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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
Hilary Hahn has canceled her scheduled season-opening performance of Beethoven's Violin Concerto with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and music director Marin Alsop this weekend due to muscle strain. In mid-July, Hahn announced that she would cancel all engagements for six weeks due to an inflamed muscle. Her recovery is taking longer than expected; she is now set to resume concertizing in October. Playing the Beethoven concerto in Hahn's stead will be Pinchas Zukerman, his first BSO engagement in 14 years.
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By Hilary Hahn and Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
When we talk about music, we tend to place our experiences into one of two categories: making the music and listening to it. Delineating the two seems practical and obvious. In reality, though, there are a lot of opportunities for overlap, and it doesn't matter how you get into the music as long as you connect with it. Here are some approaches to try. Immerse I love performing. The sounds coming at me are dynamic, colorful and multi-layered. The energy from the musicians around me and from the audience is a swirl of excitement.
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By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Sun Staff Writer | October 9, 1994
Baltimore violinist Hilary Hahn will make her New York orchestral debut this week in four solo appearances with the New York Philharmonic.The 14-year-old musician, a student at the prestigious Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia, has been performing with professional orchestras since she was 11. She performed earlier this year with the Cleveland Orchestra and the Pittsburgh Symphony. (She made her debut with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra in 1991.)Under the direction of guest conductor Paavo Berglund, Hilary will perform Bruch's Violin Concerto No. 1 in concerts scheduled Oct. 13-15 and Oct. 18 in Avery Fisher Hall at Lincoln Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
Hilary Hahn has canceled her scheduled season-opening performance of Beethoven's Violin Concerto with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and music director Marin Alsop this weekend due to muscle strain. In mid-July, Hahn announced that she would cancel all engagements for six weeks due to an inflamed muscle. Her recovery is taking longer than expected; she is now set to resume concertizing in October. Playing the Beethoven concerto in Hahn's stead will be Pinchas Zukerman, his first BSO engagement in 14 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | August 25, 2002
Local favorite Hilary Hahn is back in the area. The remarkably gifted violinist is the featured attraction in the Annapolis Symphony Orches-tra's "Gala Season Opener" this week. The Baltimore-raised Hahn, named "America's Best Young Classical Musician" by Time last year, will focus on Bach for this event. In addition to performing his E major Violin Concerto, she will collaborate with Margaret Batjer, concertmaster of the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, in the D minor Concerto for Two Violins (the sublime slow movement of that piece is tailor-made for the natural lyricism of Hahn's playing)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | June 4, 2009
A comment posted by a viewer on one of violinist Hilary Hahn's many YouTube videos sums up her appeal neatly: "You're just too cool, Hilary :)" The stellar 29-year-old fiddler, still based in Baltimore, where she grew up and started her musical training, has her own YouTube channel. It features informal Q&A sessions with viewers and disarming clips Hahn films in her dressing room or other spots when she's on the road. "I meet these neat people, and doing interviews is a way I get to know them," Hahn says from Vienna, Austria.
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By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 14, 1998
This review appeared in later editions of yesterday's Today section.Baltimore's own Hilary Hahn plays with the zest appropriate to her age (18) and the lyricism of a much more seasoned player. The piece she is performing this weekend with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, Leonard Bernstein's "Serenade" for violin, string orchestra, harp and percussion, is the one she'll record with the BSO for her first CD with a orchestra.Though not the expected work for a young violinist's debut, it's a charming choice: American, like its player, and unburdened with the interpretations of older violin masters.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2011
Globetrotting, Grammy-winning violinist Hilary Hahn will breeze through the region this weekend to play a recital. Her appearance at the Music Center at Strathmore with brilliant pianist Valentina Lisitsa, presented by the Washington Performing Arts Society, is the closest Hahn will be this season to her old stamping ground. The violinist was raised in Baltimore from the age of 3, started her musical studies at the Peabody Institute, and made her orchestral debut with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra in 1991.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 29, 2000
According to the rules, young musicians aren't supposed to have artistic wisdom. For example, pre-teens presumably can't relate to musical romanticism since, unless very poorly supervised, they have no romantic experiences to draw upon. The same theory holds that a teen-ager, however advanced, can't plumb the profound depths of, say, the late Beethoven compositions. As for someone who's only 20, the expressive heat of a piece like the D major Violin Concerto by Brahms is simply beyond reach.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Sun Staff | February 20, 2000
ST. LOUIS -- Hilary Hahn stands on the stage of the ornately gilded concert hall wearing clunky high-heeled loafers, black bell-bottom pants and a dark tank top. Her glorious waves of copper-colored hair pinned back, her antique violin in hand, she gazes fondly at her fellow musicians as if this rehearsal were actually a Welcome Home party. It could be -- especially when the honored guest is Beethoven. This morning the young soloist and the members of the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra are rehearsing one of the most famous violin concertos in the repertoire: Beethoven's Concerto for Violin and Orchestra in D Major.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2013
The Philadelphia Orchestra has had its share of troubles over the years, including an embarrassing brush with bankruptcy, but things sure sound like they are looking up, way up, these days. Financial matters now seem more stable, and the hiring of a young dynamo from Montreal, Yannick Nezet-Seguin, as music director (this is his inaugural season) has sent a decidedly positive jolt into the organization. That electricity could be easily felt Wednesday night when the Philadelphians visited the Kennedy Center for a concert presented by the Washington Performing Arts Society . I'm still feeling a little tingly from the exposure.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | November 8, 2012
When violinist Benjamin Beilman performs for the Candlelight Concert Society on Saturday, Nov. 10, at 8 p.m. at Howard Community College's Smith Theatre, he'll surely be one of the younger people in the house. That's because this 22-year-old Curtis Institute graduate is off to a precocious start with his professional career. Helping give him a boost are the performance prizes he has received from the Buffalo Chamber Music Society, Friends of Music Concerts in New York and Howard County's own Candlelight Concert Society.
