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By ASSOCIAGTED PRESS | June 14, 1991
WASHINGTON (AP) -- In an attempt at compromise with the Bush administration, the Senate has endorsed the creation of a National Highway System, a 185,000-mile grid of the most vital U.S. highways.But the Senate was unable to agree to changes in the controversial spending formula by which federal highway dollars are awarded to the states, slowing progress of the massive transportation bill.Republican senators planned to huddle today in an attempt both to resolve that dispute and to agree on efforts to divide the $8 billion surplus in the Highway Trust Fund.
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NEWS
December 3, 2012
In his recent commentary, Matt Patterson informed us that President Barack Obama's election to a second term in office is the death knell for liberty in this country and he sounds ready to pack up his bags and leave ("America the dictatorship?" Nov. 27). Fine. But before he goes, perhaps we should take a moment to compare and contrast Mr. Patterson's golden age of a free America (which he defines as prior to the passage of the 16th Amendment in 1913) with the Orwellian present in which we now live.
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NEWS
By STEPHANIE SHAPIRO and STEPHANIE SHAPIRO,SUN REPORTER | June 25, 2006
It may be the world's greatest public works project, but the United States interstate highway system doesn't inspire instant awe like the Great Wall of China, Egypt's pyramids and other man-made wonders. Some may admire the 46,837-mile network as a breathtaking engineering feat, but for millions of commuters, vacationers and errand runners, it is a simply a convenience built for a society with a mania for motion. But the interstate is remarkable for much more than its engineering. The system, which celebrates its 50th anniversary Thursday, has indelibly transformed American life -- for good and for bad. "In the simplest terms, the interstate helped us to determine where we put our houses, our factories, how we transport our livestock and food products, and how much we can distribute," says William L. Withuhn, curator of transportation at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History, where an exhibit called America on the Move is on display.
NEWS
By Peter Wallsten and Peter Wallsten,Los Angeles Times | December 7, 2008
WASHINGTON - President-elect Barack Obama pledged yesterday to launch the biggest public works program since the construction of the interstate highway system in the 1950s as part of his plan to create 2.5 million new jobs and stem an economic tailspin that is growing worse by the day. "We need action - and action now," Obama said in a weekly address broadcast on radio and posted as a YouTube video. His comments came the day after the government announced that 533,000 jobs had been lost in November - the worst monthly job loss report in 34 years.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 19, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The House of Representatives yesterday approved a compromise bill that would repeal the national speed limit, establish a national highway system and free states from a generation of federal regulations, including motorcycle helmet requirements, putting metric information on road signs and a billboard ban on scenic highways.The measure was approved in the House on a voice vote. The Senate passed the bill Friday, 80-16.The bill would loosen Washington's control over a number of transportation issues.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | October 5, 1995
About the traffic on Route 140 around Westminster that began last week to squeeze into a single snail-paced lane -- get used to it. Construction crews from Genstar Inc. have started work on a $3 million contract that iounty seat. Workers also will patch the concrete surface of Route 140 from the intersection of Route 31 to Sandymount Road, and patch and resurface with asphalt from Sandymount Road to Route 91. Crews have begun installing the sensors.As the patching work begins on Route 140, State Highway Administration (SHA)
NEWS
June 22, 1991
Congress, with the sometimes reluctant assent of the Bush administration, is halfway through the task of radically overhauling this nation's federal transportation policy. With the 35-year-old interstate highway system nearing completion, it is time for a new approach, one that gives far greater stress to repairing existing roads and bridges and promoting mass transit programs than to new highway construction.The president started this reassessment when he proposed a $105-billion, 5-year transportation program with an enlarged national highway system eligible for federal funds.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 17, 1997
Richard H. Trainor, who helped improve Maryland roads and mass transit systems during 41 years in state and Baltimore government, died of a heart attack Sunday at his Homeland residence. He was 67."Wherever you go in the state, Richard Trainor has left his mark," said former Gov. William Donald Schaefer, who appointed him state secretary of transportation in 1987."If a guy's good, you don't tell him what to do, and he was competent, very competent. I have nothing but the highest regard and praise for him," Mr. Schaefer said.
NEWS
By Robin Miller | December 6, 1990
CHARLES STREET is being repaved from Homeland to Gittings. Cold Spring Lane, just west of Charles, is partially closed. Downtown, Mulberry Street can't be used for two critical blocks. The streets around Hopkins Hospital, and the resulting traffic mess, can't be described in polite company.Right now it's subway construction that's being blamed for most of the downtown traffic imbroglios. In Towson, a desperately needed mall is being built, so teen-agers can have some place to escape from their overcrowded schools.
NEWS
By THE SACRAMENTO BEE | June 18, 2006
SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- In 1919, as a young Army colonel, Dwight D. Eisenhower crossed the country in a military convoy -- 62 arduous days over desert sand, through rivers and on basic roads that crumbled beneath wheels, tipping vehicles over. Eisenhower wrote that it was one of the worst experiences of his life. Fittingly, 50 years ago this month, in 1956, President Eisenhower launched a drastic undertaking -- construction of the federal interstate highway system. The highway web, now nearly 47,000 miles long, transformed American life, making it possible for families to travel throughout their vast country, and greatly boosting interstate shipping.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER and MICHAEL DRESSER,SUN REPORTER | June 29, 2006
Fifty years ago this week, an old-time Baltimore machine politician who hated freeway driving rose on the floor of the U.S. House of Representatives and moved to accept a compromise with the Senate on what he called "the greatest governmental construction program in the history of the world." "Through the provisions of this bill, the American people will ride safely upon many thousands of miles of broad, straight, trouble-free roads, four to eight lines wide, criss-crossing America from coast to coast and border to border," said Maryland Rep. George H. Fallon.
