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By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2001
Towson resident Nikhil Talati might have been among the first in America to learn of the powerful earthquake that devastated northwestern India and killed thousands nine days ago. Within minutes of the 7.7 temblor, he was getting an eyewitness account from his wife - by phone. Yesterday, Neha Talati shared her experience with about 200 worshippers who gathered at the Greater Baltimore Temple in Finksburg to pray and to raise money for earthquake victims. By the end of the day, members of the Hindu temple had raised more than $53,000, organizers said.
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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 8, 2006
NEW DELHI -- Bomb blasts in a crowded Hindu temple and a railway station left at least 12 people dead and dozens seriously wounded yesterday in the holy city of Varanasi, government officials said. One explosion rocked the Hindu Sankatmochan temple complex, one of the ancient city's oldest Hindu places of worship, as hundreds of people were gathered inside. The second bomb detonated minutes later at 6:35 p.m. in a railway station's second-class waiting room, police said. An express train bound for India's capital, New Delhi, was waiting at a nearby platform for a scheduled departure in 10 minutes.
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NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | July 19, 1992
Sushma Swani's son was raised in a Hindu family in Roland Park. But it was not until he went to Princeton and took a course in Hinduism that he truly discovered his Indian roots.Now Mrs. Swani hopes to make that discovery easier for other Indian-American children. She is among a group of Hindus -- largely prosperous, middle-aged professionals whose children are coming of age -- who want to build the Baltimore area's first Hindu temple."We need to turn to our gods in times of birth, death and marriage," said Mrs. Swani, a middle school teacher.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2001
Towson resident Nikhil Talati might have been among the first in America to learn of the powerful earthquake that devastated northwestern India and killed thousands nine days ago. Within minutes of the 7.7 temblor, he was getting an eyewitness account from his wife - by phone. Yesterday, Neha Talati shared her experience with about 200 worshippers who gathered at the Greater Baltimore Temple in Finksburg to pray and to raise money for earthquake victims. By the end of the day, members of the Hindu temple had raised more than $53,000, organizers said.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | April 20, 1997
For the nearly 1,600 Hindu families in the metropolitan area, a five-acre site in Finksburg will soon become a worship and cultural center.After five years of fund raising, the group broke ground for the $1.7 million Greater Baltimore Temple last month. The 20,000-square-foot complex will include prayer and assembly halls, private prayer areas, a library and offices for a pujari, or priest."We will have more than enough people to fill the temple," said Dr. Chitrachedu Naganna, a Westminster cardiologist and chairman of the the building campaign.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | April 20, 1997
For the nearly 1,600 Hindu families in the metropolitan area, a five-acre site in Finksburg will soon become a worship and cultural center.After five years of fund raising, the group broke ground for the $1.7 million Greater Baltimore Temple last month. The 20,000-square-foot complex will include prayer and assembly halls, private prayer areas, a library and offices for a pujari, or priest."We will have more than enough people to fill the temple," said Dr. Chitrachedu Naganna, a Westminster cardiologist and chairman of the the building campaign.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN STAFF | December 12, 1998
For months, the 48-foot lighted tower poking mysteriously above the billboards, pastures and new large-lot developments of Finksburg raised speculation and, at times, fear among its neighbors.Patrons of nearby Jubilee Foods pushed their shopping carts and gawked. At various stages of construction, the gleaming building has been mistaken for a synagogue, a shopping center and a Mexican restaurant.The questions and stares came as no surprise to the founders of the Baltimore region's first Hindu temple.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | December 22, 1991
MALACCA, Malaysia -- The monsoon winds blew tall trading ships to Malacca for centuries, east from India and west from China, laden with silk and spice and the great cultures of the world.Muslims were the first to arrive, followed by the Chinese and then the Portuguese, who fell to the Dutch, who gave way to the British, who brought in the Indians.And so Malacca remains to this day a bowl of curry noodles and a mug of Guinness Stout, as interesting as one of its fabled antique shops on Jonker Street, unspoiled by the "progress" that has helped turn Kuala Lumpur and Singapore intoglass-and-steel boom towns searching for their souls.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 8, 2006
NEW DELHI -- Bomb blasts in a crowded Hindu temple and a railway station left at least 12 people dead and dozens seriously wounded yesterday in the holy city of Varanasi, government officials said. One explosion rocked the Hindu Sankatmochan temple complex, one of the ancient city's oldest Hindu places of worship, as hundreds of people were gathered inside. The second bomb detonated minutes later at 6:35 p.m. in a railway station's second-class waiting room, police said. An express train bound for India's capital, New Delhi, was waiting at a nearby platform for a scheduled departure in 10 minutes.
