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NEWS
September 25, 2011
I rejoice with the friends and families of Shane Bauer and Joshua Fattal as their ordeal ended in Evin Prison in Iran. As Mr. Bauer said at the Oman Airport, "Two years is too long in a prison. We sincerely hope for the freedom of other political prisoners and other unjustly imprisoned people in America and in Iran. " This reminded me of the plight of Ahmadi Muslims, hundreds of whom are behind bars under Pakistan's Anti-Ahmadiyya Ordinance XX issued in 1984. It imposes three years imprisonment for simple acts like calling places of worship mosques, performing the Muslim call to prayer, using the traditional Islamic greeting in public, or even publishing religious materials.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
Johns Hopkins University will host a former North Korean detainee, the hiker whose accident was adapted into the movie "127 Hours," and actors from "Breaking Bad" and "The Office," among several other speakers this fall. The university's annual Milton S. Eisenhower Symposium will feature journalist Laura Ling, who was detained in North Korea in 2009; former National Security Adviser Thomas Donilon; hiker Aron Ralston; RJ Mitte, who played Flynn on "Breaking Bad"; and B.J. Novak, who played Ryan on "The Office.
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NEWS
October 15, 2012
Two Virginia veterinarians reported missing while hiking in Glacier National Park were found alive Monday, elated family members and park officials said. "Initial information indicates they are well and will be returning to their families! Yeah!" announced a post on the park's Facebook page, referring to Jason Hiser of Richmond, Va., and Neal Peckens of Herndon, Va. The two had been reported missing by their families Friday after failing to catch a flight home. Rescue teams located the men after as many as 50 people laboring in wintry conditions scoured back country near Two Medicine, Mont., for days by air, on foot and on horseback, aided by a dog team.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
BOONSBORO -- In three months on the Appalachian Trail, Jim Parkins has met a federal judge, a doctor, countless Boy Scouts, marijuana-smoking college graduates, and a married couple who celebrate their anniversary each year by feeding hikers for a week. "People who would never talk to each other in the world get along great," said Parkins, a 53-year-old resident of Derby, Conn., as he rested his legs and smoked a cigarette near Annapolis Rock, a popular landmark with a spectacular view of the Cumberland Valley.
SPORTS
March 28, 2010
G - From the first tiny mention in Backpacker magazine about a decade ago, Larry Luxenberg's dream of creating a museum to spotlight the Appalachian Trail and its hikers has had as many ups and downs as the 2,178-mile footpath itself. Buildings were too expensive, too decrepit or too remote. Support from public officials, elusive in the best of times, came and went with the economy and elections. Still, Luxenberg soldiered on, putting one foot in front of the other, just as he did in 1980, when he completed his Georgia-to-Maine hike.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2010
GREENBELT — NASA unveiled a new satellite-based system on Monday that space agency officials say should reduce the time needed to locate lost boaters and hikers to just seconds. "Our mission is to take the "search" out of search-and-rescue technology," said Dave Affens, the search and rescue mission manager at NASA, an agency sometimes criticized for not focusing enough on Earth-bound problems. "Our ultimate goal here is to save lives," Affens said. Designed and developed at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, DASS — the Distress Alerting Satellite System — will be able to locate emergency beacons carried by aircraft, boats and hikers almost instantaneously, officials said.
NEWS
By Alan Wechsler and Alan Wechsler,ALBANY TIMES UNION | September 30, 2002
KEENE, N.Y. - Five years ago, the Adirondack Mountains were the site of a different kind of peace conference: Canadian hiking group leaders met with American land managers. Things haven't been quite the same since. At the time, some felt Canadian hikers were getting a bad name. There had been three recent Canadian hiker or climber deaths here. Land managers were frustrated by Canadians arriving by charter buses, dropping off large hiking groups that invaded the trails and swarmed the summits of the 192,685-acre High Peaks Wilderness Area.
