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NEWS
June 14, 1991
State highway chief Hal Kassoff told a coalition of road contractors, engineers and labor unions yesterday that he plans to launch 26 road construction projects worth $85 million this summer if, as expected, the legislature agrees to raise more than 70 motor vehicle fees later this month.Mr. Kassoff told Marylanders for Efficient and Safe Highways at the Baltimore-Washington International Marriott Hotel that he plans to restart all the road projects put out for bid before Dec. 10, when the state froze spending on most new transportation construction.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2014
Bonaventure von P. "Duke" Wachter, a retired State Highway Administration civil engineer who worked on numerous highway projects throughout Maryland, died May 23 of cancer at Coastal Hospice at the Lake in Salisbury. He was 69. "He was probably the best boss I've ever had in my life, and he was probably the best on-the-job-trained engineer that the State Highway Administration ever had," said Tony Smith, a former SHA civil engineer who lives in Nottingham. "Duke came up through the ranks.
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NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | November 2, 1993
State transportation officials told Anne Arundel County politicians and community members yesterday that dwindling resources will put many local highway projects on hold.Hal Kassoff, state highway administrator, said that tax revenue and federal grants during the booming development years of the 1980s helped boost spending for highway projects. Resources peaked in 1990 when the state set aside $750 million for roads.As the economy weakened, tax revenues fell. "The outlook for the late 1990s looks poor," Mr. Kassoff said, predicting that combined federal and state spending for highway projects will fall below $400 million a year by the 1997 fiscal year.
NEWS
December 20, 2012
I have a few comments about increasing the gas tax ("Get Maryland moving," Dec. 17). First of all, before they take any more of my money, they need to make it impossible to raid the Transportation Trust Fund, like they have done in the past. I wouldn't mind it if there wasn't so much of the current money being wasted. Let me give you a few examples I have noticed recently. I have property near Berkeley Springs, W.Va., and I have used I-70 for the last 35 years to get there. The intersection near Frederick has been changed at least twice in the past, say, 10 years.
NEWS
July 19, 1996
NO ONE SHOULD BE surprised at the recent dismissal of state roads chief Hal Kassoff. The amazing thing is that he lasted as long as he did, given the animus Gov. Parris N. Glendening expressed toward Mr. Kassoff even before his first day as Maryland's chief executive.The governor apparently held a grudge against Mr. Kassoff for disputes he had with the state highway administrator during Mr. Glendening's long tenure as Prince George's county executive. He never forgave, or forgot. But Mr. Glendening was told so often by politicians and transportation experts that Mr. Kassoff excelled at his job that the governor kept him on. Until now.There's no doubt that Mr. Kassoff is headstrong and tenacious, at one point ignoring a request that he quietly submit his resignation.
NEWS
By Jennifer M. Sims and Jennifer M. Sims,SUN STAFF | November 13, 2002
The state will begin construction on 15 highway projects in Baltimore County in the next fiscal year - including the long-awaited extension of White Marsh Boulevard - Transportation Secretary John D. Porcari has informed county officials. The projects are part of the state Department of Transportation's six-year, $722.9 million budget for the county, which Pocari reviewed with officials at a recent meeting. One project not on the list, however, is construction of an interchange at Dolfield Boulevard and Interstate 795. County Executive C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger called it the county's top priority.
NEWS
March 1, 1992
Here's what to look for if you're traveling in the Baltimore metropolitan area this week. This list of highway projects includes only newly announced work, not continuing construction, which is extensive on several highways, including Interstate 95, U.S. 50/301 and the Baltimore-Washington Parkway.New highway projectsThere are no new projects for the week of March 1.Bus route changes:The MTA has scheduled the following changes in bus routes for this week. For more information, call 539-5000; TTY for the hearing-impaired, 539-3497.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Evening Sun Staff | June 14, 1991
The speaker of the House of Delegates has warned highway contractors that legislators are not overwhelmingly in favor of a bill to raise motor vehicle fees to pay for highway projects."
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2011
A Hagerstown man pleaded guilty Monday to federal charges of making a false statement by falsely certifying that precast concrete his company manufactured for two high-profile State Highway Administration projects met government standards. Santos Eliazar Rivas, 32, admitted guilt on three counts as part of a plea agreement with the U.S. attorney's office in Baltimore. According to prosecutors, Rivas was the director of quality control for Frederick Precast Concrete at a time when the company delivered precast structures for the Woodrow Wilson Bridge replacement project and a project on Interstate 70 that were weaker than they should have been because corners were cut in the manufacturing process.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2010
When Gov. Martin O'Malley announced the award of a $2 million contract to replace the deck of a bridge over the Capital Beltway in Prince George's County this month, it signaled the end of a yearlong rollout of projects financed by the economic stimulus program launched by President Barack Obama. But the party isn't over. The economic impact of the $317 million in Maryland highway spending financed by the stimulus is expected to linger through next year and into 2012. State officials hope the flow of money will taper off just as transportation revenue begins to bounce back from years of recession that have forced severe cutbacks in construction.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | December 21, 2009
Rush hour Tuesday on Interstate 695 north of Baltimore could be a little more congestedl. State highway officials plan to begin another months-long project on the Beltway between I-83 and Charles Street, changing the way traffic flows. The State Highway Administration plans to begin a long-term temporary split of the lanes along the Inner Loop Monday night, and officials are advising motorists to allow a little extra time. By Tuesday morning, provided lingering effects of this weekend's snow storm do not cause a delay, the three eastbound lanes will be open but split with concrete barriers - two lanes to the left and one to the right.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | June 30, 2009
Environmental groups and smart growth advocates Monday applauded Maryland's use of almost $225 million in federal stimulus funds, saying the state's decision to concentrate spending on highway maintenance projects is a wise use of resources and an effective way to create jobs. Maryland was one of 10 states and the District of Columbia that elected to spend 100 percent of the money they put toward road projects on preserving existing infrastructure rather than adding new capacity, according to a report issued by Smart Growth America.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,paul.west@baltsun.com | March 13, 2009
Washington -President Barack Obama says unprecedented transparency will be a hallmark of his presidency. But following the money in the stimulus package might not be as easy as he suggests. Almost daily, state and federal officials proclaim their commitment to openness. Just yesterday, in conjunction with a day-long White House conference that dealt largely with that subject, Gov. Martin O'Malley expressed his determination to help Maryland citizens track federal stimulus dollars with "accountability, transparency and efficiency."
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun reporter | July 6, 2008
The highway that leaders of Anne Arundel and Howard counties most want improved is Route 175 connecting Fort Meade to the busy intersection at U.S. 1 in Jessup, but prospects look dim for sufficient state money any time soon. For the second year in a row, Howard County Executive Ken Ulman made planning for a new U.S. 1 interchange with Route 175 his top priority in a letter to John D. Porcari, Maryland's transportation secretary. Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold also said widening the road that connects the two counties is his top highway priority, especially with the influx of workers expected within the next three years with the relocation of military base personnel.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | November 19, 2005
William Roe Kahl, a former partner in the Baltimore civil engineering firm of Rummel Klepper & Kahl, died of a heart attack Monday at a hospital in Jupiter, Fla. The former Reisterstown resident was 94. Mr. Kahl was born in Baltimore and raised on Reisterstown Road. After graduating from Polytechnic Institute, he earned a bachelor's degree in civil engineering from the Johns Hopkins University in 1932. He later earned a master's degree in civil engineering from Brooklyn Polytechnic College in Brooklyn, N.Y. While at Hopkins, he was manager of the lacrosse team that participated in the 1932 Olympics in Los Angeles, said his son, W. Bailey Kahl of Sapulpa, Okla.
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