NEWS
July 4, 2006
DR. VED PARKASH, D.V.M., Ph.D., loving husband and devoted father, of Salisbury, MD passed away Wednesday, June 21, 2006. Dr. Parkash was born in Sibi, India, and received his D.V.M. from the Punjab College of Veterinary Medicine in Hissar, India. He then immigrated to the United States to study at the University of Missouri in Columbia, Mo. He received his master's degree in veterinary medicine and surgery and his Ph.D. in reproductive endocrinology from the University of Missouri. Dr. Parkash continued his training as a post-doctoral fellow at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN STAFF | December 12, 1998
For months, the 48-foot lighted tower poking mysteriously above the billboards, pastures and new large-lot developments of Finksburg raised speculation and, at times, fear among its neighbors.Patrons of nearby Jubilee Foods pushed their shopping carts and gawked. At various stages of construction, the gleaming building has been mistaken for a synagogue, a shopping center and a Mexican restaurant.The questions and stares came as no surprise to the founders of the Baltimore region's first Hindu temple.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | April 20, 1997
For the nearly 1,600 Hindu families in the metropolitan area, a five-acre site in Finksburg will soon become a worship and cultural center.After five years of fund raising, the group broke ground for the $1.7 million Greater Baltimore Temple last month. The 20,000-square-foot complex will include prayer and assembly halls, private prayer areas, a library and offices for a pujari, or priest."We will have more than enough people to fill the temple," said Dr. Chitrachedu Naganna, a Westminster cardiologist and chairman of the the building campaign.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | April 20, 1997
For the nearly 1,600 Hindu families in the metropolitan area, a five-acre site in Finksburg will soon become a worship and cultural center.After five years of fund raising, the group broke ground for the $1.7 million Greater Baltimore Temple last month. The 20,000-square-foot complex will include prayer and assembly halls, private prayer areas, a library and offices for a pujari, or priest."We will have more than enough people to fill the temple," said Dr. Chitrachedu Naganna, a Westminster cardiologist and chairman of the the building campaign.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | July 19, 1992
Sushma Swani's son was raised in a Hindu family in Roland Park. But it was not until he went to Princeton and took a course in Hinduism that he truly discovered his Indian roots.Now Mrs. Swani hopes to make that discovery easier for other Indian-American children. She is among a group of Hindus -- largely prosperous, middle-aged professionals whose children are coming of age -- who want to build the Baltimore area's first Hindu temple."We need to turn to our gods in times of birth, death and marriage," said Mrs. Swani, a middle school teacher.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | December 22, 1991
MALACCA, Malaysia -- The monsoon winds blew tall trading ships to Malacca for centuries, east from India and west from China, laden with silk and spice and the great cultures of the world.Muslims were the first to arrive, followed by the Chinese and then the Portuguese, who fell to the Dutch, who gave way to the British, who brought in the Indians.And so Malacca remains to this day a bowl of curry noodles and a mug of Guinness Stout, as interesting as one of its fabled antique shops on Jonker Street, unspoiled by the "progress" that has helped turn Kuala Lumpur and Singapore intoglass-and-steel boom towns searching for their souls.
NEWS
July 11, 1991
For three years, New York developer Dean Gitter was unable to fulfill his dream of Worldbridge Centre, an Asian-themed cultural, trade and investment complex. Then Westinghouse Corp. took over as project manager for the complex, which supposedly will be built on 1,000 acres of vacant land in Middle River. Westinghouse's respected name raised hopes that the $1 billion project would quickly take shape and become reality.Yet almost a year after Westinghouse entered the Worldbridge development process, there is even more confusion than before in Baltimore County about exactly what is being planned for that "Asia Pacific Worldpark."
NEWS
April 6, 1995
India's Congress Party has long since lost its dominance over the nation's political landscape. The spearhead of India's independence movement and party of Jawaharlal Nehru and Indira Gandhi, Congress has twice been swept from power nationally. Once a monolith that dwarfed all competition, it is now broken into factions which identify as much with personalities as principles. So the loss of a couple of state elections, even in key areas, doesn't cause any shock waves.But the nature of the victors should.
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