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By New York Times News Service | February 23, 1993
NEW DELHI, India -- New Delhi is a city under siege as it braces for an enormous demonstration by Hindu fundamentalists to be held Thursday.The government has banned the demonstration, and fears of violent confrontations between fervent Hindu militants and the police are sweeping the city even as security forces try to seal this capital off from the rest of India.Thousands of Hindu leaders and potential demonstrators are being rounded up by police, trains pulling into the city's three stations are being checked for Hindu protesters, and the roads into the capital have been sealed to motor caravans of Hindus militants.
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By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
Priya DasSarma's childhood memories of celebrating Diwali in India are bright and happy, filled with firecrackers, lanterns and many, many sweets. The Ellicott City resident's family moved around when she was a child, bouncing between India, Europe and the United States, but she's held on to those memories of light and sugar. "From a child's perspective, it's all about the sweets," she says with a laugh, recalling her family's fondness for a milky, nutty treat called halva.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 30, 1998
NEW DELHI, India -- As vote tallies piled up yesterday in a series of important state elections, the humiliating defeat of the Hindu nationalists and the stunning resurrection of India's once-dominant Congress Party became ever more starkly apparent.Voters outraged by the spiraling prices of onions, tomatoes and potatoes -- essentials of the Indian diet -- swept the Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party from office by landslide margins where it had been deeply entrenched. The party lost in Delhi, the district that includes the nation's capital, and in the Hindi heartland state of Rajasthan.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | September 22, 2013
A couple months ago, I got an email from Supreet. Supreet is in the 11th grade. He shops at Wal-Mart and plays basketball. His father came to this country from India and both are Sikhs, followers of a centuries-old faith founded in the Punjab region. Supreet wanted to tell me what it is like being a Sikh in America. He wrote about how, after 9/11, his father became "perhaps the most hated man in our small town. " He wrote about how his dad had to stop wearing the turban Sikh men use to cover their "kesh," the hair their faith forbids them to cut. He wrote about bullying and depression suffered by young Sikhs.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 1, 1998
COIMBATORE, India -- India's general election came to a tense end yesterday as voters in this southern textile city joined 150 million others in choosing between Sonia Gandhi's vision of a secular India and a rival vision of a country dominated politically by the culture and preferences of its 700 million Hindus.When results begin flowing in Tuesday, India will know whether a seven-week election campaign produced a return to government by the Congress Party, whose frayed banner Gandhi carried, or a historic turn to the Hindu nationalists of the Bharatiya Janata Party.
NEWS
October 16, 1999
INDIAN PRIME MINISTER Atal Bihari Vajpayee and his Bharatiya Janata Party stand for Hindu identity and traditional, even reactionary, values. But the practical effect of their rule, is to modernize India, which may be the last thing they want culturally.By sweeping away the socialism and bureaucratism of a half-century of mostly Congress Party rule, Mr. Vajpayee and the BJP ushered in the free market and Asia's latest economic miracle.The next Vajpayee government will still be subject to regional party defection at any time on any issue, but looms stronger and stabler than Indian government has been lately.
NEWS
May 24, 2001
THE INTENTION of Afghanistan's rulers to compel the Hindu minority to wear identifying clothing is a throwback to Nazi Germany's requirement that Jews wear a yellow Star of David in the 1930s, the first preparation for the Holocaust. The announcement provoked anger in the Hindu majority in India, where tensions threaten the huge Muslim minority. Unhappily, this action by the Ministry for the Promotion of Virtue and Prevention of Vice is in character for Afghanistan's ruling Islamic reactionaries, the Taliban.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 5, 2002
NEW DELHI, India - Sounding like a stern father mortified by the misdeeds of his children, Prime Minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee visited the riot-torn state of Gujarat yesterday and called for an end to the continuing violence that has pitted Muslims against Hindus and left at least 815 people dead. "People were burned to death just yesterday," he said angrily. "In our country the funeral pyre is used after death. But a person being burned alive is beyond my imagination. Have we forgotten our human qualities?
NEWS
May 14, 1996
INDIAN VOTERS deserted the ruling Congress Party by the hundreds of millions in the largest free election ever held. Out of the chaos will come a coalition government. It will be led either by leftists representing low-caste Hindus, Muslims and Marxists; or by high-caste Hindu extremists who would abolish the secular laws and protections for minorities and launch a nuclear arms race.The Congress Party, in power most of the time since 1947, rolled back British imperialism. The Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP)
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 8, 2006
NEW DELHI -- Bomb blasts in a crowded Hindu temple and a railway station left at least 12 people dead and dozens seriously wounded yesterday in the holy city of Varanasi, government officials said. One explosion rocked the Hindu Sankatmochan temple complex, one of the ancient city's oldest Hindu places of worship, as hundreds of people were gathered inside. The second bomb detonated minutes later at 6:35 p.m. in a railway station's second-class waiting room, police said. An express train bound for India's capital, New Delhi, was waiting at a nearby platform for a scheduled departure in 10 minutes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2013
In one way or another, Manil Suri has spent his entire life charting what happens when polar opposites are brought together in unexpected and at times startling juxtapositions. Suri, 53, is an acclaimed novelist, and a career mathematician who teaches at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. He spent the first two decades of his life in India and the past three in the United States. Though all his books to date have been set in Mumbai, they are written in English. Suri's debut novel, "The Death of Vishnu," set off a bidding war between 11 publishing houses in 2001.