NEWS
By STEPHANIE SHAPIRO and STEPHANIE SHAPIRO,SUN REPORTER | June 25, 2006
It may be the world's greatest public works project, but the United States interstate highway system doesn't inspire instant awe like the Great Wall of China, Egypt's pyramids and other man-made wonders. Some may admire the 46,837-mile network as a breathtaking engineering feat, but for millions of commuters, vacationers and errand runners, it is a simply a convenience built for a society with a mania for motion. But the interstate is remarkable for much more than its engineering. The system, which celebrates its 50th anniversary Thursday, has indelibly transformed American life -- for good and for bad. "In the simplest terms, the interstate helped us to determine where we put our houses, our factories, how we transport our livestock and food products, and how much we can distribute," says William L. Withuhn, curator of transportation at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History, where an exhibit called America on the Move is on display.
NEWS
By THE SACRAMENTO BEE | June 18, 2006
SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- In 1919, as a young Army colonel, Dwight D. Eisenhower crossed the country in a military convoy -- 62 arduous days over desert sand, through rivers and on basic roads that crumbled beneath wheels, tipping vehicles over. Eisenhower wrote that it was one of the worst experiences of his life. Fittingly, 50 years ago this month, in 1956, President Eisenhower launched a drastic undertaking -- construction of the federal interstate highway system. The highway web, now nearly 47,000 miles long, transformed American life, making it possible for families to travel throughout their vast country, and greatly boosting interstate shipping.
NEWS
By George F. Will | November 11, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Forced by circumstances beyond thei control, which all circumstances seem to be, to choose a new speaker, House Republicans, a proudly nonconformist and notably predictable crowd, thought long and hard, as thinking is measured here. After a few hours, they determined that the best speaker would be the man who praises the emblematic result of the last Congress, the $217 billion highway bill.Bike paths to the 21st centuryThat bill, with its more than 1,850 bicycle paths, "demonstration projects" and other acts of uncomplicated rapacity, strikes Rep. Bob Livingston as a splendid jobs program:"A lot of people are going to have highways because of that bill and a lot of people are going to have jobs because of that bill and a lot of people are going to be better off throughout America because of that bill.
NEWS
By Paul Dean and Paul Dean,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 24, 1997
SAN DIEGO -- Dumb questions you might never think to ask a smart highway: Can one be cited for driving under the influence when one is under the influence but not actually driving?In a car programmed to auto-commute to work, will there be a pause button should personal plumbing suggest an earlier exit?When computers crash, will cars crash?Who gets sued if one driverless vehicle rear-ends another?So a guy has been steeped in full and personal control of cars since Dad put him on his lap behind the wheel of the family Pontiac and now he's driving by wire -- look Ma, no hands or feet!
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 17, 1997
Richard H. Trainor, who helped improve Maryland roads and mass transit systems during 41 years in state and Baltimore government, died of a heart attack Sunday at his Homeland residence. He was 67."Wherever you go in the state, Richard Trainor has left his mark," said former Gov. William Donald Schaefer, who appointed him state secretary of transportation in 1987."If a guy's good, you don't tell him what to do, and he was competent, very competent. I have nothing but the highest regard and praise for him," Mr. Schaefer said.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER and MICHAEL DRESSER,SUN REPORTER | June 29, 2006
Fifty years ago this week, an old-time Baltimore machine politician who hated freeway driving rose on the floor of the U.S. House of Representatives and moved to accept a compromise with the Senate on what he called "the greatest governmental construction program in the history of the world." "Through the provisions of this bill, the American people will ride safely upon many thousands of miles of broad, straight, trouble-free roads, four to eight lines wide, criss-crossing America from coast to coast and border to border," said Maryland Rep. George H. Fallon.
NEWS
By Peter Wallsten and Peter Wallsten,Los Angeles Times | December 7, 2008
WASHINGTON - President-elect Barack Obama pledged yesterday to launch the biggest public works program since the construction of the interstate highway system in the 1950s as part of his plan to create 2.5 million new jobs and stem an economic tailspin that is growing worse by the day. "We need action - and action now," Obama said in a weekly address broadcast on radio and posted as a YouTube video. His comments came the day after the government announced that 533,000 jobs had been lost in November - the worst monthly job loss report in 34 years.
NEWS
By Neal R. Peirce | January 13, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Will 1997 mean more ISTEA (non-highway transit systems) -- or a cup of "Hot Tea" (Highways Only Transportation)?The choice has to be made this year because ISTEA, the landmark Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991, prescribing how about $25 billion a year in federal gasoline taxes are allocated to states and metropolitan regions for highways and other transit, will expire Dec. 31.ISTEA, for the first time in American history,...
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 19, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The House of Representatives yesterday approved a compromise bill that would repeal the national speed limit, establish a national highway system and free states from a generation of federal regulations, including motorcycle helmet requirements, putting metric information on road signs and a billboard ban on scenic highways.The measure was approved in the House on a voice vote. The Senate passed the bill Friday, 80-16.The bill would loosen Washington's control over a number of transportation issues.
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