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NEWS
December 19, 2013
For what reason is Highlandtown now called Canton? I live in Harford County now but grew up in Highlandtown near Haussner's restaurant and Eastern Avenue. I went to school at Sacred Heart of Jesus in Highlandtown. Highlandtown was in the higher elevation in Baltimore with boundaries that included Hudson Street and Fait Street up to Dean Street and the underpass next to Greektown and from Pratt and Baltimore Streets to Patterson Park Avenue and around the park. Canton was always further south down to Boston Street and the water.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
Two men were shot - one of them fatally - in Highlandtown on Tuesday just after midnight, police said. The shooting occurred in the 3700 block of E. Pratt St. at about 12:30 a.m., police said. Officers were called for a report of gunshots heard in the area and found a man who had been shot in the back. He died at a hospital. Police said a second victim was found "nearby" with non-life-threatening injuries. Police did not release the ages or identities of the victims. A motive and suspect description was not provided.
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BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2013
The Highlandtown building that once was Haussner's restaurant is scheduled for auction next month. "I just think it's a good time to do this," said Joseph Schultz, the owner of the roughly 28,000 square foot building, which he bought in 2011. The market is improving, he said, and interest in Highlandtown among investors is high. He's selling the restaurant building, which he said needs to be renovated, along with three other properties at the intersection of Eastern Avenue and South Clinton Street.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
Artist Pablo Machioli hangs out in the belly of the letter "B. " Kyle Miller likes to linger in "U," a letter he helped shape from steel and pine. And bus driver Kaliha Taylor waits for her shift to begin while perched on the lower curve of "S. " Baltimore's most distinctive bus stop was unveiled late last month on the side of the Creative Alliance in Highlandtown. The trio of giant letters - which resemble a set piece from "Sesame Street" - has become a favorite spot for residents to lounge or pose for photos.
NEWS
From staff reports | February 1, 2014
Baltimore police Saturday identified a woman found dead in a Highlandtown row house Friday as 51-year-old Kimberly Leto. Police did not provide additional details, but a neighbor who did not want to be identified said investigators told her they believed it was a burglary. Friends said Leto worked at O'Donnell's Pub in Canton. From the front of the home, nothing appeared out of the ordinary except for two marked police SUVs parked on the street. "This is unusual for this block," said neighbor Greg Atkins.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2014
Baltimore Police arrested two teenagers Sunday in the beating death of a 51-year-old Highlandtown woman who was found dead inside her home Friday. Commissioner Anthony W. Batts held a news conference at police headquarters to announce the arrests of Alonzo Gorham-Ramos, 14, and Allen Pinkney, 16. Kimberly Leto, of the 400 block of S. Ellwood Ave., was found dead inside her home overlooking Patterson Park early Friday with what police described as "upper body trauma. " A neighbor said she was told by police the home had been broken into from the rear, and a chair could be observed pushed under the rear kitchen window, which was half-open.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | December 7, 2012
When I heard that Highlandtown had rolled out another holiday train garden, I hailed a cab and told the driver to take me to the Conkling Street firehouse. What I found was the authentic thing. Train gardens in firehouses are a wonderful tradition. This Highlandtown version is a community-based, all-volunteer project. Donors and local businesses come up with about $3,800. A raffle and public donations allow the electric trains to keep running on the $5,000 annual budget. And there are some beauties here, acknowledging the neighborhood's industrial heritage.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
Two men were shot - one of them fatally - in Highlandtown on Tuesday just after midnight, police said. The shooting occurred in the 3700 block of E. Pratt St. at about 12:30 a.m., police said. Officers were called for a report of gunshots heard in the area and found a man who had been shot in the back. He died at a hospital. Police said a second victim was found "nearby" with non-life-threatening injuries. Police did not release the ages or identities of the victims. A motive and suspect description was not provided.
NEWS
October 15, 2013
Like many Baltimoreans, we were saddened by the recent announcement that Santoni's Supermarket in Highlandtown plans to close its doors at the end of the month and lay off more than 80 employees. Santoni's has been a venerable neighborhood institution since the 1930s, and over that time it has built a loyal following among customers. These are difficult times for small businesses of all kinds, and particularly for independent grocers who operate on thin margins and face increasing competition not only from traditional chains like Giant, Safeway and Harris Teeter but also from discount warehouses and stores like Walmart and Target.
