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Hillary Rodham Clinton

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By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 3, 1998
(With apologies to the late Theodor Seuss Geisel)Hillary Clinton wants you to read.For kids, she said, it's a vital need.At the Learning Ideas store out in P.G.she would read to tots ages 4 and 3.(She also got heaps of publicity.When she arrives, so does TV.)On the 94th B-day of Dr. Seuss,She put the spotlight to good use.And so she told the assembled crowdThey need to read - and to read aloud.With hands to be held and books to be read,Thoughts of subpoenas turned tail and fled.Some 50 adults were also there.
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NEWS
August 16, 2009
KENNETH BACON, 64 Noted Pentagon spokesman Kenneth Bacon, a Pentagon spokesman in the Clinton administration who became a voice for millions of refugees uprooted by violence and conflict, died Saturday of skin cancer that had spread to his brain. He was 64. His death at his vacation home in Block Island, R.I., was announced by Refugees International, a Washington-based advocacy group that Bacon had led since 2001. "Most Americans remember Ken as the unflappable civilian voice of the Department of Defense," Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said in a statement.
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FEATURES
October 26, 2007
61 Pat Sajak TV host 60 Hillary Rodham Clinton Senator 55 James Pickens Jr. Actor 40 Keith Urban Country singer 23 Sasha Cohen Figure skater
NEWS
By Faye Fiore and Faye Fiore,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 23, 2008
SCRANTON, Pa. -- After six weeks of testy campaigning by Hillary Rodham Clinton and Barack Obama for the affections of this working-class city that has seen better days, voters streamed to the polls yesterday. And if people such as Simon Lipchus were any indication, the television ads, interminable robocalls, bad bowling and whiskey sipping didn't make a whole lot of difference. Lipchus, the 64-year-old proprietor of Simon's Restaurant on Market Street, a little place with a screen door and great omelettes, knew more than a year ago that he would vote for Clinton.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | March 8, 1994
Fish are vanishing from the oceans. Mammals that walk upright on land cannot be far behind.Everyone wants to put Hillary Rodham Clinton in her place. Whether that is in Arkansas, jail or the Oval Office, no one can agree.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | April 21, 1994
Hillary Rodham Clinton is good. She can be on Kweisi Mfume's talk show any time.Anyone who thinks the Serbs are appeased with Gorazde, there's a bridge over the Drina for sale.The Serbs know what they want, which is more than anyone can say for the "world community."
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | March 23, 1993
Bill could appoint himself to the Supreme Court. President Gore would pick Hillary Rodham Clinton for Veep.Russians are confused whether democracy is where the parliament cuts down the president or vice versa.France is giving Russia an object lesson that just because a president is despised and humiliated he is no less president.Don't look now but those uproarious Russians haven't ratified the nuclear dismantlement treaties yet.
NEWS
May 22, 1993
First lady Hillary Rodham Clinton is bringing her health care reform debate to Balti- more today. Mrs. Clinton is scheduled to have a discussion on health care while having lunch in the historic neigh- borhood of Fells Point. Small business owners can exchange ideas with her, including whether any new plan would require them to offer health insurance to all workers and how much that might cost.
NEWS
July 26, 2004
On television ABC, CBS and NBC: 10 p.m. to 11 p.m. PBS: 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. C-SPAN: 4 p.m. to 11 p.m. Speakers include: Former President Bill Clinton, Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton of New York, and Rep. Steny H. Hoyer and Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski of Maryland More inside Coverage: With scant news expected, major networks scale back. Page 1D
SPORTS
April 5, 1994
Celebrities who threw out the ceremonial first pitches in National League games on Opening Day:Site .. .. .. .. .. .. ..CelebrityCin. .. .. .. .. ..NL Pres. Leonard ColemanChi. .. .. .. .. ....Hillary Rodham ClintonColo. .. .. .. .. .Darrell "Mike" Preston-aHou. .. ... .. .. .. .. ..Evander HolyfieldS.D. .. .. .. .. ..Anisha & Tony Gwynn II-bS.F. .. .. .. .. .. Stony and Thad Feeney-aa-season-ticket holderb-children of Tony Gwynnc-children of the late Chub Feeney
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,Sun Reporter | February 10, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Should the next president sit down with the leaders of Iran, or North Korea, just to chat? Around that question revolves one of the few national security disagreements between Sens. Hillary Rodham Clinton and Barack Obama as they struggle to define themselves in advance of Tuesday's Democratic primaries in Maryland and elsewhere. On other issues - the war in Iraq, nuclear proliferation, defense spending - it's difficult to see much daylight between the two. Both say they would, as president, accelerate the troop withdrawals from Iraq.
