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By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 27, 1998
FRIDAY MORNING, I looked out the window and saw frost on the roof. Wouldn't you know it? A frost comes just after we put in the chrysanthemums.The temperature wasn't cold enough to kill the flowers next to the house, so we can enjoy their rich color a little longer. Later in the day, I was happy to see that another planting of chrysanthemums had survived.At Route 424 and U.S. 50 sits the Doepkens Farm. For the past four years, Bill Doepkens has created a chrysanthemum portrait on the hillside next to his farmhouse.
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NEWS
November 20, 2013
Tens of thousands of kids have run races on Hereford High School's cross country course, one of the most well-known in the Mid-Atlantic region and one on which many are proud to say that they have competed there. Unfortunately, the course it being ruined by the renovations with little or no thought to preserving it. With big meets, like the Bull Run or the state championships, large starting areas are needed for the large fields of runners. Now on the hillside where the runners come through at the start, there is a large gradually sloping road with 10-12 feet of fill dirt blocking the way. This has been done to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act access requirements for the baseball field.
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NEWS
By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 10, 2000
EACH YEAR WE watch the eastern hillside of the Doepkens Farm on Davidsonville Road to discover what beautiful floral display Billy Doepkens has planted. Over the winter, Doepkens plans an arrangement of chrysanthemum flowers to form a picture. On Memorial Day weekend, he plants the mums. Then, all summer long, a shape slowly emerges from the patch of land. In September, the colors fill in, bit by bit, as different varieties burst into bloom. Area commuters and children spend weeks guessing what the year's design will be. Once, it was a butterfly.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2011
The Alcarese home, built into a hillside in Baldwin, could not appear more like an Italian villa if it was built overlooking a valley in Tuscany. The only thing missing from the vista surrounding the home are tall, lanky cypress trees of the scenic wine-growing region. From the road, the home's one-story elevation, built of brick along with board and batten siding, is nestled in lush, almost wild, landscaping. The full breadth of its construction is better seen from the rear of the structure, where the driveway abuts a flower-covered pergola that shades the brick path leading to the side entrance.
BUSINESS
November 12, 1990
Last week's MBW cover story on failed developer Martin Kandel incorrectly credited him for launching the Hillside at Seminary residential project in Baltimore County.In fact, Mr. Kandel's company built 10 homes on land purchased from a partnership that developed the Hillside at Seminary's homesites. The development has a total of 84 homesites.
NEWS
March 26, 1992
A 47-year-old farmer was killed when the tractor he was riding rolled over on him while he was clearing brush from a hillside behind his house, state police at Westminster have reported.Robert Lee Dell, of the 4800 block of Baughman Mills Road in Lineboro, was clearing a hillside of brush and debris about 9 a.m. yesterday when the tractor flipped, trapping him underneath the rear wheels, police said.Police said a female occupant of the victim's house discovered the accident and called the Carroll County emergency operations center.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris | February 25, 2007
Carroll County firefighters rescued two hikers stuck on an ice-covered hillside in the McKeldin Area of Patapsco Valley State Park yesterday, said Sgt. Bill Rehkopf of the Sykesville Freedom District Fire Department. The two men in their mid-40s had been hiking on a trail that runs along the river. As they encountered icy conditions, the men worried that they would slip on the sloped ice and fall into the river, Rehkopf said. The men climbed up the steep hillside to the parking lot by grabbing onto trees.
NEWS
By Polly Thornton | July 7, 1995
I love twilight when breezes are stilled and the plaintiff call of the whip-poor-will can be heard echoing from the daisy-covered hillside and banjo frogs bellow their croaky courting calls while hummingbirds hover over salmon colored geraniums and sip the nectar from the porch-side feeders, the red-throated male at one and the plain female at the other and I feel my mother looking...
NEWS
November 20, 2013
Tens of thousands of kids have run races on Hereford High School's cross country course, one of the most well-known in the Mid-Atlantic region and one on which many are proud to say that they have competed there. Unfortunately, the course it being ruined by the renovations with little or no thought to preserving it. With big meets, like the Bull Run or the state championships, large starting areas are needed for the large fields of runners. Now on the hillside where the runners come through at the start, there is a large gradually sloping road with 10-12 feet of fill dirt blocking the way. This has been done to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act access requirements for the baseball field.