NEWS
By Nicholas C. D'Adamo Jr | April 9, 2001
BALTIMORE CITY is about to condemn and demolish 12 buildings at Eastern Avenue and Conkling Street in Highlandtown to build an $8 million, 45,000-square-foot branch for the Enoch Pratt Free Library. Supporters say that building a mega-library there will bring the Highlandtown business district back to life and improve the Pratt's service to the public. They are wrong. The $8 million building plan is not a wise use of taxpayer money at a time when we are cutting programs, closing fire stations and library branches and thinking about layoffs of city employees.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
If you're a fan of The Quest Bar on Fleet Street in East Baltimore, the good news is there's a big party there this Saturday. The bad news is the party is a last hurrah. After nearly 15 years, bar owner Tom Mathison is selling his longtime Highlandtown establishment -- perhaps the last true gay bar on the east side -- to developers, who plan to tear the tavern down and put in townhomes, he said Thursday. "It's just bittersweet when you've done something half your life, seeing it end," said Mathison, 66, who spent years tending bars on Boston Street and in Fells Point before starting Quest.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | July 11, 2014
Sometime in 1914, Luigi DiPasquale, who had left his home of Abruzzi, Italy, came to Baltimore and opened a corner store in Highlandtown. Ever the entrepreneur, he butchered and sold meats and also sold live goats tethered in the backyard. This week I spoke with his grandson, Joe DiPasquale, who continues the unbroken family tradition 100 years later. His business at 3700 Gough St. remains true to its original vision while adjusting to the times. Today, DiPasquale's Italian Marketplace is a thriving destination.
BUSINESS
By Sean Welsh, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
Baltimore's Latino Economic Development Center will open a satellite office along Eastern Avenue in Highlandtown, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake announced Wednesday. The office, to be located in space donated by the Southeast Community Development Corporation, is being set up to provide support "to existing and potential immigrant business owners," according to a release from the mayor's office. The office will help those business owners and potential owners with loans, technical assistance and training, the release said.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | May 16, 2014
The old-fashioned corner store is thriving on a quiet Southeast Baltimore cross street. The neighborhood institution has been repurposed as the Highlandtown Gallery, a place where local artists show their works in a well-lighted, clean place within an atmospheric Baltimore neighborhood. At the corner of Gough and Conkling, two blocks north of busy Eastern Avenue, the gallery has some traditional neighbors — a corner bar (the Laughing Pint), a funeral home (Joseph Zannino), a Roman Catholic church (Our Lady of Pompei)
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2014
Dr. John Vincent Woytowitz, a retired Highlandtown dentist, died of an infection March 13 at MedStar Franklin Square Medical Center. The Essex resident was 92. Born in Baltimore and raised in Highlandtown, he was the son of Peter and Bertha Woytowitz, who owned and operated Pete's Cafe at Foster and Highland avenues. He attended Sacred Heart of Jesus School and was a 1939 graduate of Mount St. Joseph's High School, where he played baseball and wrestled. He earned a bachelor's degree in chemistry in 1943 from what is now Loyola University Maryland.
FEATURES
By Samantha Iacia, For The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2014
Date: Dec. 31 Her story: Julie Russell, 31, grew up in White Marsh. She is a pediatric nurse on a neuro-behavioral unit, where she works with autistic children. Her parents, Bettyann and Robert Russell, live in White Marsh. His story: Eric Gullett, 32, grew up in Metamora, Ill. He moved to Maryland in 2006 to be near his mother, Patricia Johnson, who lives in Bel Air. He is a sales account manager for an engineering team at Aerotek Inc. in Hanover. His father, Christopher Gullett, lives in Las Vegas.
NEWS
By Antero Pietila | August 2, 1997
TWENTY-TWO years ago, Sweden's largest newspaper sent a reporter and photographer to Baltimore. They produced a series called "Highlandtown -- love it or leave it." The articles described white ethnic working-class life -- which was painted as bleak and hopeless.I remember that Anna-Lisa Backman and Ake Malmstrom of Stockholm's Dagens Nyheter worked hard. But when I returned to their impressions recently, I was struck by how different Highlandtown was in 1975.Their articles refer to big industrial employers that have since disappeared, along with the area's best-known retailers.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2010
Baltimore police detectives were investigating the stabbings of several people early Thursday in the Highlandtown area. Officers responded to Johns Hopkins Bayview Hospital for a report of aggravated assault by stabbing, said police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi. One victim told police that she and her friends were eating at Carlos O'Charlie's sports bar on Eastern Avenue when they started fighting with a group of women, according to Guglielmi. The woman and her friends left the bar and were walking in the 400 block of S. Conkling St. when they started fighting with a group of five to seven women, Gugliemli said.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2014
Baltimore will open several year-round, 24-hour centers to enforce the city's curfew for children and teens and connect troubled youths to services under a plan Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake unveiled Monday in her State of the City address. Youth Connection Centers, modeled after similar programs in Washington and Miami, will replace the city's curfew center in the Barclay neighborhood that operates from June to August. The first center is expected to open in the northwest or southeast section of the city by this summer, the mayor said.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2014
The teen homicide suspect stood with his head hung low Tuesday as his attorney pleaded unsuccessfully for a judge to take his youth and learning disabilities into consideration and grant him bail. Allen Pinkney, wearing the distinctive black-and-white T-shirt in which he was arrested Saturday, stood shackled in the second row of a courtroom in the Baltimore Central Booking and Intake Center. Pinkney, 16, is one of two teenagers who Baltimore police say fatally stabbed 51-year-old Kimberly Leto during a burglary Friday in Highlandtown.
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