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By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2011
Among the first things that hip-hop performer Damon Holley showed the assembled students at Ellicott Mills Middle School was that, as in schoolwork, learning about hip-hop requires undivided attention. Hip-hop artists simply go about getting that attention differently. "Every time you hear me say, 'What's the name of the game?' I want you all to say, 'Pay attention!' And then I want you to remain completely quiet," said Holley of Illstyle and Peace Productions, a Philadelphia-based dance company that staged a high-energy performance, "The History of Hip-Hop," at Ellicott Mills on Thursday.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2011
Among the first things that hip-hop performer Damon Holley showed the assembled students at Ellicott Mills Middle School was that, as in schoolwork, learning about hip-hop requires undivided attention. Hip-hop artists simply go about getting that attention differently. "Every time you hear me say, 'What's the name of the game?' I want you all to say, 'Pay attention!' And then I want you to remain completely quiet," said Holley of Illstyle and Peace Productions, a Philadelphia-based dance company that staged a high-energy performance, "The History of Hip-Hop," at Ellicott Mills on Thursday.
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NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,Sun reporter | February 13, 2008
To punctuate her point during a high school debate competition that gangsta rap has no place in society, Denaya Barnes ended her oral argument with - what else - a rap: I propose that hip-hop has the struggle And you fake MCs need to be muzzled Thanks to your representation Hip-hop needs an emancipation The lyrics were part of a longer rap that Barnes, a 17-year-old City College student, unleashed on her opponents - two other city public high school...
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,Sun reporter | February 13, 2008
To punctuate her point during a high school debate competition that gangsta rap has no place in society, Denaya Barnes ended her oral argument with - what else - a rap: I propose that hip-hop has the struggle And you fake MCs need to be muzzled Thanks to your representation Hip-hop needs an emancipation The lyrics were part of a longer rap that Barnes, a 17-year-old City College student, unleashed on her opponents - two other city public high school...
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | September 25, 2007
To spruce up its fall lineup and undoubtedly appease those who have long criticized the network's history of vapid programming, BET is airing Hip-Hop vs. America, a town-hall style meeting addressing the negative impact of hip-hop music. It's a three-part special starting tonight and ending tomorrow. Parts 1 and 2 air tonight and tomorrow, respectively, at 8 p.m. on BET; Part 3 airs tomorrow online at BET.com. Moderated by camera-friendly BET personalities Jeff Johnson and Toure, the series features different panels of cultural critics (Stanley Crouch, Nelson George, Michael Eric Dyson)
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,SUN STAFF | July 24, 2004
It has been hard to miss the always flashy hip-hop impresario P. Diddy, leading evening newscasts and cracking jokes with David Letterman. But the Broadway actor/mega producer/fashion mogul/Hamptons-to- Cannes jet-setter isn't plugging his latest entertainment venture. He's challenging young people to "Vote or Die." And he's pledging to make civic participation trendier than one of his supermodel-swarmed VIP parties. From glitz to grass roots, a revolution is blaring across the airwaves and pounding the streets trying to channel the rogue energy of the elusive "Hip-Hop Generation" into a political force demanding social change.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 4, 1999
The RootsThings Fall Apart (MCA 08811 1948)Because rap arose out of DJ culture, where the vocalists didn't sing and there were no traditional instruments in sight, it was seen by some musicians as being anti-musical.Rap crews didn't hit the stage with guitars, keyboards, bass and drums. Instead, they turned up with just microphones, a couple of turntables and a mixer -- hardly the sort of thing that could be considered band gear. Worse, instead of emphasizing melody and harmony, rappers worked on a mostly rhythmic level, relying on prerecorded, repetitious "loops" to fuel the verbal interplay.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 24, 1997
Eight years' worth of rap and hip-hop is showcased on BET tonight (and all week), part of the channel's celebration of Black Music Month."So I Married an Axe Murderer" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Mike Myers is a newlywed whose bride (Nancy Travis) may not be quite the sweetheart she seems. Fox."Frasier" (9 p.m.-9: 30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Thanksgiving is a time for family, even for the Cranes. In this repeat from November, Lilith ( Bebe Neuwirth, always a delight) summons Frasier back to Boston to help young Frederick secure a spot in a prestigious private school.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | October 24, 2003
They weren't sitting in classrooms learning algebra or history yesterday, but about 250 students from across the state got a valuable lesson on life when they spent time in Annapolis with members of the state's Legislative Black Caucus. In workshops that ranged from hip-hop music to civic responsibility, the predominantly African-American students were told that, despite society's often low expectations of them, they can succeed and avoid the pitfalls that drugs and violence bring. "I'm raising two black boys in America in 2003, in a culture that says by the time they're 21 they'll either be dead or in jail," Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele told dozens of children, many of whom moaned at the notion.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | October 24, 2003
They weren't sitting in classrooms learning algebra or history yesterday, but about 250 students from across the state got a valuable lesson on life when they spent time in Annapolis with members of the state's Legislative Black Caucus. In workshops that ranged from hip-hop music to civic responsibility, the predominantly African-American group of students was told that, despite society's often-low expectations, the students can succeed and avoid the pitfalls that drugs and violence bring.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | September 25, 2007
