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NEWS
October 19, 2005
On October 13, 2005 JAMES F. HINSON JR. Friends may call at the family owned MARCH FUNERAL HOME WEST, INC., 4300 Wabash Avenue on Thursday after 8:30 a.m. where the family will receive friends on Friday at 11:30 a.m. followed by funeral service at 12 noon. See www.marchfh.com.
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NEWS
July 2, 2008
Baltimore North side Three officers hurt in collision with car Three city police officers responding to a fellow officer's call for assistance and the driver of a Chevrolet compact car were injured yesterday when their vehicles collided near the former site of Memorial Stadium, police said. The officers were taken by city Fire Department ambulances to Maryland Shock Trauma Center, were they were treated for injuries that were not life-threatening, said Major Dennis Smith, deputy commander of the Northern District.
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NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | October 6, 1997
John Kershaw Hinson, a pioneering Maryland aviator who was the first person to fly in and out of what is now Baltimore-Washington International Airport when it opened in 1950, died of natural causes Saturday at North Arundel Hospital in Glen Burnie. He was 89 and lived in Hanover.A pilot for nearly 60 years, Mr. Hinson taught flying and sold airplanes to thousands of people in the Baltimore area."He just loved to fly," said a son, Dallas Hinson of Baltimore. "He was the first pilot to land at BWI -- and this was during its construction."
NEWS
October 19, 2005
On October 13, 2005 JAMES F. HINSON JR. Friends may call at the family owned MARCH FUNERAL HOME WEST, INC., 4300 Wabash Avenue on Thursday after 8:30 a.m. where the family will receive friends on Friday at 11:30 a.m. followed by funeral service at 12 noon. See www.marchfh.com.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | October 24, 1995
There aren't too many reminders left, a beat-up wooden counter where business was transacted, a weathered "Hinson Airways" sign, and some old rubber tires used to tie down aircraft out by the runway.But the legacy of John K. Hinson will live on. Last week, officials at Baltimore-Washington International Airport gathered to honor Mr. Hinson and to praise his six-decade-long contributions to Maryland aviation."He's the classiest operator that we've had," said Nicholas J. Shaus, BWI's deputy administrator.
NEWS
October 6, 1999
Sue C. Thrasher-Hinson, 80, director of flight schoolSue C. Thrasher-Hinson, retired director of Hinson Airways Flight School, died yesterday of lung cancer at her home in Hanover. She was 80.Mrs. Hinson retired in 1996 from the flight school that was part of Hinson Airways, founded by her late husband, John K. Hinson, in 1945 at the old Harbor Field in Dundalk. The airline moved to Friendship Airport, now Baltimore-Washington International Airport, in 1962.The former Sue C. Tiano was born in Clarksburg, W. Va., where she graduated from high school.
NEWS
By Larry B. Stammer and Larry B. Stammer,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 7, 2004
PITTSBURGH - A leading Methodist evangelical pastor called yesterday for a split in the denomination over the issue of homosexuality - a sign of a widening fissure in the United States' second-largest Protestant church. "Our friends on the other side are not going to leave the church," the Rev. William H. Hinson said. "We're not going to leave the church. They will not stop their struggle. We will not stop ours. It is therefore incumbent, we believe, upon us to have a just and amiable separation."
NEWS
By Sally Voris and Sally Voris,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 17, 2000
KENNY LIVESAY and Jeff Hinson met early Thursday morning to go bow hunting. They parked in front of their Elkridge store, packed equipment and hot coffee into their pickups and drove down U.S. 1 past the bright lights of the all-night convenience stores and gas stations. The two owners of Grizzly's Archery Supplies & Hunts drove to the end of a dead-end road. They sprayed themselves with a woodsy scent and walked silently into the woods. They were carrying bows, arrows and 25-pound steel tree stands.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | October 25, 1995
Eugene A. Hinson Jr., owner of Dad and Sons Discount Hobbies Inc., has an odd business strategy. "We take a loss in order to gain a product, and we give that product away."Customers at his Glen Burnie store get a 10 percent discount for any donation of money, canned food or toys they bring in for the area's needy families.The discount is good for any of the miniature locomotives, train stations, hand-made display accessories, metal detectors, model cars and other hobby items neatly packed into his two-room shop on Thelma Avenue near Crain Highway.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 19, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The Federal Aviation Administration, acknowledging for the first time that its ability to enforce airline safety standards was in question, announced historic changes yesterday in the way it oversees the airline industry.Among them, Transportation Secretary Federico F. Pena recommended that Congress amend the FAA's legislative charter by eliminating its role in promoting air commerce and making safety its sole mission.In addition, the agency said its longtime safety czar, Anthony J. Broderick, would leave at the end of next week.
