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NEWS
April 16, 2012
First, I'm an 80-year-old living on Social Security, and I know all the tax loopholes need to be closed ("The Buffett Rule backlash," April 13). But isn't it correct that Warren Buffett owes the IRS a great deal of taxes for a number of years? Let's have a true picture of Mr. Buffett. The proposed reductions in Medicare and Medicaid costs will hopefully take place by reducing fraud in the systems and not by reducing services. Vera Papa
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NEWS
October 9, 2014
In addition to Max Obuszewski's prescient observation of what has become President Barack Obama's war, this perpetual war with no borders has gotten the support of much of the media and Congress ( "Has President Obama undergone a chance of heart?" Oct. 3). What began as a promise by President Obama not to engage in conflict with U.S. advisers has evolved to a debate over "boots on the ground," or, in other words, active combat. How many will be maimed and killed during this mission?
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NEWS
March 8, 2012
Isn't the governor supposed to represent the views of the constituents who elected him to office? The governor is opposed to the death penalty, so no murderers have been executed. Does that represent the wishes of the majority of Marylanders? The governor is for in-state tuition for illegals, which the majority of Marylanders are against. UnderMartin O'Malley's administration, we have seen increases in our taxes, tolls and fees. Now this man wants to add more to the already-high cost of gasoline.
NEWS
By Peter Morici | October 7, 2014
Despite another seemingly good jobs report, President Barack Obama's approval rating is lower than a snake's belly, and Republicans could retake the Senate in November. Missteps in the Ukraine, Iraq and elsewhere weigh on voters' minds, but the economy - especially the jobs picture - is not as healthy as Mr. Obama claims. The president has managed to increase employment 5.5 million - or about 4 percent. But measured against other presidents facing similar challenges, his performance is hardly stellar.
NEWS
August 26, 2011
Your editorial advocating tax increases to fix Annapolis' job-killing spending problem once again misses the mark ("Tax increases should be on the table," Aug. 23). Government's insistence on uncontrolled, unsustainable spending has saddled future generations of Americans with record debt. Believing that significant cuts are not immediately needed is both naive and unwise. Maryland's revenues have not kept pace with the growth of the state budget, forcing elected officials to scramble to cover billion dollar-plus deficits.
NEWS
July 23, 2010
Thousands of Marylanders are in the paradoxical situation described by Richard Thompson (Readers Respond, "Assessments down, taxes up," July 21) who says a decrease in the Homestead Tax Credit is the problem. I disagree. The Homestead Tax Credit is not based on property assessments, as Mr. Thompson suggests. Instead, it limits yearly increases in property tax bills for owner-occupied homes. For Baltimore City and Baltimore County, the limit is 4 per cent. So when property assessments in these locales were soaring 25-to-35 per cent yearly, tax bills crept up at a modest pace, thanks to the 4 per cent limit in the Homestead Tax Credit.
NEWS
March 21, 2012
The Sun's editorial ("A costly breakthrough," March 13) appears right on when it stated: "We cannot escape the fear that senators are seeking to raise more money than is truly necessary to make their [tax] plan work. " One only needs to look at the headlines of The Sun three days later ("Senate votes for tax on rich," March 16) to realize how prophetic the editorial was. The comments of elected officials are focused more on defending taxing the more affluent than the need for the revenue.
NEWS
January 19, 2012
Gov.Martin O'Malleysays he needs higher taxes to create jobs in Maryland. Since Maryland does not require subcontractors to validate citizenship, most of the new jobs will most likely go to illegals, or new Americans as the governor likes to call them. Most working families in this state cannot afford higher taxes, tolls, and fees. Working people deal with spending cuts every month when the bills come in. It is high time the morons in Annapolis take a lesson from them. The Maryland legislature is lazy and has always taken the easy way out - taxes.
NEWS
May 21, 2012
Your article ("O'Malley faces political risks of tax increases," May 17) suggests that Gov.Martin O'Malley's future political ambitions will be damaged by his successful efforts to raise taxes on the wealthy. But I ask, would his prospects have been enhanced if he had allowed major cuts in funding for health care, education, environmental clean up, and programs that benefit the elderly, children, homeless, handicapped and developmentally disabled? I think not. As a business executive whose tax burden will undoubtedly go up as a result of these measures, I could not in good conscience oppose these tax increases.
NEWS
November 29, 2011
This past week Sen. John Kerry explained that tax increases are necessary due the current federal government's revenue shortfall (less citizen income, less income tax revenues). This all-too-common view assumes the moral right of government to a constantly rising income stream when neither businesses nor families enjoy such a right. Businesses and families have to live in economic reality; most governments - state and local as well as federal - don't. When governments spend every last cent by fiscal year-end, fail to pass budgets, and repeatedly fail to set aside rainy-day funds, that is financial mismanagement.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
The nation's transportation system is broken, agreed a panel of transportation wonks gathered in downtown Baltimore on Thursday, but they could not agree on how to fix it. "Transportation is broken. There's no way to fund it. America is one big pothole," said Ray LaHood, a former U.S. transportation secretary. "It will be up to the American people to say enough is enough. " Opinions for fixing it at the Greater Baltimore Committee's seventh annual transportation summit ranged from increasing federal investment in local infrastructure projects that would help address broader issues to cutting all federal investment in such projects to focus on national highway needs instead.
