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NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | July 3, 2013
Jobs are returning with depressing slowness, and most of the new jobs pay less than the jobs that were lost in the Great Recession. Economic determinists assume that globalization and technological advancement necessarily condemn a large portion of the American workforce to underemployment and stagnant wages, while rewarding those with the best educations and connections with ever higher wages and wealth. Many on the right of the political spectrum say we should accept this outcome because we mustn't interfere with the free market.
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NEWS
June 13, 2013
The qualifications of NSA leaker Edward Snowden highlight a very real problem facing the information technology profession ("NSA leaks shift focus to private firms' role in U.S. intelligence," June 11). The IT profession has many good, respectable members and industry certifications. But it lacks higher education, national licensing and bonding requirements. Edward Snowden is not unique. He had access as an IT professional to information prohibited by his organization's policies and procedures, yet he was able to avail himself of it. Almost any organization has IT staff who can, if they wish, access almost any and all sensitive and confidential information.
NEWS
By Anne D. Neal | May 29, 2013
"Please sir, I want some more. " The famous phrase of Oliver Twist would seem tragically appropriate when it comes to the modus operandi of American higher education - but for the fact that Oliver Twist was a starving child and higher education is a bloated wastrel. But the higher ed bubble is bursting, right in our own backyard. And colleges and universities need to take note, to ensure their own survival. The case in point is St. Mary's College of Maryland, a 173-year-old public institution tucked between the Potomac River and Chesapeake Bay. After a decade of rising tuition, this public liberal arts college finds itself with 150 empty seats for the incoming freshman class.
NEWS
May 1, 2013
To understand what Fred Lazarus accomplished during his 35 years as president of the Maryland Institute College of Art , one need only look at the gleaming concrete-and-glass structure housing the school's Brown Center for new media. The rakishly angled building rising above the school's Mount Royal Avenue campus symbolizes the future of both art and higher education in America as surely as the stately neoclassical building across the street from it reflects its past. Mr. Lazarus, who announced this week that he will step down as president in 2014, had the genius to see that future and the skill to build it in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2013
Nicholas P. Jones, dean of the Johns Hopkins University's Whiting School of Engineering, has been named the new executive vice president and provost at Penn State University, the college announced Friday. Jones was selected from a nationwide search, according to a release from the university, and will start his post on July 1. His appointment is scheduled to be approved by Penn State's Board of Trustees on May 3. Penn State's president Rodney Erickson, who recently served in the position, said Jones "brings with him board experience in higher education" and "will be an important voice as we continue our trajectory of top-flight academic achievement and set priorities for the university's future.
NEWS
By Bernard C. “Jack” Young | March 26, 2013
For many Marylanders, Gov. Martin O'Malley's proposed fiscal year 2014 budget includes plenty to celebrate. The governor's "balanced approach" to budgeting translates into increased employment, health care benefits for additional families and continued investment in programs that directly support primary education. The governor's budget also includes encouraging signs that Maryland's recovery from the Great Recession is gathering steam. But despite those successes, the budget fails to fully invest in some of our state's brightest minds.
NEWS
March 11, 2013
Thanks to Joseph Urgo, president of St. Mary's College of Maryland, for his editorial smackdown of those who think of higher education only as vocational training ("Why we need the liberal arts," March 3). His point about preparing students to really think about what makes a meaningful life versus just learning to "make a living" was well taken. It also makes me proud that our education system in Maryland supports the broader educational outlook that is only possible through rigorous study of the great philosophers, artists and thinkers who have done the most to shape our world.
NEWS
By Javier Miyares | February 26, 2013
Nineteen thousand four hundred thirteen. Focus on that number. Like so many numbers in news articles, you might easily have skipped over 19,413. But this is an important number for what is happening in Maryland higher education. According to the Cyber Security Jobs Report issued this month, this is the number of job openings in Maryland, as of October 2012, for qualified cybersecurity professionals. These are good, high-paying jobs. They are in such demand that the unemployment rate for people who qualify for them must be nearly zero.
NEWS
February 10, 2013
The decision last week by Morgan State University's governing board to oust Dallas R. Evans as chairman appears to have been the culmination of a bitter struggle over the school's leadership between Mr. Evans and University President David Wilson. In December, Mr. Evans tried to orchestrate Mr. Wilson's dismissal after only 21/2 years on the job by persuading the school's 15-member Board of Regents not to renew the president's contract when it ends in June. But then an outpouring of support for Mr. Wilson from students, faculty members and community leaders forced the board to reverse its decision a few weeks later.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2013
A division of the World Bank Group announced Wednesday that it has invested $150 million in Laureate Education Inc., giving the international development organization a small stake in the Baltimore-based global higher education company. "It's an incredibly strong endorsement for the company," said Douglas L. Becker, Laureate's chairman and CEO, of the investment by the International Finance Corp. and its affiliate, the IFC African, Latin American and Caribbean Fund. With annual revenue of about $4 billion, Laureate does not need the money but is eager to have the backing of an investor led by members of international governments, he said.
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