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November 17, 1999
Bad weather kept climbers led by Maryland's Chris Warner from reaching the summit of Ama Dablam, a 22,584-foot peak in the Himalayas.The weekend attempt had an online audience: Maryland schoolchildren who kept in touch with the climbers via the Internet and e-mail through Shared Summits, a nonprofit educational program of Earth Treks, the climbing center in Columbia.Here is part of climber Jimmy Rockelman's report on Saturday's summit attempt, as filed on the Earth Treks Web site, earthtreks-climbing.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2010
Doris Stepanovich, a retired bereavement counselor and secretary who was the subject of news articles after the remains of her Army pilot husband were discovered in the Himalayas nearly 50 years after his death during World War II, died of heart failure Sept. 12 at Best Care Assisted Living in Reisterstown. She was 87 and lived in West Hills. In 1993, nearly 49 years after she had been told that her husband, Frank Ramos, was missing, a group of Tibetan hunters hiking in a spot that had once been covered by a glacier found the remains of a large airplane.
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TRAVEL
By Alan Solomon and Alan Solomon,Chicago Tribune | June 18, 2000
Thamel is a small, congested, frenzied tangle of semi-paved alleyways in Katmandu, Nepal's capital. A reasonable walk from the temple-filled Durbar Square, Thamel is a commercial district of bars and neon and cheap hotels and power failures and dazed, scruffy First World pedestrians and, here and there, an amputee hustling rupees. You can't see the Himalayas from Thamel, not even on days when the air in the Katmandu Valley isn't full of dust and smoke and powdered dung from sacred cows, but they are a presence.
TRAVEL
By Chicago Tribune | July 6, 2008
Ganga: A Journey Down the Ganges River, Island Press, $25.95 Not since Eric Newby made his own way Slowly Down the Ganges (1966) has a writer made India's great river and its goddess the subject of such a riveting travelogue. While Newby loaded his river journey with irony and understatement, journalist and National Public Radio commentator Julian Crandall Hollick takes a more serious, but ultimately more wondrous, approach. As the Ganges sweeps down from its source in the high Himalayas and flows across India, it is worshiped, pillaged, poisoned, siphoned off and diverted, until, in Hollick's vivid phrase, it "staggers exhausted into the Bay of Bengal."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | August 7, 2007
Joseph Moye Eddins Sr., an Army Air Forces pilot who flew cargo missions over the Himalayas after World War II and later became a vice president of the Maryland Casualty Co., died Friday of heart failure at the Riderwood Erickson Retirement Community in Silver Spring. The former Towson resident was 83. Mr. Eddins was born and raised in Troy, Ala., and during his senior year of high school passed the exams for the Army Air Forces cadet-training program. After graduating from high school in 1943, he reported to Dos Palos, Calif.
TRAVEL
By KYLE WAGNER and KYLE WAGNER,THE DENVER POST | April 2, 2006
You can't say Disney doesn't listen. Guests have been complaining for years that Orlando's Animal Kingdom needed more rides, that the parks needed more roller coasters, and that Walt Disney's magic needs to be based more on the authentic vision that the man himself once embodied. The answer: Expedition Everest: Mission Himalayas. This new thrill ride, the first in this park since Primeval Whirl opened in 2002, is a 200-foot peak that takes riders for nearly a mile aboard a runaway train through the Himalayas, the habitat of the yeti, a mythical creature protecting the sacred mountains.
TRAVEL
By Chicago Tribune | July 6, 2008
Ganga: A Journey Down the Ganges River, Island Press, $25.95 Not since Eric Newby made his own way Slowly Down the Ganges (1966) has a writer made India's great river and its goddess the subject of such a riveting travelogue. While Newby loaded his river journey with irony and understatement, journalist and National Public Radio commentator Julian Crandall Hollick takes a more serious, but ultimately more wondrous, approach. As the Ganges sweeps down from its source in the high Himalayas and flows across India, it is worshiped, pillaged, poisoned, siphoned off and diverted, until, in Hollick's vivid phrase, it "staggers exhausted into the Bay of Bengal."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | November 4, 2004
James Zellick Ross, co-founder of a chocolate candy manufacturing business and a World War II pilot, died of complications from cancer Tuesday at Sinai Hospital. The Fallstaff resident was 86. Born Zellick Rosenblatt in St. Petersburg, Russia, he moved with his family to the United States in 1924 and was a 1936 graduate of City College. At the behest of his mother, a pianist who once played a concert for the Russian royal family at what is now the State Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg, he studied piano at the Peabody Conservatory and attended the Johns Hopkins University.
