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February 2, 2000
George McTurnan Kahin, 82, a Cornell University professor and author who was one of the nation's leading scholars of Southeast Asia, died Saturday in Ithaca, N.Y. David Levy, 87, the former network executive who created "The Addams Family" television comedy, died Jan. 25 in Los Angeles. Rudolph W. Patzert, 88, a sea captain who broke through the British blockade of Palestine to move Holocaust survivors to their historic homeland after World War II, died Jan. 21 in Encinitas, Calif. He had battled melanoma.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2010
About three dozen students formed rows in the Duncan Hall lobby of Howard Community College and staged an impromptu demonstration of tai chi, a Chinese martial art known for its slow but precise movements. Some students were clearly novices, yet their cadence showed that, at the very least, they were fast learners. The students are enrolled in an intensive summer language program called STARTALK, a federal government initiative designed to increase the number of Americans learning so-called "critical need" languages.
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NEWS
By ANDREW ZAJAC and ANDREW ZAJAC,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 22, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Three northwest Ohio men studied the use of suicide belts and homemade bombs in a plot to carry out attacks against U.S. troops in Iraq and other overseas targets, according to a five-count conspiracy indictment unsealed yesterday in Cleveland. The plot included plans to set up a dummy foundation to raise money, funneling funds and computers to co-conspirators in the Middle East, and recruiting at least two people for jihadist training, court papers state. Officials declined to say how advanced the plot was. But, in a sign of its importance to the Justice Department, Attorney General Alberto R. Gonzales and John Pistole, deputy FBI director, announced the charges in Washington.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun reporter | May 19, 2007
With no microphones for a sound check, Hari Prabhakar let his singers down to a basement corridor to rehearse. Four bobbed their index fingers to the music, altos and sopranos harmonizing "hai, hai, hai, hai" -- a Hindi version of "yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah." The members of Kranti practiced the new Bollywood song, "Salaam-E-Ishq" (A Tribute to Love). Then they tackled "Desi Back," a South Asian spoof on Justin Timberlake's "Sexy Back" that the female singers penned. With a demo CD of Hindi pop and folk songs now recorded and a watershed concert staged this spring, the Indian vocal group at the Johns Hopkins University has joined the next wave in collegiate a cappella.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun reporter | May 19, 2007
With no microphones for a sound check, Hari Prabhakar let his singers down to a basement corridor to rehearse. Four bobbed their index fingers to the music, altos and sopranos harmonizing "hai, hai, hai, hai" -- a Hindi version of "yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah." The members of Kranti practiced the new Bollywood song, "Salaam-E-Ishq" (A Tribute to Love). Then they tackled "Desi Back," a South Asian spoof on Justin Timberlake's "Sexy Back" that the female singers penned. With a demo CD of Hindi pop and folk songs now recorded and a watershed concert staged this spring, the Indian vocal group at the Johns Hopkins University has joined the next wave in collegiate a cappella.
NEWS
By RONA MARECH and RONA MARECH,SUN REPORTER | January 6, 2006
Arms are curving up toward the sky; limber bodies are bouncing, charged. As the pumping music races, the dance moves are by turn angular and choppy, then elegant and wispy. Anupama Prasad, a Johns Hopkins University student and one of the organizers of this dance rehearsal, is smiling in the front, mouthing the words to the songs. As the music slips seamlessly from Sean Paul's "We Be Burnin'" to "Akhiyan Na Maar" from the Indian film Ek Khiladi Ek Hassena, she quietly breathes out a mixture of Hindi and English words.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Indira A. R. Lakshmanan and Indira A. R. Lakshmanan,Boston Globe | March 28, 1999
BOMBAY, India -- Fans of the world's largest film industry were unlikely to tune in for the Academy Awards. After all, their favorite stars carried off their trophies more than a week ago right here in Bollywood.Bollywood, as Bombay is known to fans of Indian cinema, is the capital of an industry that produces some 800 feature films a year in several Indian languages. That's well over double the number made in Hollywood, and almost one-fifth of the world's total. Revenue from India's colorful song-and-dance extravaganzas and melodramas surpasses $1 billion a year.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 7, 2002
JERUSALEM - Israeli Foreign Minister Shimon Peres may be one of the few Israeli officials left who believe there is a chance for peace in the Middle East. With fighting at unprecedented levels and casualties mounting, Peres remains a member of Prime Minister Ariel Sharon's government despite sharp disagreements over how to end the Palestinian uprising. Sharon, 73, insists that intensified military action will force an end to the violence. Peres, 78, insists that the violence can be ended only through talks.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2010
About three dozen students formed rows in the Duncan Hall lobby of Howard Community College and staged an impromptu demonstration of tai chi, a Chinese martial art known for its slow but precise movements. Some students were clearly novices, yet their cadence showed that, at the very least, they were fast learners. The students are enrolled in an intensive summer language program called STARTALK, a federal government initiative designed to increase the number of Americans learning so-called "critical need" languages.