NEWS
February 3, 2008
2008 will be remembered as a landmark year in American politics and a surprisingly interesting one for Maryland voters. Neither of the Democratic contenders is expected to lock up a nomination in Tuesday's super primary, and that makes Maryland's Feb. 12 contest relevant for the first time in a long time. National opinion polls show Hillary Rodham Clinton leading Barack Obama, but he's gained momentum since his victory in South Carolina. More important, many Democratic primaries award delegates based on share of the vote rather than winner-take-all.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun reporter | February 1, 2008
LOS ANGELES -- Hillary Rodham Clinton and Barack Obama went head-to-head last night for the first time in a serious-minded debate but studiously steered clear of personal attacks. For more than 90 minutes, the finalists in the Democratic presidential contest unleashed their inner policy wonk as they argued dispassionately over their differences on health care coverage, the subprime mortgage crisis, immigration, going to war in Iraq and the pace of a U.S. withdrawal. Clinton was pressed by moderator Wolf Blitzer of CNN on whether she was wrong to have voted to authorize the use of military force against Iraq in 2002, prompting a prolonged response that she had made a "reasoned judgment" and did not consider her position a vote to go to war. Obama responded by turning her answer against the main argument of her candidacy, that she has superior experience and qualifications for the job of commander in chief.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | February 1, 2008
At a briefing for conservative journalists before the State of the Union address, White House Chief of Staff Joshua B. Bolten said President Bush isn't wistful about the close of his presidency and doesn't foresee a day when he will pine to be back in the Oval Office. Chuckles broke out in the room at the perhaps unintentional comparison to Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton's surrogate in chief, who - as with everything else in his life - has decided to make this election year all about him. This got me thinking.
NEWS
By Peter Nicholas and Peter Nicholas,LOS ANGELES | January 25, 2008
COLUMBIA, S.C. -- He's scrapping with reporters. Pushing his wife's candidacy. Lashing out at her top rival in the Democratic presidential race. Former President Bill Clinton's recent aggressive tactics in the 2008 campaign have propelled him squarely to center stage - to the dismay of some prominent Democrats who fear he might be damaging the party's prospects for November. The vocal role he is carving out also might be a preview, should Hillary Rodham Clinton win in the fall, of how the White House would operate under the unprecedented scenario of a president being married to an ex-president.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun reporter | January 21, 2008
WEST COLUMBIA, S.C. -- When Hillary Rodham Clinton started running for president, Wanjulia Ezekiel was thrilled. "I was looking forward to the advancement of a female," she said. But Sen. Barack Obama is getting her vote in this week's Democratic presidential primary in South Carolina. "He speaks to the possibility that I dreamed about as a child," explained the 40-year- old civil engineer from Columbia, the state capital. With Democrats on track to select either the party's first female or black presidential nominee, polls have suggested that black women such as Ezekiel are torn by conflicting loyalties to race and gender.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | February 3, 1993
Because it is unconscionable to leave 400 Palestinian deportees to freeze in no-man's land, the U.S. forced Israel to take one-fourth of them back.Hillary Rodham Clinton does not care what people do in the privacy of their own homes as long as they don't smoke in the White House.Don't tell the Joint Chiefs of Staff but more people watched Michael Jackson's non-macho Super Bowl halftime show than watched the game.Cheer up. Pat Buchanan is back on the box.
NEWS
March 8, 1998
"Time spent shared with a favorite book with a child, even a newborn, not only strengthens the bond between a parent and child; it literally does help the baby's brain to grow. Few things can make a more dramatic difference in the first 10 years to help prepare young children, to give every child the head start we want for them."First lady Hillary Rodham Clinton in Prince George's County on Monday to celebrate reading as part of series of events across the nation in honor of the 94th anniversary of the birth of Theodor Seuss Geisel, also known as Dr. Seuss:Pub Date: 3/08/98
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | January 18, 2008
BOSTON -- Maybe I forgot to get my vaccination against the false-hope flu. Maybe the "change" mantra has finally overwhelmed my immune system. Or maybe it's just the spirit of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. hovering over this week. But I have a dream. Or at least a dream ticket. Why not the two front-runners on one ballot? Yes, I am aware that I must immediately hand over my press card to the professional cynic police. But the Democrats have just recovered from a panic attack over the possibility that a primary fight between Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton and Sen. Barack Obama over race and gender will leave both in the dirt.
NEWS
By Mary Sanchez | January 15, 2008
The promise of "change" as an emerging catchphrase for the presidential campaign poses an interesting dilemma for Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton. For this voter, Mrs. Clinton's career as an adjunct to her husband doesn't inspire confidence that she would offer much different from the last round of Clintonism - no matter how hard she tries to get on the change bandwagon. Recall the phrase "two for the price of one" from 1992? It still applies. The affairs of Bill - Gennifer, Paula and, of course, Monica - are old news and need no rehashing.
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