To spruce up its fall lineup and undoubtedly appease those who have long criticized the network's history of vapid programming, BET is airing Hip-Hop vs. America, a town-hall style meeting addressing the negative impact of hip-hop music. It's a three-part special starting tonight and ending tomorrow. Parts 1 and 2 air tonight and tomorrow, respectively, at 8 p.m. on BET; Part 3 airs tomorrow online at BET.com. Moderated by camera-friendly BET personalities Jeff Johnson and Toure, the series features different panels of cultural critics (Stanley Crouch, Nelson George, Michael Eric Dyson)
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | August 25, 2006
On one of its last great albums, 1998's Aquemini, OutKast declared in the title track: Nothing is for sure, nothing is for certain, nothing lasts forever/But until they close the curtain/It's him and I, Aquemini. At that point in their career, Big Boi and Andre 3000 were so tight, so in sync that they blended their zodiac signs (Aquarius and Gemini, respectively) for the album title. And the music then glowed with their eccentric, electric synthesis of rap, funk, trip-hop, '70s soul and techno.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | October 21, 2004
De La Soul isn't playing anymore. The three grown men are well into their 30s now with kids, bills and responsibilities. The rap group's "D.A.I.S.Y. age" - which stood for Da Inner Sound Y'all and was the era when the trio trumpeted peace and love in a somewhat goofy, left-of-center style - has passed. The new album, The Grind Date, a fluid, hard-hitting set, reflects the change clearly. Brilliantly. Back in the spring of '89 when De La Soul dropped its classic debut, 3 Feet High and Rising, the guys were "kids, playing around, innocent and joking," says Dave "Trugoy/Plug 2" Jolicoeur, one of the trio's lyric assassins and its chief brainstormer.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,SUN STAFF | July 24, 2004
It has been hard to miss the always flashy hip-hop impresario P. Diddy, leading evening newscasts and cracking jokes with David Letterman. But the Broadway actor/mega producer/fashion mogul/Hamptons-to- Cannes jet-setter isn't plugging his latest entertainment venture. He's challenging young people to "Vote or Die." And he's pledging to make civic participation trendier than one of his supermodel-swarmed VIP parties. From glitz to grass roots, a revolution is blaring across the airwaves and pounding the streets trying to channel the rogue energy of the elusive "Hip-Hop Generation" into a political force demanding social change.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2003
When hip-hop music magnate Kevin W. Liles played football at Woodlawn High School in the mid-1980s, there was little more to the field than the gridiron. Parents and fans crowded onto a small set of bleachers, brought their own chairs, or stood. But at yesterday's homecoming game against rival Milford Mill Academy, just about everyone had a seat - in a gleaming new 2,000-person stadium named in Liles' honor. After starting as an intern in the early 1990s, Liles rose to become president of Def Jam Records in 1998 and has been a major force in the music industry ever since.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | October 24, 2003
They weren't sitting in classrooms learning algebra or history yesterday, but about 250 students from across the state got a valuable lesson on life when they spent time in Annapolis with members of the state's Legislative Black Caucus. In workshops that ranged from hip-hop music to civic responsibility, the predominantly African-American group of students was told that, despite society's often-low expectations, the students can succeed and avoid the pitfalls that drugs and violence bring.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2003
When hip-hop music magnate Kevin W. Liles played football at Woodlawn High School in the mid-1980s, there was little more to the field than the gridiron. Parents and fans crowded onto a small set of bleachers, brought their own chairs, or stood. But at yesterday's homecoming game against rival Milford Mill Academy, just about everyone had a seat - in a gleaming new 2,000-person stadium named in Liles' honor. After starting as an intern in the early 1990s, Liles rose to become president of Def Jam Records in 1998 and has been a major force in the music industry ever since.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | December 18, 2001
Tough and streetwise, Vincent, Antonio and Charles have never met before. Yet, gathered around a boom box in a Baltimore classroom, they take turns improvising to a hip-hop beat. Their language is foul, their rhymes full of violent images. And Eleshiea Goode, a former high school teacher supervising them at Maryland New Directions, a nonprofit organization, couldn't be prouder. Hip-hop music, some of it known for its unprintable lyrics, denigration of women and exaltation of the power of guns, is trying on a new role -- turning around the lives of troubled young listeners.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | October 24, 2003
They weren't sitting in classrooms learning algebra or history yesterday, but about 250 students from across the state got a valuable lesson on life when they spent time in Annapolis with members of the state's Legislative Black Caucus. In workshops that ranged from hip-hop music to civic responsibility, the predominantly African-American students were told that, despite society's often low expectations of them, they can succeed and avoid the pitfalls that drugs and violence bring. "I'm raising two black boys in America in 2003, in a culture that says by the time they're 21 they'll either be dead or in jail," Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele told dozens of children, many of whom moaned at the notion.
FEATURES
By Greg Kot and Greg Kot,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 31, 2001
In the days before he became Kid Rock, little Bob Ritchie used to stand in front of a mirror pretending he was Michael Jackson in sequins and a white glove, working out his dance routine to "Beat It." "Everybody has their little corny stage, and that was mine," Rock says with a laugh. "Now I realize what really got me was that beat, and it was an 808 drum machine - the most prominent instrument in rap music during the '80s. It was on everything from the Beastie Boys' Licensed to Ill, the Run-D.
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