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By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | December 6, 2003
In a move that has caught some Maryland college officials by surprise, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. has chosen former Coppin State College President Calvin W. Burnett as his new secretary of higher education. Ehrlich spokesman Shareese DeLeaver said yesterday that the governor would likely make his formal announcement on Burnett next week. As higher- education secretary, Burnett would lead the Maryland Higher Education Commission, an agency with a paid staff of 60 and unpaid board of 12 that is charged with coordinating policy among the state's private and public colleges.
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NEWS
By John L. Hudgins | September 30, 2014
Following the urban unrest in the 1960s, there was a move toward requiring college degrees for police officers. That movement never gained serious momentum across the nation. Today only a few of the police departments across the country require applicants to possess a college degree, and concerns are still being raised as to whether today's police officers are best prepared to deal with the myriad of situations presented in modern policing. Indeed there are serious questions as to whether a modern democracy can survive without better prepared law enforcement officials able to handle the stresses of the job without overreacting.
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NEWS
December 20, 2010
In your article "Universities are slowly tiptoeing into taming costs with efficiency" (Dec. 19), the argument is made that universities, by increasing class size, reducing professors and lectures, adding teaching by teaching assistants and increasing computer grading, can maintain educational standards while saving money in these tough economic times. This thesis is so oversimplified as to be simply false, or, at best, true only in a few limited cases. I cannot speak authoritatively to whether this higher education solution is ever possible in chemistry courses and some other natural sciences, but in the humanities and social sciences it is always educationally destructive.
NEWS
August 5, 2014
I am a member of the team that worked with University of Maryland University College President Javier Miyares and Board Chair Mark Gerencser to propose a plan to reorganize UMUC to meet the rapidly evolving changes in the way higher education is delivered worldwide ( "Transforming UMUC," July 30). In order to meet these difficult and complex challenges, exceptional leadership is essential, and Mr. Miyares and Mr. Gerencser have met those challenges with open and transparent leadership that has resulted in the formation of an exceptional plan moving forward.
NEWS
October 23, 2011
University System of Maryland Chancellor William E. "Brit" Kirwan, who is in the midst of gathering input on the question of whether the University of Maryland-College Park and the University of Maryland-Baltimore should be merged, says it would be a shame if politics took primacy over the interests of higher education. Too late for that. The issue came up in the most political way possible - with Senate President and top College Park booster Thomas V. Mike Miller waltzing into the Budget and Taxation Committee this spring and inserting language that appeared to require the merger.
NEWS
May 27, 2010
The legacy of Raymond Haysbert goes beyond business and politics ("Business and policy leader Raymond V. Haysbert Sr. 1920-2010," May 25). He was also a visionary in higher education and played an important role in an innovative program developed at Johns Hopkins in the 1990s. The Leadership Development Program for Minority Managers (LDP) was designed to attract a cohort of mid-level black professionals who sought a challenging and supportive academic business environment that combined the rich resources of the university and the Baltimore business community.
NEWS
March 18, 2014
The total per credit cost for in-county students at Harford Community College was increased last week to $124.80, which translates to $374.40 for a single three-credit class. It's hardly a king's ransom. College officials are also quick to point out that it is a bargain relative to the cost of attending even a Maryland college system facility as an in-state student. Still, as has been noted before, the latest round of increases (to fees rather than tuition, a distinction that's meaningful only to hair-splitters)
NEWS
By Kevin J. Manning | October 13, 2010
This summer, the U.S. Department of Education introduced a proposal to regulate for-profit universities. Referred to in education circles as the "gainful employment" regulations, the proposal seeks to protect students with the highest financial need who enroll at these institutions, to ensure the likelihood that they will be able to find employment and repay their loans after completing their certificate or degree programs. The Department of Education is proposing a new sanction, namely that if the for-profit programs are not producing "gainful employment" opportunities for these students, those institutions will lose their student aid eligibility — a major source of income for these education companies.
NEWS
January 9, 2013
The current political divide in Congress offers an opportunity for Americans to have a conversation about federal spending, which should not be confused with investing federal dollars to grow the economy ("Trouble ahead," Jan. 2). Are continuing to rebuild our infrastructure and educating our children an appropriate use of federal dollars? I believe they are, and here's why: College affordability remains an issue for most students and their families, despite the 2012 Pell Grant appropriation of $30.3 billion.