NEWS
July 1, 2014
The Fourth of July weekend is traditionally one of the busiest travel times of the year, and it's a safe bet that a lot of Marylanders will hit the roads to Ocean City and beyond. As often happens when mid-summer vacations beckon, gas prices are up and motorists may be tempted to fume about the state's fuel taxes, which increased on July 1. They shouldn't. If anyone wants to find a culprit for rising gasoline prices, they should look to Iraq and other suppliers and not Annapolis.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | June 25, 2014
A few weeks ago I was visited in my office by the chairman of one of the country's biggest high-tech firms. He wanted to talk about the causes and consequences of widening inequality and the shrinking middle class, and what to do about it. I asked him why he was concerned. "Because the American middle class is the core of our customer base," he said. "If they can't afford our products in the years ahead, we're in deep trouble. " I'm hearing the same refrain these days from a growing number of business leaders.
NEWS
November 7, 2013
Iowa has a lower cost of living than Maryland and a more business-friendly environment, says a senior vice president of Fidelity ( "Fidelity & Guaranty Life Insurance Co. moving headquarters to Iowa," Nov. 4). But will that mean anything to Gov. Martin O'Malley, House Speaker Michael E. Busch or Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller, Maryland's champions of higher taxes at any cost? It hasn't in the past so there's no reason to believe that it will now. Let Fidelity eat cake is the mantra of Maryland.
NEWS
July 16, 2013
I am responding to your editorial in which you take aim at Republicans for daring to protest the gas tax, the rain tax and the tolls that became effective July 1 ("Tolls, taxes and fees," July 3). Specifically, you condemn the Republican leadership for consistently "reducing complex matters to simplistic catch-phrases," and for doing nothing more than attack, attack and attack. The editorial makes no mention of Republican efforts through legislation to provide different solutions to the state's transportation infrastructure problems, Chesapeake Bay pollution and the Maryland Transportation Authority's obligation to pay for outstanding bonds.
NEWS
July 5, 2013
Sen. Nancy Jacobs' commentary was right on the mark ("Marylanders' wallets run on empty," July 2). Gov. Martin O'Malley and the many state senators and delegates in the Maryland General Assembly who voted for higher gasoline taxes, tolls and fees have placed a further burden on Maryland's working families, businesses and retirees. One of their purported goals for this ill-gotten increased revenue is the construction of more expensive light rail systems that we cannot afford and which will not pay for themselves.
NEWS
August 19, 2011
Warren Buffett was right for his call for higher taxes/debunking the "lost jobs" claim of the ideologues ("Buffett wants wealthier Americans taxed more," Aug. 16). Thanks to the tea party, controlling the spiraling debt is now a priority. Now the tea party representatives need to actually "govern. " The magnitude of the debt cannot be addressed by spending cuts alone! The GOP hard line of "no new taxes" has morphed into an idiotic stand on retaining the multiple special deals/exemptions, etc. The GOP has lost its focus of its bedrock support of the free enterprise system.
EXPLORE
August 16, 2011
Last week at the Howard County Fair, I spoke with Comptroller Peter Franchot about the upcoming Special Session. We discussed Governor O'Malley's comments that he is open to increasing taxes during the Special Session in October. I was pleased to hear that the comptroller agreed with me that during such difficult economic times, the last thing that the state of Maryland should be doing is raising taxes. With Maryland being 50th in the nation in private sector job creation, we need to take steps to encourage job growth not discourage it. Instead of raising taxes, Maryland needs to enact legislation and implement regulations that will demonstrate to employers that they are welcome in Maryland.
EXPLORE
April 23, 2013
As a long time resident of Maryland state and Howard County, I am so concerned about the many taxes and fees being imposed on all of us. Even more surprising is that no articles or letters to the editor have been forthcoming in letting us know the entire budget of both bodies of governments, exactly where all the tax dollars and fees are going. We are currently living in a very serious economic situation, people are either losing their jobs, having reduced incomes, paying higher taxes, insurance premiums, utilities, clothing, food, the future of our children's college education, etc., and yet our governments continue to make it more difficult to spread our income to even the most critical of our survival.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2013
This time last year, the Maryland General Assembly was mired in anger and confusion. The House and Senate were feuding over taxes and casino gambling. Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller and House Speaker Michael E. Busch were butting heads. Lawmakers were heading into the final day without even having passed the budget - the one task with which they are charged in the state constitution. It took two special sessions to clean up the mess. This year, legislators will begin the session's final day Monday having already passed an array of landmark legislation - repealing Maryland's death penalty, adopting one of the nation's toughest gun laws, raising the gas tax for the first time in two decades and signing off on a $1 billion plan to rebuild Baltimore's crumbling schools.
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