Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHip Hop
IN THE NEWS

Hip Hop

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case | July 11, 2011
THE GOOD: Similar to last year's lineup, there's a lot to like, especially if you take pride in keeping up with music just-outside the Top 40. TV on the Radio, Black Keys and a set from LCD Soundsystem head honcho James Murphy are the big names committed. Dance-enthusiasts Cut Copy and Empire of the Sun will sound particularly fitting in the sexual heat (Sept. 10, Merriweather Post Pavilion). Prepare to sweat it all out. Also, an obvious good: the price.   THE BAD: No glaring mistakes here.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2014
When saying goodbye, weeping can come with the territory. In its own way, the party-starting Baltimore rap duo AK Slaughter knows this painfully well. At a recent cover shoot for their forthcoming and final EP, “It's Not You ... It's Us,” Emily Slaughter and Aran Keating hoped to depict the aftermath of a break-up. They wanted to truly cry for the full effect, but an onion they sliced failed to produce tears. So the two friends improvised. “So then Aran takes the onion juice and puts it against his eyeball,” Slaughter, who described the shoot as “exhausting,” said outside of the Bell Foundry performance space in Station North last week.
Advertisement
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | January 18, 2012
There's a language slip in the online description of the Baltimore Mixtape Project, an effort to inspire young people to express their views about the sorry state of juvenile justice through hip-hop. Describing the project's first contest — called "Battle: Bar None" — the organizers refer to the school-to-prison pipeline that sends thousands of troubled kids out of classrooms and into juvie-jails. "Many of Baltimore's youth are intimately failure with these dynamics," the website says.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
The early candidate for rap album of the year begins with a mother warning her son to stop following in the footsteps of his incarcerated father. The colorfully delivered advice was given to Keenon Daequan Ray Jackson, the 24-year-old rapper better known as YG who performs Wednesday at Baltimore Soundstage. Although YG did not adhere to the counsel (he spent six months in jail for residential burglary before he signed to Def Jam in 2009), the Compton, Calif., MC proved he was on his own path with the release of “My Krazy Life,” an acclaimed first album that debuted at No. 2 on the Billboard 200 in March.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2012
Last year, while working on the independent film "LUV" in Baltimore, Common received the type of treatment typical for a celebrity of his stature. He met the mayor in her office. He played basketball at Carmelo Anthony's gym. But now, reflecting more than a year later, the 40-year-old Chicago-native born Lonnie Rashid Lynn Jr. says it was meeting the people in their communities that made his brief time in Baltimore "one of the best experiences" the rapper and actor ever had. "I was in the heart and soul of Baltimore," said Common, who returns to the area Saturday for the Summer Spirit Festival at Merriweather Post Pavilion . "I definitely felt a connection to the people.
NEWS
October 27, 2010
Wa-aay behind in the polls, the Republican who's trying to unseat Democrat Sen. Barbara Mikulski has resorted to a most unusual Hail Mary pass. Dr. Eric Wargotz has posted a video of his three kids — Jacob, 13; Samuel, 11; and Leila, 9 — singing a campaign rap song. ( See it on YouTube under "Wargotz-Mikulski Rap. " ) Here's a snippet: "Yo, what's up now, my brothers and sisters / Let me tell you 'bout a very smart mister / His name is Eric Wargotz and he's running for Senate / U.S., that is. And he's in it to win it. " Maybe this is part of that hip-hop makeover RNC chief and former Maryland Lt. Gov. Michael Steele vowed to bring the GOP. It is certainly, as Steele promised, "off the hook.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 25, 2006
CHICAGO -- Byron Hurt takes pains to say that he is a fan of hip-hop, but over time, says Hurt, a 36-year-old filmmaker, dreadlocks hanging below his shoulders, "I began to become very conflicted about the music I love." A new documentary by Hurt, Hip Hop: Beyond Beats and Rhymes, questions the violence, degradation of women and homophobia in much of rap music. Scheduled to go on the air in February as part of the PBS series Independent Lens, the documentary is being shown now at high schools, colleges and Boys and Girls Clubs, and in other forums, as part of an unusual public campaign sponsored by the Independent Television Service, which is based in San Francisco and helped finance the film.