NEWS
By Peter Morici | April 30, 2012
Young people face a cruel irony. Most can't land a decent job without a college education, yet many graduates are locked into poorly paying positions that don't permit repayment of student loans. For two generations, college price tags have risen much faster than inflation and families' ability to pay. More importantly, costs have leaped faster than what graduates can earn over working lifetimes, and many diplomas do not offer a positive return on investment, as measured by graduates' ability to service their debt.
NEWS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
Maryland joins at least a dozen other states Tuesday in banning the sale of 190-proof grain alcohol, a measure that lawmakers hope will help to reduce sexual assaults and binge drinking among college students. The bill is one of more than 200 that go into effect Tuesday; other bills expand the earned income tax credit for low-income residents and exempt more wealthy Marylanders from the estate tax, overhaul Baltimore City liquor board practices and establish incentives to encourage investment in research universities.
NEWS
By Tom Sadowski | June 20, 2014
While many aspects of the college experience are steeped in tradition, every year more college graduates are leaving the customary path and seeking less traditional methods of employment, most notably, as entrepreneurs. The number of graduates choosing to become their own boss is growing, and whether they are designing new mobile applications, developing new products or winning grants to support innovative social change, the first job many will hold is the position of "entrepreneur. " While entrepreneurial success may look spontaneous at times, it is more often the result of skills developed by way of experience and repeated failure.
NEWS
By Peter Morici | June 16, 2014
Despite five years of economic recovery, college graduates continue to face a tough job market. Certainly young people should take responsibility for their lives, but parents, educators and politicians all share some blame for their troubles. College graduates earn much higher wages and are less likely to be unemployed than high school graduates - and those gaps are increasing. Still many recent graduates cannot earn enough to live independently, and they often end up in jobs that don't require a college education.
NEWS
By John L. Hudgins | June 2, 2014
As the nation moves toward President Obama's goal of college degrees for 60 percent of Americans by 2020, the role of historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) becomes even more important - particularly in Maryland, where 48 percent of African American students attend one of four HBCUs, compared with 16 percent nationwide. A college degree is more important than ever, with the pay gap between college graduates and non-graduates reaching a record high last year. According to a Washington Post report, graduates earned on average nearly double the hourly rate of non-graduates.
NEWS
May 14, 2014
The announcement this week that University System of Maryland Chancellor William E. Kirwan is retiring after 12 years on the job comes just as the state is preparing to welcome another gifted leader in the field of higher education, former Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, as the new president of the University of Baltimore. Over the years both men have distinguished themselves as educators and public servants of uncommon ability and proven accomplishment, and we wish them both success as they embark on the next phase of their careers.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells and Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2014
William E. Kirwan, who as chancellor of the University System of Maryland over the past dozen years helped oversee the rise of several of the state's public universities to national prominence, will step down from his position as soon as a successor is found, he said Tuesday. Kirwan, 76, a gregarious leader who maintained good relations with state officials, university presidents, members of the Board of Regents, faculty, business leaders and students, said he hopes to remain active in higher education with work on expanding access for low-income students.
NEWS
By JAMES A. DORN | November 10, 1991
The state's fiscal crisis has thrown a monkey wrench into plans for restructuring Maryland's system of higher education. There have been deep budget cuts, and the retrenchment is expected to continue. The University of Maryland System is in a state of shock.Every crisis presents an opportunity to challenge the status quo and embark on a new path. In the case of higher education, one can challenge the system of state ownership and control and ask if we cannot do better. Instead of restructuring the system of higher education from the center, consider the idea of privatization.
NEWS
May 13, 2014
May 13, 2014 Dear Colleagues: After much thought and reflection, I have decided that the time is right to step down from my position as chancellor of the University System of Maryland (USM).  I informed the USM Board of Regents of my decision last week.  Chairman Jim Shea and the board members requested that I remain as chancellor until they conduct a search and name a successor. This has been a very difficult decision for me because I value so much the opportunity to work on behalf of USM and its 12 institutions.
NEWS
By Wala Blegay | May 6, 2014
President Barack Obama's recent grant award to three Prince George's county schools for the development of student apprenticeship programs in high-demand Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) industries, is a sign of a paradigm shift in American education. Traditional higher education is no longer the guaranteed pathway to successful, prosperous careers and wealth. President Obama and governmental stakeholders are recognizing that skilled job-training or apprenticeship programs in diverse fields are the best solutions to improve economic development for generations of young Americans.
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