | May 20, 2001
The keynote speaker has finished. The medical students have received their degrees. Then, at most medical schools in the United States, comes the climactic act of the graduation ceremony. In a moment many aspiring physicians have imagined for years, the class rises together to recite an oath. The newly minted physicians, reciting one of the many versions of the Hippocratic Oath, pledge to do their best to take care of their patients and are reminded that they are embarking upon an enterprise unlike any other.
NEWS
By Kay Withers and Kay Withers,Special to The Sun | September 21, 1990
WARSAW, Poland -- A commission dominated by hard-line Catholic senators approved a draft bill this week to ban abortion under any circumstances and to punish with up to two years in jail any woman who receives an abortion and any doctor who terminates a pregnancy.At the same time, a revised Hippocratic oath accepted by Poland's Main Medical Board obliged new doctors to serve human life and health"from the moment of conception."Following the introduction of the Roman Catholic catechism in state schools, these latest moves provide further evidence of increasing clericalism in Polish public life under the country's new, church-supported, Solidarity-led government.
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