NEWS
By Wesley Case | November 29, 2011
Mac Miller isn't the only person in hip-hop making money on his own. Here are five other acts that created their buzz without a major label's help. 1 The Weeknd Abel Tresfaye, aka the Weeknd, is Toronto's enigmatic R&B crooner-on-a-bender whose two free albums from this year, "House of Balloons" and "Thursday," will end up on many best-of-the-year lists. Labels are desperate to sign him, but he's doing just fine thanks to haunting songs and a public friendship with Drake.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Melody Holmes and Melody Holmes,Contributing Writer | April 10, 2000
Alex Hill's hip-hop Web site takes up all of his spare time and doesn't make money. But like so many who have come to love hip-hop, he brings a passion to his hobby. "It's more than something I just do -- it's all I am," says the 36-year-old Sacramento, Calif., programmer who created www.mrblunt.com, an online collection of essays, lyrics, graffiti and other artifacts of hip-hop culture. Hill is a new media artist in the culture of hip-hop, on the leading edge of a musical genre that has virtually exploded online.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | May 11, 2007
The breakdancing film Inside the Circle, a favorite at the recent Maryland Film Festival, currently lacks distribution. But as a movie it dances rings around The Hip Hop Project, which also premiered at the festival but opens nationally today. The Hip Hop Project tells the story of an educational program that began as part of the New York-based Art Start and culminated in the iTunes release of the soundtrack this week. The director of The Hip Hop Project, Matt Ruskin, faced a multitiered challenge.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2013
A quick scan of this year's Virgin Mobile FreeFest reveals the type of lineup we've come to expect from the annual concert at Merriweather Post Pavilion: Smart, on-the-nose and balanced -- as long as you're the type of music fan who takes pride in genre open-mindedness and staying in the loop of new faces and sounds. Taken on a case-by-case basis, the lineup (which is fluid, meaning there could be more artists added) is all over the place: There's house hero Kaskade, feeling-himself-on-Top-40 crooner Robin Thicke, EDM-mashup dude Pretty Lights, chillwave posterboy Washed Out, polarizing surrealists MGMT and the Avett Brothers, the popular folk-rock band trying to convince people a banjo can still be cool.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2013
Outkast remains arguably the greatest rap duo of all time, even though its members - Antwan "Big Boi" Patton and Andre Benjamin, aka Andre 3000 - haven't released an album together since 2006's "Idlewild" soundtrack. While Big Boi continues to release solo albums, Andre has mostly flirted with hip-hop, appearing on guest verses with high-profile artists when he pleases. Last November, Andre made headlines for his contribution to T.I.'s self-reflecting "Sorry. " On it, Andre apologizes to his longtime partner for slowing Outkast down, declining tours and, subsequently, walking away from significant paydays.
EXPLORE
March 11, 2013
The Dance Conservatory of Maryland will hold its annual Contemporary Showcase this month, with proceeds being donated to Center for the Arts. The future Center for the Arts will serve Harford County as a facility, accessible to all, to nurture art, artists and the community in the disciplines of music, dance, theater and the visual and literary arts and Dance Conservatory of Maryland is excited to be able to support such a wonderful cause. The Contemporary Showcase will provide an offering of works from several classes at Dance Conservatory of Maryland, including jazz, tap, hip hop and modern.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2013
The Kennedy Center plans to shake up the Foggy Bottom hood next season. As part of its 2013-2014 lineup, the center will showcase a global pop music phenomenon. Really? Shizzle, man. A week-long festival, "One Mic: Hip-Hop Culture Worldwide," will feature MCing, DJing, B-Boying and more. The National Symphony will even get in the act, performing with the rapper Nas. And you thought the Kennedy Center didn't have game. On a more traditional front, Washington's premiere culture palace will offer the International Theater Festival 2014, with such productions as “A Midsummer Night's Dream” by the Bristol Old Vic from England and South Africa's Handspring Puppet Company.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel, assistant editor, b | January 29, 2013
Many English words derive from Latin. Others from Spanish, American Indian, Norwegian. You name a country, an English word probably came from there. But in the grand history of William Shakespeare, some words are invented by brilliant minds. Derrick E. Vaughan, the president of Dunkadelic Sports Marketing, is one of those modern-day wordsmiths. He said he created the term "dunkadelic" in 1997 in order to find a one-word term that would combine the basketball and hip-hop culture fusion (coincidentally, he's also the creator of National Basketball & Hip-Hop Culture Month)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2012
After Brandy Norwood gave birth to her daughter, Sy'rai, 10 years ago, she was exhausted and ready to leave the entertainment world behind. "I was like, 'I'm good, y'all. I'm good on the music industry,' " Brandy said in a recent interview. "I didn't know who I was, but my daughter was a savior for me. " Motherhood may have eventually refocused her, but the music industry requires hit songs. Although she released two more albums after Sy'rai's birth (2004's "Afrodisiac" and 2008's "Human")
ENTERTAINMENT
By Anna Kaplan and Anna Kaplan,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2003
If you thought the circus and hip-hop couldn't mix, you're in for a surprise. The UniverSoul Circus promises "a special blend of circus, live concert and tent revival" in Soul in the City. America's only African-American-owned and -operated circus will stop in Security Square Mall tomorrow through May 11 as part of its 10th-anniversary tour. The show features a light show, clowns, aerialists, dancers and other acts from around the world. Three actors lead the show, performing everything from stunts to James Brown impressions.
FEATURES
September 26, 2007
CIVIL RIGHTS LANDMARK Sun TV critic David Zurawik discusses Little Rock Central: 50 Years Later at: baltimoresun.com/zurawik HIP HOP Watch a preview of Hip-Hop vs. America at: baltimoresun.com/hiphop
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2012
Calling Wendel Patrick multi-talented is an understatement. The 39-year-old Baltimore resident usually has a Fender Rhodes keyboard, two turntables, effects processors and a microphone for beat boxing and vocal percussion at his shows. When Patrick bumped into Erik Spangler (aka: DJ Dubble8) after a closing performance at last year's Artscape, they talked about creating an improv-based hip-hop series. Last November, they created the Baltimore Boom Bap Society, which now performs monthly shows around the city.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2012
Last year, while working on the independent film "LUV" in Baltimore, Common received the type of treatment typical for a celebrity of his stature. He met the mayor in her office. He played basketball at Carmelo Anthony's gym. But now, reflecting more than a year later, the 40-year-old Chicago-native born Lonnie Rashid Lynn Jr. says it was meeting the people in their communities that made his brief time in Baltimore "one of the best experiences" the rapper and actor ever had. "I was in the heart and soul of Baltimore," said Common, who returns to the area Saturday for the Summer Spirit Festival at Merriweather Post Pavilion . "I definitely felt a connection to the people.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.