NEWS
By Larry B. Stammer and Larry B. Stammer,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 7, 2004
PITTSBURGH - A leading Methodist evangelical pastor called yesterday for a split in the denomination over the issue of homosexuality - a sign of a widening fissure in the United States' second-largest Protestant church. "Our friends on the other side are not going to leave the church," the Rev. William H. Hinson said. "We're not going to leave the church. They will not stop their struggle. We will not stop ours. It is therefore incumbent, we believe, upon us to have a just and amiable separation."
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | March 28, 2003
LAKELAND, Fla. - Darnell Hinson scored a game-high 18 points and converted five three-pointers to lead Northeastern (Okla.) State to an 84-69 win over Queens (N.C.) in the NCAA Division II men's semifinals last night. Hinson was one of six Redmen scoring in double figures as Northeastern State (31-3) advanced to the NCAA Division II men's basketball championship game for the first time in school history. The Redmen will meet Kentucky Wesleyan (31-3) tomorrow at 1 p.m. "They did a great job of following the game plan," said Northeastern State head coach Larry Gipson.
NEWS
By Sally Voris and Sally Voris,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 17, 2000
KENNY LIVESAY and Jeff Hinson met early Thursday morning to go bow hunting. They parked in front of their Elkridge store, packed equipment and hot coffee into their pickups and drove down U.S. 1 past the bright lights of the all-night convenience stores and gas stations. The two owners of Grizzly's Archery Supplies & Hunts drove to the end of a dead-end road. They sprayed themselves with a woodsy scent and walked silently into the woods. They were carrying bows, arrows and 25-pound steel tree stands.
NEWS
October 6, 1999
Sue C. Thrasher-Hinson, 80, director of flight schoolSue C. Thrasher-Hinson, retired director of Hinson Airways Flight School, died yesterday of lung cancer at her home in Hanover. She was 80.Mrs. Hinson retired in 1996 from the flight school that was part of Hinson Airways, founded by her late husband, John K. Hinson, in 1945 at the old Harbor Field in Dundalk. The airline moved to Friendship Airport, now Baltimore-Washington International Airport, in 1962.The former Sue C. Tiano was born in Clarksburg, W. Va., where she graduated from high school.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | October 6, 1997
John Kershaw Hinson, a pioneering Maryland aviator who was the first person to fly in and out of what is now Baltimore-Washington International Airport when it opened in 1950, died of natural causes Saturday at North Arundel Hospital in Glen Burnie. He was 89 and lived in Hanover.A pilot for nearly 60 years, Mr. Hinson taught flying and sold airplanes to thousands of people in the Baltimore area."He just loved to fly," said a son, Dallas Hinson of Baltimore. "He was the first pilot to land at BWI -- and this was during its construction."
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 19, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The Federal Aviation Administration, acknowledging for the first time that its ability to enforce airline safety standards was in question, announced historic changes yesterday in the way it oversees the airline industry.Among them, Transportation Secretary Federico F. Pena recommended that Congress amend the FAA's legislative charter by eliminating its role in promoting air commerce and making safety its sole mission.In addition, the agency said its longtime safety czar, Anthony J. Broderick, would leave at the end of next week.
SPORTS
By John W. Stewart and John W. Stewart,Staff Writer | October 14, 1993
Before C. Milton Wright played at Bel Air last night, Mustangs coach Ken Dawson pointed out to his unbeaten team that five years ago, a scoreless tie with Bel Air kept his squad from winning a Harford County girls soccer title.It didn't happen this time, but it did take No. 5 C. M. Wright (8-0-1, 4-0) most of the game to ensure a 2-0 victory. Second-half goals by junior Nicki Kaminski and sophomore Miranda James off feeds from freshman Erin Lesh got the job done.This one was a matter of speed, with the visitors having a decided edge.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 18, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The Federal Aviation Administration shut down ValuJet indefinitely last night, saying an intense evaluation begun after one of the airline's planes crashed in the Everglades on May 11 had turned up "serious deficiencies" in its operations.David R. Hinson, the FAA's administrator, said at a brief news conference that ValuJet had failed to establish the "airworthiness" of some of its aircraft and that "multiple shortcomings" had been found in its supervision of maintenance contractors.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 18, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The Federal Aviation Administration shut down ValuJet indefinitely last night, saying an intense evaluation begun after one of the airline's planes crashed in the Everglades on May 11 had turned up "serious deficiencies" in its operations.David R. Hinson, the FAA's administrator, said at a brief news conference that ValuJet had failed to establish the "airworthiness" of some of its aircraft and that "multiple shortcomings" had been found in its supervision of maintenance contractors.
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