FEATURES
By Abigail Tucker and Abigail Tucker,Sun Reporter | June 22, 2007
Along the Appalachian Trail -- Dave Odorisio unzipped his tent flap yesterday, peered out and stretched; a halo of gnats quickly formed around his tousled head. It was just another morning on Maryland's leg of the Appalachian Trail. But this particular morning, the 25-year-old hiker had an important decision to make: Namely, would he get dressed today? Hike Naked Day marks the summer solstice on the 2,000-plus mile trail and gives the boldest adventurers a chance to walk -- not to mention scale boulders and gain summits -- on the wild side.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Sun Staff Correspondent | May 25, 1991
NEW BLOOMFIELD, Pa. -- A jury yesterday convicted Paul David Crews, a sullen drifter on the run from Florida police, of murdering two young teachers as they camped on the Appalachian Trail.The jurors will be asked today to decide if Crews, 38, should be sentenced to death or to life imprisonment without parole.The murder of the couple last September at a trailside shelter had shaken hikers' sense of safety along the famous footpath. Crews was caught nine days later walking from Maryland into Harpers Ferry, W.Va.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris | February 25, 2007
Carroll County firefighters rescued two hikers stuck on an ice-covered hillside in the McKeldin Area of Patapsco Valley State Park yesterday, said Sgt. Bill Rehkopf of the Sykesville Freedom District Fire Department. The two men in their mid-40s had been hiking on a trail that runs along the river. As they encountered icy conditions, the men worried that they would slip on the sloped ice and fall into the river, Rehkopf said. The men climbed up the steep hillside to the parking lot by grabbing onto trees.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2014
Patricia S. "Patty" Farber, a former private school art teacher and volunteer who climbed Mount Kilimanjaro when she was in her 60s, died May 10 of lung cancer at her home in Brewster, Mass. The longtime Towson resident was 87. "We got to know the Farbers through the Gilman School connection because our kids were there, and we did a lot of things together," said Richard W. Sunderland, a longtime close friend of Mrs. Farber and her husband. "Patty was a wonderful person and so full of life.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2014
A federal grand jury on Thursday indicted a 31-year-old Virginia man in the killing of a man in Maryland's Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park in December. David DiPaolo, of Bristow, Va., faces voluntary manslaughter charges accusing him of repeatedly striking a fellow hiker in the head with a blunt object in the Carderock area of the park after an argument on Dec. 28. DiPaolo was arrested by New York State Police on Jan. 8. If convicted, he could face a sentence of up to 15 years in prison.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2012
A just-opened boardwalk and creekside platform offer new access to a nature preserve at the southwestern edge of Anne Arundel County, providing kayakers with an entry by water and hikers with and a up-close encounters with its marsh. "The wetland is there. And you can see it through the trees. But without a boardwalk, you can't take advantage of it, both for research and the public," said Chris Swarth, the longtime director of the Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary. At 1,600 acres, it's the largest of Anne Arundel County's parks and hugs an area of the Patuxent River that is popular with kayakers and canoeists.
NEWS
October 15, 2012
Two Virginia veterinarians reported missing while hiking in Glacier National Park were found alive Monday, elated family members and park officials said. "Initial information indicates they are well and will be returning to their families! Yeah!" announced a post on the park's Facebook page, referring to Jason Hiser of Richmond, Va., and Neal Peckens of Herndon, Va. The two had been reported missing by their families Friday after failing to catch a flight home. Rescue teams located the men after as many as 50 people laboring in wintry conditions scoured back country near Two Medicine, Mont., for days by air, on foot and on horseback, aided by a dog team.
NEWS
September 2, 2012
There's an old joke about two hikers in the woods encountering an angry bear. When one turns to run, the other warns that he's not fast enough to outrun their ferocious adversary. "I only have to outrun you," the quicker-thinking hiker responds. And so it is with the candidacy of Mitt Romney, whose acceptance speech Thursday at the Republican National Convention may not have been the touchdown the pundits claimed he needed but was surely what his handlers wanted, playing up both the candidate's strength (management experience)
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | January 1, 2012
Christopher Tkacik, lost in the dark in a state park on Catoctin Mountain, had his dog, iPhone and a slowly draining battery. He could talk to the police trying to find him, but neither they nor the GPS on his smart phone could guide him out. So the 43-year-old attorney from Mount Airy turned on the device's flashlight and held it in the air. A trooper in a Maryland State Police helicopter, using night vision equipment, saw the "faint glow" from...
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | June 28, 1992
Standing beside a black locust tree, Kit Brown saw the makings of a tasty meal."There is a real, honest-to-goodness supermarket of food around this tree," Brown said as she stopped along a trail at the Harford Glen Environmental Education Center east of Bel Air.The 57-year-old Bel Air resident led the first public nature walk through part of the 300-acre center Tuesday, pointing to the many wonders of nature -- including some that are edible.Brown noted that the tree's blossoms are a flavorful ingredient in fritters, and elderberries from a bush surrounding the tree make good wines, pies and jellies.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2011
After a recent hike through Patapsco Valley State Park, Baltimore teacher Greg Schnitzlein's jaw dropped as he watched his two dogs emerge from the woods looking, as he says, like Chia Pets, every inch of their fur slathered in sproutlike seeds. Vanessa B. Beauchamp, a Towson University biology professor who happened to be in the parking lot, could hardly believe it. Those seed-covered dogs underscored the futility of the fight she has waged for years against an odd, sticky plant called wavyleaf basketgrass.
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