FEATURES
By Lisa Wiseman | September 11, 1994
Colonial convivialityThe wench is back. At the Maryland Inn in Annapolis, that is. She'll be setting the table on Sept. 21 for the return of the Publik Table, a rollicking and rowdy re-creation of a Colonial tavern. Merry men and women should forward to a feast of roast beast, fowl and vegetation, plus plenty of wine, mead and other spirits. Actress Kathleen Baker will entertain with songs from current stage shows. Said feast and entertainment will cost 25 American dollars, not including the governor's taxes and gratuities for the servants.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2010
Doris Stepanovich, a retired bereavement counselor and secretary who was the subject of news articles after the remains of her Army pilot husband were discovered in the Himalayas nearly 50 years after his death during World War II, died of heart failure Sept. 12 at Best Care Assisted Living in Reisterstown. She was 87 and lived in West Hills. In 1993, nearly 49 years after she had been told that her husband, Frank Ramos, was missing, a group of Tibetan hunters hiking in a spot that had once been covered by a glacier found the remains of a large airplane.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | August 7, 2007
Joseph Moye Eddins Sr., an Army Air Forces pilot who flew cargo missions over the Himalayas after World War II and later became a vice president of the Maryland Casualty Co., died Friday of heart failure at the Riderwood Erickson Retirement Community in Silver Spring. The former Towson resident was 83. Mr. Eddins was born and raised in Troy, Ala., and during his senior year of high school passed the exams for the Army Air Forces cadet-training program. After graduating from high school in 1943, he reported to Dos Palos, Calif.
TRAVEL
By KYLE WAGNER and KYLE WAGNER,THE DENVER POST | April 2, 2006
You can't say Disney doesn't listen. Guests have been complaining for years that Orlando's Animal Kingdom needed more rides, that the parks needed more roller coasters, and that Walt Disney's magic needs to be based more on the authentic vision that the man himself once embodied. The answer: Expedition Everest: Mission Himalayas. This new thrill ride, the first in this park since Primeval Whirl opened in 2002, is a 200-foot peak that takes riders for nearly a mile aboard a runaway train through the Himalayas, the habitat of the yeti, a mythical creature protecting the sacred mountains.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | November 4, 2004
James Zellick Ross, co-founder of a chocolate candy manufacturing business and a World War II pilot, died of complications from cancer Tuesday at Sinai Hospital. The Fallstaff resident was 86. Born Zellick Rosenblatt in St. Petersburg, Russia, he moved with his family to the United States in 1924 and was a 1936 graduate of City College. At the behest of his mother, a pianist who once played a concert for the Russian royal family at what is now the State Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg, he studied piano at the Peabody Conservatory and attended the Johns Hopkins University.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | October 7, 2001
Outdoors widows and widowers, if your spouse lamely tells you that he or she just couldn't call to say, "I'm running late," answer with two words: Chris Warner. See, Warner was out doing his outdoorsy thing on Sept. 24 and decided to check in with his wife -- from the 26,366-foot summit of Shishapangma, the 13th-highest mountain in the world. He used his walkie-talkie to call Base Camp, the camp cook called Warner's wife in Baltimore County on a satellite phone and then held the phone to the walkie-talkie so Warner could relay the usual tourist observations: weather, view, how he was feeling, when he might be home from the Himalayan hills.
TOPIC
By Laird B. Anderson | June 17, 2001
THE DREAM of a free press in the fragile 10-year-old constitutional monarchy of Nepal has received a severe blow with the detention of the editor and two top publishing executives from the nation's largest newspaper. The arrests on charges of sedition for publishing a politically sensitive commentary by a Maoist underground leader in the wake of the massacre of King Birendra, Queen Aishwarya and other royal family members has placed this Himalayan kingdom - once viewed as a steadily maturing democracy coming to grips with freedom - in a precarious position that could unravel its hopes and dreams.
TRAVEL
By Alan Solomon and Alan Solomon,Chicago Tribune | June 18, 2000
Thamel is a small, congested, frenzied tangle of semi-paved alleyways in Katmandu, Nepal's capital. A reasonable walk from the temple-filled Durbar Square, Thamel is a commercial district of bars and neon and cheap hotels and power failures and dazed, scruffy First World pedestrians and, here and there, an amputee hustling rupees. You can't see the Himalayas from Thamel, not even on days when the air in the Katmandu Valley isn't full of dust and smoke and powdered dung from sacred cows, but they are a presence.
NEWS
December 6, 1994
Communism is on the run all over the world. But high in the Himalayas of Nepal, it has staged a small comeback, democratically.The Communist Unified Marxist Leninist Party came in first in elections, though falling short of a parliamentary majority, and is trying to form a government. Communists have never ruled Nepal. Nepalese voters hardly know what they are, but elected them for what they are not. They are not the Congress Party, which won the elections of 1991 and ruled since then with rising corruption and unpopularity.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1999
To be a third-grader at Elkridge Elementary School is to know that you can get a sunburn on the roof of your mouth, that breathing at 25,000 feet sounds like a freight train and that burning yak droppings smell like grass.One hundred and fifty youngsters at the Howard County school are more worldly-wise because of a two-month educational exercise called "Shared Summits" that made them virtual climbers in the Himalayas.Chris Warner, owner of Earth Treks, a rock-climbing gym in Columbia, took the children with him via the Internet as he ascended Tibet's 26,750-foot Cho Oyu and attempted 22,584-foot Ama Dablam.
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