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By Jordan Bartel and The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2014
The year's just a little more than half over, but that apparently was plenty of time for music to provide us with some head-scratchingly awful lyrics. Here's some of my favorite worst-of-the-worst (and often NSFW) so far. "Fancy," Iggy Azalea featuring Charli XCX "And my flow retarded, each beat did depart it / Swagger on stupid, I can't shop in no department. " "She Looks So Perfect," 5 Seconds of Summer "You look so perfect standing there / In my American Apparel underwear / And I know now, that I'm so down / Your lipstick stain is a work of art / I got your name tattooed in an arrow heart.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel and The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2014
The year's just a little more than half over, but that apparently was plenty of time for music to provide us with some head-scratchingly awful lyrics. Here's some of my favorite worst-of-the-worst (and often NSFW) so far. "Fancy," Iggy Azalea featuring Charli XCX "And my flow retarded, each beat did depart it / Swagger on stupid, I can't shop in no department. " "She Looks So Perfect," 5 Seconds of Summer "You look so perfect standing there / In my American Apparel underwear / And I know now, that I'm so down / Your lipstick stain is a work of art / I got your name tattooed in an arrow heart.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | December 7, 2006
This week, we're looking at an eclectic mix of new releases from a rowdy Atlanta duo, a great "retro-futuristic" funk band, a legendary foursome and a fascinating Philadelphia soul singer you probably have never heard of. Ying Yang Twins Chemically Imbalanced One of my musical guilty pleasures last year was "Wait (The Whisper Song)," this duo's downright nasty but brilliant smash that garnered a Grammy nomination. The single attracted mainstream play and helped catapult the album USA (United State of Atlanta)
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK and JAY HANCOCK,jay.hancock@baltsun.com | October 18, 2008
Can you blame Wall Street for being confused? Each mortgage security polluting our economy often holds hundreds of loans from dozens of states. Loans got bundled into layers according to default rates and repayment schedules, each batch dependent on what happened in the others. In case that wasn't squirrelly enough, Wall Street bought and sold insurance contracts whose values were ultimately tied to different parts of the unfathomable mortgage pool. "I'd like to know what those damn things are worth," Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke said a year ago this week.
NEWS
September 27, 1991
Until now, the chairmanship of the Governor's Drug and Alcohol Abuse Commission has been a political plum for men who curried favor with William Donald Schaefer. As a result, there has been tremendous public visibility ` both for the chairmen and the commission. But in reality very little has been accomplished. By choosing Neil Solomon to succeed Lt. Gov. Mickey Steinberg as head of the state substance abuse commission, Schaefer has changed the group's focus to a public health perspective.
NEWS
By Sun Herald, Gulfport, Miss | September 16, 1991
COULD A congressional bill that has been gathering dust for more than a year have saved five lives that were snuffed out in a grinding New York subway crash last month?Could all the mandatory drug testing in the world have made a difference? Could there be another way of safeguarding the lives of millions of people who use some form of public transportation each day?Perhaps, perhaps and perhaps.Mandatory federal drug and alcohol testing for airline, railroad and trucking employees has been in effect since 1990.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | October 8, 2008
Lots of sophomore series like ABC's Pushing Daisies are settling into their new season with second episodes tonight, but guess what, viewers don't seem to care. Second-year broadcast network series across the board are down from where they were last year. Network viewers are going elsewhere for their prime-time pleasures, and one of those places is cable's Comedy Central, where The Sarah Silverman Show starts its second season tonight. Silverman isn't for everyone, but those who get the offbeat comedian worship her the way some of us are worshiping Tina Fey these days.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | June 4, 1995
It's official: June is National Iced Tea Month, according to the Tea Council of the U.S.A., and not a minute too soon, as Americans consume more iced tea than anyone else in the world -- that was 40 billion servings last year alone.To keep consumer's tea taste buds titillated, Nestea is introducing Nestea Specialties, a line of gourmet bottled teas, with Earl Grey tea. Regular Nestea Pitcher Style bottled teas come in unsweetened, lightly sweetened and extra sweet. Nestea says folks in the Northeast prefer the lightly sweetened and extra sweetened teas, and also like diet iced tea. In the West and Midwest, tea drinkers like it straight up, without sweetener.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | October 4, 1993
With its eyes more on a dream than a reality, the Greater Baltimore Committee will kick off a monthlong celebration of high technology in Baltimore today.Throughout October, the GBC's Technology Council will be coordinating a series of events spotlighting Baltimore's aspiration to join the elite group of metropolitan areas that are on the cutting edge of science, engineering and technology.Starting with a dinner that is expected to draw much of the region's business and political elite to the Hyatt Regency tonight, the GBC's fourth annual Technology Month will attempt to focus Baltimoreans' attention on high-tech issues through seminars, exhibits, workshops and outreach programs nearly every weekday this month.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA and JEAN MARBELLA,jean.marbella@baltsun.com | September 11, 2008
Pity poor Pratt Street. It is a big street but little loved, one that manages to be pedestrian, as in undistinguished, and yet not pedestrian-friendly, as in eminently stroll-able. No lyricists have been moved to immortalize it, as they have "State Street, that great street," or "the avenue, Fifth Avenue." So I had one question yesterday when the city unveiled a huge, $100 million redevelopment plan to freshen up and enliven the street: Is $100 million enough? No, seriously, Pratt in its current incarnation isn't all that bad. It's just neutral - the equivalent of flyover country.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | October 8, 2008
Lots of sophomore series like ABC's Pushing Daisies are settling into their new season with second episodes tonight, but guess what, viewers don't seem to care. Second-year broadcast network series across the board are down from where they were last year. Network viewers are going elsewhere for their prime-time pleasures, and one of those places is cable's Comedy Central, where The Sarah Silverman Show starts its second season tonight. Silverman isn't for everyone, but those who get the offbeat comedian worship her the way some of us are worshiping Tina Fey these days.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA and JEAN MARBELLA,jean.marbella@baltsun.com | September 11, 2008
Pity poor Pratt Street. It is a big street but little loved, one that manages to be pedestrian, as in undistinguished, and yet not pedestrian-friendly, as in eminently stroll-able. No lyricists have been moved to immortalize it, as they have "State Street, that great street," or "the avenue, Fifth Avenue." So I had one question yesterday when the city unveiled a huge, $100 million redevelopment plan to freshen up and enliven the street: Is $100 million enough? No, seriously, Pratt in its current incarnation isn't all that bad. It's just neutral - the equivalent of flyover country.