NEWS
By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 8, 2002
ONE OF AUTUMN'S most beautiful traditions is unfolding on a peaceful hillside in Davidsonville. For eight years, Bill Doepkens has planted a flower mural on the sloping field next to his family's farmhouse. Commuters, children on school buses and people from around the area pass the field every day, watch the chrysanthemums fill the design, and try to identify this year's picture. The Doepkens farm, at Route 424 and U.S. 50, has been an important part of local agriculture since Maryland's Colonial days, when the land was part of the Middle Plantation.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker | andrea.walker@baltsun.com | April 4, 2010
An Under Armour logo painted on the hillside of Federal Hill Park is being removed just days after riling some residents, who found it to be a tacky, and possibly illegal, form of free advertising. On Sunday afternoon, the logo was covered up with a dark square and was expected to be completely removed Monday, said spokeswoman Diane Pelkey. The Baltimore-based sports apparel company will then plant grass seed on the spot. The logo, with company motto "Protect This House" stenciled underneath, was put up to welcome players in town for the Northeast Qualifier of the East Coast Volleyball tournament at the Baltimore Convention Center, Pelkey said.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris | February 25, 2007
Carroll County firefighters rescued two hikers stuck on an ice-covered hillside in the McKeldin Area of Patapsco Valley State Park yesterday, said Sgt. Bill Rehkopf of the Sykesville Freedom District Fire Department. The two men in their mid-40s had been hiking on a trail that runs along the river. As they encountered icy conditions, the men worried that they would slip on the sloped ice and fall into the river, Rehkopf said. The men climbed up the steep hillside to the parking lot by grabbing onto trees.
NEWS
By G. JEFFERSON PRICE III | February 7, 2006
ROZALANG, AFGHANISTAN -- It doesn't take much to make a difference in this primitive village: a sewing machine, a carpet loom, some seeds, a little fertilizer, improvement of a narrow donkey path so a vehicle can travel on it. In Rozalang, nestled on a hillside in the foothills of the Sefid Kuh mountain range, where the snow-capped mountains loom over the river valleys like impregnable walls, they can make the difference between survival and failure....
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2005
TERRA ALTA, W.Va. - It's an odd place for a business district, this quarter-mile stretch of gravel road on a rolling, 700-acre farm in the mountains of West Virginia. But tent after tent adorned with handmade signs - "Sunshine Octopus Creations," "Knot Just Hemp," "Grateful Dan Imports" - and the men, women and kids poring over their wares testify to the lure and staying power of a man none of them ever met but that all feel they knew like a brother. It hardly seems like a decade since Jerry Garcia, good-time maestro and founding member of the Grateful Dead, died of a heart attack at age 53. The 3,000 or so fellow travelers here for the 20th Annual Jerry Garcia Birthday Bash are mourning Jerry the way Deadheads celebrated his music for 30-plus years - gathering to soak up tunes, trade tapes and stories, and thrill to the feeling that there's a life to be lived on the margins of "straight" society.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | September 25, 2004
The last five races Bug River ran for Richard W. "Dickie" Small, the veteran trainer at Pimlico Race, were forgettable. Bug River finished no better than seventh. That was back in 1996 and 1997. Four years later, Bug River found a second career as a steeplechaser. His 10 races over jumps have been memorable. He has performed in the extreme, either not finishing the race (five times) or finishing first or second (five times). Today, at Shawan Downs in Hunt Valley, 11-year-old Bug River provides a focus for the expected crowd of 12,000 race-goers and partygoers.
NEWS
By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 8, 2002
ONE OF AUTUMN'S most beautiful traditions is unfolding on a peaceful hillside in Davidsonville. For eight years, Bill Doepkens has planted a flower mural on the sloping field next to his family's farmhouse. Commuters, children on school buses and people from around the area pass the field every day, watch the chrysanthemums fill the design, and try to identify this year's picture. The Doepkens farm, at Route 424 and U.S. 50, has been an important part of local agriculture since Maryland's Colonial days, when the land was part of the Middle Plantation.
NEWS
By Martin C. Evans and Martin C. Evans,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 27, 1991
OAKLAND, Calif. -- For months, James R. Tuckner had cast his eyes westward, over the San Francisco Bay, hoping that the next day or the next would bring rain to his dry, mountaintop neighborhood in Oakland."
NEWS
By G. JEFFERSON PRICE III | February 7, 2006
ROZALANG, AFGHANISTAN -- It doesn't take much to make a difference in this primitive village: a sewing machine, a carpet loom, some seeds, a little fertilizer, improvement of a narrow donkey path so a vehicle can travel on it. In Rozalang, nestled on a hillside in the foothills of the Sefid Kuh mountain range, where the snow-capped mountains loom over the river valleys like impregnable walls, they can make the difference between survival and failure....
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | December 16, 2001
QUETTA, Pakistan - On the rocky brown hill known as the Shining Mountain of the Quran, a new shipment has arrived. About 200 sacks are piled high in the bright morning sunlight, and each contains about 60 worn-out copies of Islam's holiest book. They were delivered by truck from all corners of Pakistan. Some of the Qurans will be repaired and returned to the mosques and religious schools that sent them. But most will remain here, destined for burial in one of the 30 room-sized caves or the 1,600 feet of narrow tunnels carved into the rock.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | May 30, 2001
After 11 years of hopes and hard work, Howard County has issued a building permit for restoration of the Ellicott City Colored School -- the county's most prominent reminder of its segregated past. As contractors for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers work to shore up the stream-eroded hillside on which the 19th-century wooden schoolhouse sits, advocates for the project are exulting that work on the building itself may begin by summer's end. The old building is in delicate shape -- so tattered that the county spent $40,000 in 1998 to keep it from collapsing.
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