TRAVEL
March 8, 2009
India: People/Place/Culture/History DK, $40 India is a vast land, boasting famously high mountains (the Himalayas), fertile valleys (Assam is the heart of the country's tea industry), arid deserts and densely packed cities (Mumbai is among the most populated). This gorgeously photographed coffee-table book captures the immense country in all of its complicated glory. The long history section tells the story of the first prehistoric settlements, follows the emergence of regional kingdoms and the rise of the so-called Golden Age, the coming of Islam and India under British rule before discussing the state of contemporary India.
NEWS
By Martha Nussbaum | December 2, 2008
If, as the evidence indicates, last week's terrible events in Mumbai were the work of Islamic terrorists, that's more bad news for India's minority Muslim population. Never mind that the perpetrators were probably funded from outside India, in connection with the conflict over Kashmir. The attacks will feed a powerful stereotype of the violent and untrustworthy Muslim, bent on religious conquest, who can never be a good democratic citizen. Such stereotypes already shadow the lives of Indian Muslims, who make up 13.5 percent of the population.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jennifer Choi and Jennifer Choi,Sun reporter | May 15, 2008
The home of the Happy Meal never fails to give Vijai Nathan a feeling of security. It even helped lead her on a lifelong quest for identity and spiritual truths. In her one-woman autobiographical show, McGoddess: Big Macs, Karma & the American Dream, which opens Saturday at the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, the comedian reveals how McDonald's, a Hindu mother, a born-again Christian sister, a semi-atheist father and her experience as a second-generation Indian-American made her question faith and influenced her self-perception.
NEWS
By Madison Park and Madison Park,Sun Reporter | May 20, 2007
Chanting "Hare Krishna, Hare Krishna," hundreds of believers of the Hindu sect dragged a crimson 30-foot-high chariot cloaked in sunflowers, carnations and roses. Wrapped in colorful clothing, they marched down Light Street yesterday afternoon and ended in the Inner Harbor, stalling traffic and drawing curious stares. This was the local version of Rathayatra, an Indian religious chariot parade. Figures of the three Hindu deities -- Krishna, Balarama and Subhadra -- are taken from a temple and placed on the elaborately decorated chariot.
NEWS
By Arthur J. Magida | September 24, 2006
"Sh'ma Yisrael Adonai Elohaynu Adonai Echad." "Hear, oh Israel, the Lord our God, the Lord is One." That one sentence is the essential, elemental creed of Judaism. But what God is that? A Christian God? A Jewish God? A Muslim God? A Hindu God? (Although it may be more correct to say, Hindu gods, because Hindus have hundreds of thousands, maybe even several million gods.) I'm certainly not talking about a Buddhist God, as God has no place in Buddhism. Everyone, in every faith, approaches God in his own time and his own fashion.
NEWS
March 21, 1998
THE LAST TIME Atal Behari Vajpayee was sworn in as prime minister of India, his regime lasted 12 days. On the 13th, in 1996, he resigned rather than lose a confidence vote in parliament. Now he is in office again, with a better chance, though still heading a coalition commanding only a minority of votes, needing the silent acquiescence of more to stay in power.Mr. Vajpayee's Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) represents Hindu power and tradition of the vast majority of India's 952 million people, repudiating the secularism of the founding Congress Party.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 28, 1993
NEW DELHI, India -- A day after about 100,000 police and paramilitary troops turned the heart of India's capital into an armed camp and fought thousands of anti-government Hindu activists with tear gas and bamboo batons, the city turned Friday to a more important matter: cricket.Televisions and radios in homes, sari shops, doctors' offices and street stalls were carefully tuned to the daylong cricket match in Bangalore that pitted India's finest against England's all-stars.That the country could turn its attention so quickly to bowlers and batsmen was perhaps the most telling sign that the threat to the embattled government of Prime Minister P. V. Narasimha Rao by the Hindu fundamentalist Bharatiya Janata Party had passed, at least for the moment.
NEWS
By LAURA MCCANDLISH and LAURA MCCANDLISH,SUN REPORTER | August 20, 2006
The women are dressed in kaleidoscopic colors, dancing in a whirling pinwheel and tapping wooden sticks with their neighbors' to keep the beat. Their white-robed priest leads the congregation in chants, offering fruit and fragrant flower garlands to the gods who stand watch on marble pedestals. As the night wears on, children rub their eyes and grandmothers yawn, waiting for midnight. That's when they can finally celebrate the birth of the baby Krishna, the most venerated Hindu god, the protector of the universe.
NEWS
By LAURA MCCANDLISH and LAURA MCCANDLISH,SUN REPORTER | August 20, 2006
The women are dressed in kaleidoscopic colors, dancing in a whirling pinwheel and tapping wooden sticks with their neighbors' to keep the beat. Their white-robed priest leads the congregation in chants, offering fruit and fragrant flower garlands to the gods who stand watch on marble pedestals. As the night wears on, children rub their eyes and grandmothers yawn, waiting for midnight. That's when they can finally celebrate the birth of the baby Krishna, the most venerated Hindu god, the protector of the universe.
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