NEWS
By Ruma Kumar and Ruma Kumar,Sun reporter | November 13, 2007
Crews scrambled yesterday to repair the scorched patch of a costly artificial turf field at an Anne Arundel County high school after vandals inflicted about $15,000 in damage, forcing the last-minute shifting of state title games for girls' field hockey. Though the state's high school sports association moved the Class 2A and 4A field hockey championship games from Broadneck High, outside of Annapolis, to another Anne Arundel high school, a school district official said crews were working fast so the Class 1A and 3A championship games could resume at Broadneck today as scheduled.
SPORTS
By Patrick Gutierrez and Patrick Gutierrez,Sun Reporter | June 25, 2007
The Panasonic Open, the first leg of the 2007 AST Dew Tour, finished its four-day run at the Camden Yards sports complex yesterday, and tour officials were uncertain whether they would return in 2008. The event, which featured a variety of competitions with professional athletes performing on skateboards, bikes and motorcycles, made its first appearance in Baltimore, but a long-term agreement between the tour and the Maryland Stadium Authority has not been reached. Wade Martin, president and general manager of the tour, said negotiations are continuing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | December 7, 2006
This week, we're looking at an eclectic mix of new releases from a rowdy Atlanta duo, a great "retro-futuristic" funk band, a legendary foursome and a fascinating Philadelphia soul singer you probably have never heard of. Ying Yang Twins Chemically Imbalanced One of my musical guilty pleasures last year was "Wait (The Whisper Song)," this duo's downright nasty but brilliant smash that garnered a Grammy nomination. The single attracted mainstream play and helped catapult the album USA (United State of Atlanta)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Benedict Carey | November 9, 2003
A simple plea for reassurance -- You'd tell me, wouldn't you? -- is about all the discussion many couples can manage on the topic of marital infidelity. That's one reason social scientists have left the study of hidden love largely to novelists and poets. "Although we can describe sexual desire, we don't know how to measure it scientifically," says Dr. Stephen B. Levine, a psychiatrist at Case Western Reserve University's School of Medicine and co-editor of the Handbook of Clinical Sexuality, a guide to help doctors address sexual concerns.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | January 18, 1996
Any day now, we will move forward. The loss of the Colts, the indecency of expansion, the uproar over the Browns' move -- it will all be behind us. Any day now, we will have a new football team, with a new name and new colors. Peace is nearly at hand.Cleveland Mayor Michael White is toning down his rhetoric. The NFL owners are preparing to vote. The scheduled Feb. 12 trial pitting the city of Cleveland against Browns owner Art Modell almost certainly will never take place.Any day now, there will be a team in Baltimore, a promise of a new team for Cleveland, a settlement, a resolution, a conclusion -- 12 years after the Colts bolted town, setting this entire distasteful process in motion.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK and JAY HANCOCK,jay.hancock@baltsun.com | October 18, 2008
Can you blame Wall Street for being confused? Each mortgage security polluting our economy often holds hundreds of loans from dozens of states. Loans got bundled into layers according to default rates and repayment schedules, each batch dependent on what happened in the others. In case that wasn't squirrelly enough, Wall Street bought and sold insurance contracts whose values were ultimately tied to different parts of the unfathomable mortgage pool. "I'd like to know what those damn things are worth," Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke said a year ago this week.
TRAVEL
By Carol Pucci | July 13, 2003
Everyone knows that shopping for airfares has become complicated. Price is just one consideration. Cancellation policies, charges for rebooking and refund policies come into play. Finding a hotel room has become the same. I was reminded of this when I browsed the Web recently for a room in San Francisco. I found a hotel I liked, checked the prices on a few Internet sites that offer discounts, and called the hotel directly to ask for its best corporate rate. The hotel's lowest price was $25 a night more than on Expedia.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Sun Staff | December 9, 2001
We patriotic Americans can only hope it is not too late to convene a military tribunal to check out the suspicious character known as "Santa Claus." If we can catch him. He's a slippery old coot. "Santa" (he often uses only one name, like Carlos the Jackal) appears in the northern sky every year on Christmas Eve. The aerospace warning system NORAD invariably tracks him. But he always manages to infiltrate U.S. air space. No one is quite sure what his nationality is. It's unclear whether he's an American citizen.
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