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By Dr. Simeon Margolis | January 22, 1991
Q: My doctor has recommended a total hip replacement. I would like to know more about that procedure. How long will it take me to get back on my feet and what is the long-range outcome?A: The hip joint is made up of a cup-shaped cavity (acetabulum) in the hipbone into which fits the head of the thighbone (femur). During total hip replacement surgery, the head of the femur is removed. The acetabulum is enlarged and a layer of special plastic is inserted. A metal sphere attached to a stem is inserted into the remaining part of the femur as a replacement for the discarded femoral head.
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BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,jay.hancock@baltsun.com | May 2, 2009
The Medicare health program for seniors jeopardizes the country's fiscal health a lot more than the fiscal stimulus or Wall Street bailouts. At Medicare's present rate of expansion, according to the Government Accountability Office, Americans living in 2080 will have to pay 10 percent of their incomes just to cover cancer surgery, heart operations and other care for old people, many of whom will die a few months after treatment. How can we avoid the worst? President Barack Obama has made the first move by starting a tough conversation about the high costs and questionable benefits of care at the end of life.
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By Chicago Tribune | March 13, 1992
CHICAGO -- Chicago Bears coach Mike Ditka underwent total replacement surgery on his left hip yesterday in Rush-Presbyterian St. Luke's Hospital eight years after undergoing a similar procedure for his right hip.Dr. Mitchell Sheinkop performed the hour-and-20-minute operation. Sheinkop performed the original operation on the Bears' coach in 1984."It went very nicely," Sheinkop said. "The surgery was uneventful and uncomplicated. He was speaking with his wife afterward and wide awake."The doctor said Ditka's condition was caused by arthritis not uncommon in football players.
NEWS
By Will Beall | January 2, 2008
Some hipster's English mastiff, big enough to bring down a cape buffalo, lies athwart the front entrance to Starbucks while his "daddy" is inside hunched over an iBook. So my 4-year-old son and I head for the side door. A spastic Weimaraner tied to a bistro set lunges at us, gets tangled up in the iron furniture and yowls like he's caught in a bear trap. My kid covers his ears. The Weimaraner's "mommy" charges out with her yoga mat slung like a quiver, nonfat soy latte in her hand, and tries to untangle the mess one-handed.
NEWS
By Hilary Waldman and By Hilary Waldman,Special to the Sun | June 30, 2002
At a time when big operations have become about as archaic as the dial telephone and the manual typewriter, hip replacement surgery has remained one of the last vestiges of medicine requiring a long incision, a long hospital stay and a long recuperation. But that, too, is changing. Doctors across the country have started replacing worn-out hip sockets through incisions less than 4 inches long, down from the standard 10- to 18-inch slice that patients endured just a few years ago. Although there is scant solid scientific evidence yet, proponents think the new approach is easier on patients, causing less pain, less blood loss and a much quicker recovery.
FEATURES
By Kevin Eck and Kevin Eck,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2005
Every time Hulk Hogan tries to get out, wrestling fans pull him back in. As the iconic professional wrestler was inducted into the World Wrestling Entertainment Hall of Fame four weeks ago, the crowd at the Universal Amphitheatre in Los Angeles erupted into a chant of "One more match!" during an impassioned, 20-minute standing ovation. Always the crowd pleaser, Hogan answered the fans' call and will return to the ring Sunday in Manchester, N.H., at WWE's "Backlash" pay-per-view show. Hogan, 51, will team with WWE fan favorite Shawn Michaels in a tag-team match against anti-American villains Muhammad Hassan and Daivari.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | October 24, 2005
It has now been six weeks since they wheeled me into the operating room at St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson and a terrific orthopedist named David Dalury cut into my hip and replaced the old, diseased joint with a shiny steel one good for up to 100,000 miles, with a full bumper-to-bumper warranty. OK, if you're a regular reader, I know what you're thinking. You're thinking: Oh, God, not another hip-replacement column. Give it a rest, will you? What, you're the only person who ever had this surgery?
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | October 3, 2005
At some point in the last three weeks, you may have picked up the local rag and turned to this section and thought: "Hmmm, where's what's-his-name? The fat guy with the crazy hair?" OK, fine, here's the story. As required by law of every citizen who reaches a certain age and has been at all active during his lifetime, I recently underwent hip-replacement surgery. And this strikes me as a good time to clear up a few myths about the operation. First of all, everyone tells you that a hip replacement is a piece of cake, and that they do so many now that it's become just another procedure, no big deal, like having a wart removed or something.
NEWS
By Will Beall | January 2, 2008
Some hipster's English mastiff, big enough to bring down a cape buffalo, lies athwart the front entrance to Starbucks while his "daddy" is inside hunched over an iBook. So my 4-year-old son and I head for the side door. A spastic Weimaraner tied to a bistro set lunges at us, gets tangled up in the iron furniture and yowls like he's caught in a bear trap. My kid covers his ears. The Weimaraner's "mommy" charges out with her yoga mat slung like a quiver, nonfat soy latte in her hand, and tries to untangle the mess one-handed.
NEWS
By Muphen Whitney and Muphen Whitney,Contributing writer | October 16, 1991
Someday an encyclopedia may be written on the life of Glenelg resident Mary Jacobs.The entry could read, "Mary Morse Jacobs: horsewoman, fox-hunter, Pony Club leader, painter, portrait artist, sculptor,wife and mother."One of the most important things in Mary Jacobs' life today, however, is getting out the word on the benefits of a hip replacement to people with hip problems who wish to remain active."I remember how worried and scared of the operation I was before I had it," Jacobs,who is in her late 50s, says, although it's hard to imagine her being afraid of anything.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Reporter | July 26, 2007
For some people, simply jogging or playing a friendly game of tennis comes with reminders of the passage of time: creaking knees and aching hips. Although these symptoms often can be treated with rest, therapy and medication, nearly 500,000 Americans each year receive knee replacements, says Dr. Brian Mulliken, a joint replacement specialist at St. Joseph Medical Center/Orthopaedic Associates. Another 300,000 people receive hip replacements. And, as the population ages, that number grows annually.