NEWS
September 15, 2011
Baltimoreans have had much to be proud of since the beginning of September. The most ennobling, of course, were the Sept. 11 commemorations honoring the fallen victims of that infamous attack and their families. There was the Grand Prix, and then we had the Ravens victory over the Steelers. Less heralded publicly, but of impressive impact and long-lasting effect, was the spectacular performance of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra on Saturday evening, Sept. 10. It was a one-two punch.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2011
Globetrotting, Grammy-winning violinist Hilary Hahn will breeze through the region this weekend to play a recital. Her appearance at the Music Center at Strathmore with brilliant pianist Valentina Lisitsa, presented by the Washington Performing Arts Society, is the closest Hahn will be this season to her old stamping ground. The violinist was raised in Baltimore from the age of 3, started her musical studies at the Peabody Institute, and made her orchestral debut with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra in 1991.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | June 4, 2009
A comment posted by a viewer on one of violinist Hilary Hahn's many YouTube videos sums up her appeal neatly: "You're just too cool, Hilary :)" The stellar 29-year-old fiddler, still based in Baltimore, where she grew up and started her musical training, has her own YouTube channel. It features informal Q&A sessions with viewers and disarming clips Hahn films in her dressing room or other spots when she's on the road. "I meet these neat people, and doing interviews is a way I get to know them," Hahn says from Vienna, Austria.
NEWS
By Tim Swift | May 31, 2009
TV 'The Tonight Show: with Conan O'Brien': Heeere's Conan! The offbeat host is back on the air at a new time and on a new coast. NBC might have a glut of late shows, but this is the one to watch. (The others, not so much.) Tune in for guests Will Ferrell and Pearl Jam at 11:35 p.m. Monday on WBAL, Channel 11. FILM Dudefest: A modest hit when it came out in the '90s, The Big Lebowski is now a cult classic. So the Creative Alliance is paying homage, rolling out bathrobes and bowling to celebrate all things Dude.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 4, 1998
Because Hilary Hahn is only 18 and because she is about to play the most beautiful and musically profound work in the violin-and-orchestra repertory, the first question seems inevitable.Is it intimidating to perform Beethoven's Violin Concerto in D?"Always exciting, but not really scary," says the Baltimore-bred teen-ager, whose tumbling, golden brown ringlets, ivory skin and soul-penetrating eyes make her resemble a taller, prettier Sarah Jessica Parker."I learned it [the Beethoven] when I was 14, I made my German debut with it when I was 15 and I've played it a lot since," says Hahn, who performs the Beethoven with David Zinman and the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra tomorrow, Saturday and Sunday in Meyerhoff Hall.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 6, 2000
When word got around that the Candlelight Concert Society would be presenting a performance by the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center featuring violinist Hilary Hahn, the recital in Columbia suddenly became one of the hottest tickets in town. Not only was the Howard Community College's Smith Theatre filled to capacity, but there were many more who wanted in and simply couldn't obtain tickets. It wasn't just that the Baltimore-born virtuoso was riding high in the wake of her recent Grammy nomination.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 16, 2003
Hilary Hahn Mendelssohn: Violin Concerto; Shostakovich: Violin Concerto No. 1. Hilary Hahn, violinist; Oslo Philharmonic Orchestra; Hugh Wolff and Marek Janowski, conductors. (Sony Classical SK 89921) ; Poor
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | August 25, 2002
Local favorite Hilary Hahn is back in the area. The remarkably gifted violinist is the featured attraction in the Annapolis Symphony Orches-tra's "Gala Season Opener" this week. The Baltimore-raised Hahn, named "America's Best Young Classical Musician" by Time last year, will focus on Bach for this event. In addition to performing his E major Violin Concerto, she will collaborate with Margaret Batjer, concertmaster of the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, in the D minor Concerto for Two Violins (the sublime slow movement of that piece is tailor-made for the natural lyricism of Hahn's playing)
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