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NEWS
May 27, 2007
On May 22, 2007, NILES HILTON of Catonsville, MD. Beloved husband of the late Dorothy Rose Hilton, devoted companion of Bongsool Posinski. Family and friends are invited to call at STERLING-ASHTON-SCHWAB-WITZKE FUNERAL HOME OF CATONSVILLE, INC., 1630 Edmondson Ave., Catonsville, MD on Tuesday from 3-5 and 7-9 P.M. Mass of Christian Burial will be held at St. Mark Church, 27 Melvin Avenue, Catonsville, MD, on Wednesday at 10:00 A.M. Interment New Cathedral...
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SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
There's a pretty solid chance that the Ravens' scouting report on the Indianapolis Colts' offense includes a few bolded reminders about how dangerous wide receiver T.Y. Hilton can be as a deep threat. Hilton is one of the fastest wide receivers in the NFL, having run the 40-yard dash in 4.34 seconds. “We just can't let him take the top off the defense,” Ravens defensive coordinator Dean Pees said. Hilton emerged last season as a pivotal figure in the Colts' offense, catching a career-high 82 passes for 1,083 yards and six touchdowns.
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NEWS
June 28, 2013
Since it opened 21 years ago, I, like most locals, have grown enamored of Oriole Park at Camden Yards . It is a gem we are extremely proud of. My only complaint is that white elephant monstrosity, the financially beleaguered, city-funded Hilton Baltimore hotel, that lurks beyond left field ("Hilton again loses millions," June 27). In addition to being a visual migraine, the placement of the hotel absolutely destroys what used to be an aesthetically pleasing view in that direction.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
George W. Hilton, a retired college professor, author and transportation economist whose works on railroads and shipping included the seminal history of Maryland's Ma & Pa Railroad, died Aug. 4 of heart failure at Lorien Health Park in Columbia. He was 89. "George was a great historian for lost causes and great failures like narrow-gauge railroads and the Ma & Pa," said Herbert R. Harwood Jr., a retired CSX executive and a nationally known railroad historian and author. "That resulted in the definitive histories of the American narrow-gauge railroads, the electric interurban railway industry, cable-powered street railways, overnight steamships along the coasts and in the Great Lakes.
NEWS
November 4, 2013
A downtown convention center with a publicly-funded Hilton hotel is not a circumstance unique to Baltimore. Cleveland will have its own large-scale Hilton opening for business in 2016, it was announced last month. Why? Because without a convention center hotel, city leaders recognized Cleveland couldn't succeed in the highly competitive meetings industry. Sound familiar? Baltimore went through a similar decision-making process nearly a decade ago and came to an identical conclusion.
NEWS
March 5, 2013
A $54 million loss and still counting, but the city is still pouring public funds into its money-losing hotel ("City must help cover Hilton's debt payments," Feb. 28). Amid sequestration madness and a looming city financial crisis, haven't taxpayers had enough? Fiscal responsibility should dictate privatizing some city services that the private sector can manage more cost effectively. Roger Campos, Baltimore
NEWS
July 14, 2008
On July 10, 2008, LOUIS GOUGH HILTON beloved husband of the late Lavila Hilton (nee Martin); dear brother-in-law of Delorace Martin Hickey and her husband Joseph J. Hickey. A graveside service will be held on Monday at 1 P.M., in Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens. Arrangements by the family owned Ruck Towson Funeral Home Inc.
NEWS
January 28, 2004
On January 24, 2004, HILTON MABLE. Friends may call at the family owned MARCH FUNERAL HOME WEST, INC., 4300 Wabash Avenue, on Thursday after 8:30 A.M., where family will receive friends from 5 to 7 p.m. Family will also receive friends on Friday at Metropolitan United Methodist Church, 1122 W. Lanvale Street, at 10:30 a.m., followed by funeral services at 11 a.m. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the American Diabetes Association, 3120...
NEWS
March 8, 2005
On March 6, 2005, BILLY JOE "B.J.", owner of Hilton Cleaners; beloved husband of Eleanor M. (nee Stopford); devoted father of W. Gerald Hilton, Roselyn Blick, Christine Wade and Katherine Bogert. Also survived by nine grandchildren, four great-grandchildren, his sisters, Helena Hoffman and Marcella Saienni. Visiting at the Lassahn Funeral Home (Overlea), 7401 Belair Road, on Tuesday and Wednesday 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M. Funeral Services will be held at Overlea Chapel United Methodist Church, 3902 Overlea Avenue, on Thursday 10 A.M. Interment Parkwood Cemetery.