NEWS
By Emily Haile and Emily Haile,Capital News Service | November 26, 2006
Washington -- It started with a face-lift, in Malaysia. That was four years ago, when Kathy Bogardus, 63, called her well-traveled, international businessman son at home in Odenton. Bogardus had a hunch that the $16,000 to $20,000 price tag she had been quoted for cosmetic surgery could be reduced if she had it done overseas. That hunch paid off for both her and her son Judson Anglin, 36. He investigated prices and surgeries in Malaysia and Thailand, where his wife, Patty, is from. Eventually, Bogardus had the surgery in Malaysia for $5,000.
NEWS
By MICHAEL STROH and MICHAEL STROH,SUN REPORTER | July 31, 2006
Before reports surfaced last week that he flunked a drug test, the biggest medical concern facing Tour de France champion Floyd Landis was joint replacement surgery for his much-publicized bum hip. And in that problem, at least, the cyclist has plenty of company. Fueled in part by fitness-crazed baby boomers and aging jocks who refuse to be sidelined by throbbing knees and other worn-out parts, experts expect a boom in joint replacement surgeries in the coming years. By 2030, the number of knee replacements in the United States is expected to jump 673 percent to 3.48 million, according to a study presented at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons' annual meeting in March.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | October 24, 2005
It has now been six weeks since they wheeled me into the operating room at St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson and a terrific orthopedist named David Dalury cut into my hip and replaced the old, diseased joint with a shiny steel one good for up to 100,000 miles, with a full bumper-to-bumper warranty. OK, if you're a regular reader, I know what you're thinking. You're thinking: Oh, God, not another hip-replacement column. Give it a rest, will you? What, you're the only person who ever had this surgery?
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | October 3, 2005
At some point in the last three weeks, you may have picked up the local rag and turned to this section and thought: "Hmmm, where's what's-his-name? The fat guy with the crazy hair?" OK, fine, here's the story. As required by law of every citizen who reaches a certain age and has been at all active during his lifetime, I recently underwent hip-replacement surgery. And this strikes me as a good time to clear up a few myths about the operation. First of all, everyone tells you that a hip replacement is a piece of cake, and that they do so many now that it's become just another procedure, no big deal, like having a wart removed or something.
FEATURES
By Kevin Eck and Kevin Eck,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2005
Every time Hulk Hogan tries to get out, wrestling fans pull him back in. As the iconic professional wrestler was inducted into the World Wrestling Entertainment Hall of Fame four weeks ago, the crowd at the Universal Amphitheatre in Los Angeles erupted into a chant of "One more match!" during an impassioned, 20-minute standing ovation. Always the crowd pleaser, Hogan answered the fans' call and will return to the ring Sunday in Manchester, N.H., at WWE's "Backlash" pay-per-view show. Hogan, 51, will team with WWE fan favorite Shawn Michaels in a tag-team match against anti-American villains Muhammad Hassan and Daivari.
NEWS
By Patricia Anstett and Patricia Anstett,Knight Ridder/Tribune | December 5, 1999
Robert Brendel had to face the inevitable: He needed surgery. The pain in his hip was so great it awakened him every night.Brendel had put off a hip replacement operation for months because he knew what a big deal it was. His older brother had the surgery five years earlier, and it took him almost six months to resume a normal life, longer than usual.But in the past five years, a second generation of hip implants has arrived that promises longer wear -- as much as several decades, possibly even a lifetime -- for the estimated 250,000 Americans who undergo hip replacement procedures each year.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,jay.hancock@baltsun.com | May 2, 2009
The Medicare health program for seniors jeopardizes the country's fiscal health a lot more than the fiscal stimulus or Wall Street bailouts. At Medicare's present rate of expansion, according to the Government Accountability Office, Americans living in 2080 will have to pay 10 percent of their incomes just to cover cancer surgery, heart operations and other care for old people, many of whom will die a few months after treatment. How can we avoid the worst? President Barack Obama has made the first move by starting a tough conversation about the high costs and questionable benefits of care at the end of life.
NEWS
By Nancy Menefee Jackson and Nancy Menefee Jackson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 14, 2004
When John Sheehan runs down the field, officiating a men's lacrosse game, he knows he is wearing out his hips. That would be the two artificial hips - needed as a result of Lyme disease - that allowed Sheehan to return to the sport he has loved since high school. His right hip was replaced in June 2002, the left in November 2002, just after he turned 47. Despite what many might consider a disability, Sheehan, a Howard County fire department captain who lives in Ellicott City, expects to officiate about 70 games this spring, meaning virtually every day from mid-March to mid-May.
NEWS
By Hilary Waldman and By Hilary Waldman,Special to the Sun | June 30, 2002
At a time when big operations have become about as archaic as the dial telephone and the manual typewriter, hip replacement surgery has remained one of the last vestiges of medicine requiring a long incision, a long hospital stay and a long recuperation. But that, too, is changing. Doctors across the country have started replacing worn-out hip sockets through incisions less than 4 inches long, down from the standard 10- to 18-inch slice that patients endured just a few years ago. Although there is scant solid scientific evidence yet, proponents think the new approach is easier on patients, causing less pain, less blood loss and a much quicker recovery.
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