NEWS
By Indira A. R. Lakshmanan and Indira A. R. Lakshmanan,BOSTON GLOBE | September 22, 1997
CALCUTTA, India -- Shona Bose's parents gave her all the freedoms afforded to progressive, upper-middle-class Indian youngsters of the 1990s. She attended a coeducational college, was encouraged to get a job with a foreign bank here, went to discos with friends and was told that she could marry whomever she fell in love with.But when the time came to settle down, Bose -- like most other Westernized young urban professionals -- chose the tradition forced upon her elders: arranged marriage.
NEWS
By ANDREW ZAJAC and ANDREW ZAJAC,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 22, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Three northwest Ohio men studied the use of suicide belts and homemade bombs in a plot to carry out attacks against U.S. troops in Iraq and other overseas targets, according to a five-count conspiracy indictment unsealed yesterday in Cleveland. The plot included plans to set up a dummy foundation to raise money, funneling funds and computers to co-conspirators in the Middle East, and recruiting at least two people for jihadist training, court papers state. Officials declined to say how advanced the plot was. But, in a sign of its importance to the Justice Department, Attorney General Alberto R. Gonzales and John Pistole, deputy FBI director, announced the charges in Washington.
NEWS
By RONA MARECH and RONA MARECH,SUN REPORTER | January 6, 2006
Arms are curving up toward the sky; limber bodies are bouncing, charged. As the pumping music races, the dance moves are by turn angular and choppy, then elegant and wispy. Anupama Prasad, a Johns Hopkins University student and one of the organizers of this dance rehearsal, is smiling in the front, mouthing the words to the songs. As the music slips seamlessly from Sean Paul's "We Be Burnin'" to "Akhiyan Na Maar" from the Indian film Ek Khiladi Ek Hassena, she quietly breathes out a mixture of Hindi and English words.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 7, 2002
JERUSALEM - Israeli Foreign Minister Shimon Peres may be one of the few Israeli officials left who believe there is a chance for peace in the Middle East. With fighting at unprecedented levels and casualties mounting, Peres remains a member of Prime Minister Ariel Sharon's government despite sharp disagreements over how to end the Palestinian uprising. Sharon, 73, insists that intensified military action will force an end to the violence. Peres, 78, insists that the violence can be ended only through talks.
NEWS
February 2, 2000
George McTurnan Kahin, 82, a Cornell University professor and author who was one of the nation's leading scholars of Southeast Asia, died Saturday in Ithaca, N.Y. David Levy, 87, the former network executive who created "The Addams Family" television comedy, died Jan. 25 in Los Angeles. Rudolph W. Patzert, 88, a sea captain who broke through the British blockade of Palestine to move Holocaust survivors to their historic homeland after World War II, died Jan. 21 in Encinitas, Calif. He had battled melanoma.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Indira A. R. Lakshmanan and Indira A. R. Lakshmanan,Boston Globe | March 28, 1999
BOMBAY, India -- Fans of the world's largest film industry were unlikely to tune in for the Academy Awards. After all, their favorite stars carried off their trophies more than a week ago right here in Bollywood.Bollywood, as Bombay is known to fans of Indian cinema, is the capital of an industry that produces some 800 feature films a year in several Indian languages. That's well over double the number made in Hollywood, and almost one-fifth of the world's total. Revenue from India's colorful song-and-dance extravaganzas and melodramas surpasses $1 billion a year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2011
Radhika Sule, who sells freshly prepared Indian food under the Rustic Gourmet banner at area farmers' markets, confirms that she'll be moving into the Soup's On space on the Avenue in Hampden. The opening date is planned for Aug. 15. Sule says that the storefront cafe will operate under a new name -- The Verandah . I told Sule that "veranda" -- from the Urdu or Hindi, acrcording to Merriam-Webster -- was one of the prettiest words in the English language. She said that's why she chose it.
NEWS
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,Special to the Sun | December 17, 2006
The Story of French Jean-Benoit Nadeau and Julie Barlow St. Martin's Press / 483 pages / $25.95 Once the world's pre-eminent language, today French ranks only ninth among the top 15 languages. Although French is spoken by about 175 million people, called francophones, and is an official language in 41 countries, most of them members of an organization called La Francophonie, it's far behind Chinese, Hindi, Spanish and English, and on a par with Portuguese. In The Story of French, Jean-Benoit Nadeau and Julie Barlow cover the people, places and events behind the rise and fall of the French language.
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