NEWS
April 25, 2004
On April 23, 2004 AUDREY ELAINE HILTON (nee Rowley) beloved wife of the late Robert Edward Hilton, devoted mother of Sandra H. Rabel, Patricia L. Gondeck and her husband Rudy Gondeck and Diane Haesloop and her husband Edward Haesloop, loving grandmother of Bundi L. Thompson, R. Matthew Haesloop, Audrey L. Gray and Jason E. Haesloop, loving great grandmother of Shane M. Gray, Robert C. Thompson Jr., and Shelby A. Gray. Friends may call on Monday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. at the Mac Nabb Funeral Home, 301 Frederick Rd., Catonsville (at Beltway Exit 13)
NEWS
June 15, 2014
The city-owned Hilton Hotel lost only $2.9 million dollars in 2013 ( "City-owned Hilton lost $2.9 million in 2013, audit says," June 11). And that's it's best performance. If it was in the private sector, the management would be discharged and the place closed. What's going on here? Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake thinks that it's progressing. Shows how much business acumen she has. F. Cordell - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
BUSINESS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
The city-owned Hilton Baltimore convention center hotel lost $2.9 million last year — the best performance in the taxpayer-financed project's history. City officials pointed to the hotel's performance as a sign of progress Wednesday, noting revenues there increased by nearly $9 million from 2012. "We're making progress. We're doing better than we've done before," said Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake after the release of the hotel's annual audit. "To me, that's a good sign. " Last year, city officials said they had ruled out selling the money-losing project and hoped to turn a profit within a decade.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2014
The city-owned Hilton Baltimore spent nearly all of the $2.8 million it generated in hotel occupancy taxes — money the city gave it last year to help the struggling convention center hotel make its debt payments, officials said. The hotel did return $72,000 of the tax money to city coffers. Baltimore City Finance Director Harry E. Black called it a turning point for the hotel, which at one point last year looked as if it might need even more help. The West Pratt Street hotel has lost more than $50 million since opening in 2008 as it struggled to make payments on the $301 million in tax-exempt municipal bonds issued to finance its construction.
TRAVEL
December 9, 2013
(Reuters) - Hilton Worldwide Inc said its initial public offering would raise up to $2.37 billion in the biggest-ever hotel IPO, more than doubling Blackstone Group LP's investment. According to reports last week, Hilton is expected to launch its initial public offering this month and the sale of about 11.5 percent of its shares would value the company at up to $32.5 billion, including debt. Blackstone took Hilton private in 2007 for $26.7 billion, including debt, in one of the largest leveraged buyouts before the 2008 global financial crisis.
NEWS
November 4, 2013
A downtown convention center with a publicly-funded Hilton hotel is not a circumstance unique to Baltimore. Cleveland will have its own large-scale Hilton opening for business in 2016, it was announced last month. Why? Because without a convention center hotel, city leaders recognized Cleveland couldn't succeed in the highly competitive meetings industry. Sound familiar? Baltimore went through a similar decision-making process nearly a decade ago and came to an identical conclusion.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2013
City officials said Thursday that they've ruled out selling the money-losing Hilton Baltimore convention center hotel, but hope to turn a profit on the $300 million project within a decade. The city could lose $60 million to $90 million if it sold the hotel now, officials said. "We would do it at a very significant financial loss to the city," finance director Harry E. Black said of a potential sale. "We don't believe we're at that point yet. We believe the situation is manageable.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2013
Edward Clark - known as "Pops" to Baltimore softball enthusiasts - could often be found along the sidelines watching a game from his red folding chair. Nearly anyone who played in adult leagues saw the 81-year-old on the fields this summer, as they have for years. But on Wednesday players were mourning the city sporting patriarch, who died after his Northwest Baltimore home burned. Officials said late Wednesday that Clark died of smoke inhalation. His death is the 14th confirmed fire death this year - up from last year's all-time low of 12. "He was more than just a city employee.
NEWS
July 5, 2013
The proposal offered by letter writer Steve English to tear down the Baltimore Hilton has to be the dumbest idea going ("Orioles fans can finance Hilton tear-down," July 2). I am an Orioles fan and don't care about the view of the skyline at Camden Yards. Steve, do you go to the game to look at the skyline or watch the game? I watch the game. Others can go sit on Federal Hill and look at the skyline and save money on Orioles tickets. Why should we contribute to tearing down Gov. Martin O'Malley's white elephant that should not have been built to begin with?
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