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Gus G. Sentementes | gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | December 16, 2009
With the first Maryland TechCrawl kicking off tonight, Heather Sarkissian and John Trupiano hope to bring some attention and excitement to those Baltimore-area startup companies that are busy creating high-tech products. The TechCrawl will be a "show and tell," where high-technology product makers pitch their companies' wares to an eager audience of discerning investors, potential partners and curious journalists, organizers said. Each company will have a booth and a home plate - visitors to their booths will step up to the plate and immediately be "pitched" by a company representative for 60 seconds.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2014
Johns Hopkins trauma surgeon Albert Chi gave a talk last year to families about advanced prosthetics that would someday benefit their children who were missing hands. But when a parent asked what was easy, available and affordable now, Chi was at a loss. After focusing on the latest artificial limb technology, he began to hunt for more basic options. Like many researchers, entrepreneurs and even artists in recent years, he turned to the 3-D printer. With one his wife bought him for Father's Day, sheets of colored plastic, and free designs and advice found online, he made a hand for about $20. "One of the first kids we fitted was a 2-year-old," Chi said.
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BUSINESS
October 15, 1990
The Greater Baltimore Committee is sponsoring the activities listed below as part of its High Tech Week from Oct. 29 to Nov. 2.* Monday, Oct. 29: First Greater Baltimore Committee High Tech Forum Dinner at 6 p.m., Baltimore Hyatt Regency, Constellation Ballroom. Cost: $75. Contact: Kendall Shackleford, GBC, 727-2820.* Tuesday, Oct. 30: Foundation for Manufacturing Excellence Kickoff Breakfast, 8-10 a.m., BWI Marriott. Cost: $25. Contact: Bob Noble, Westinghouse, 765-6450.Howard County High Tech Expo and Forum, 8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m., Turf Valley Country Club in Ellicott City.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2014
Big Brother is watching you — through your smart meter? One complaint about the technology, as electric and gas utilities roll it out here and across the country, is that it offers another way for government agencies — or hackers — to snoop on us. The American Civil Liberties Union notes that at least some utilities have turned over customer data after legal demands. San Diego Gas & Electric, required by California regulators to report annually on privacy issues, said it disclosed 3,056 customers' records last year, some of which could have included "energy usage data of varying granularities.
NEWS
September 16, 1992
By the end of this decade, traffic engineers envision highway where your --board computer lets you know instantly of accidents, lengthy backups and the best alternate routes. Sound like wishful science fiction? Not judging from steps taken recently in Maryland and New York to bring high-technology applications to roadways.Last month, Maryland officials approved a $2 million plan for a traffic management center near BWI Airport that will monitor cameras along highways and sensors implanted in the roadbeds to spot accidents, vehicle breakdowns and heavy traffic.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,Sun Staff Writer | August 21, 1994
LiteTrends, a $6.6 million company, is the kind of business that Carroll officials want more of.The high-tech company, which moved to the county three years ago, produces no harmful waste, uses skilled labor and -- if it can find $2 million in private backing -- has potential for growth.With four full-time employees, the company turns tofu into seasoned meat substitute that owners Ed Walker and Andrew J. Wilks hope will become a staple of college dining halls and corporate cafeterias.The company's 6,000-square-foot operation on Progress Way in Eldersburg combines New Age and high tech, reflecting its owners' interests.
BUSINESS
September 18, 1991
The Greater Baltimore Committee's High Tech Forum, a regional group of business, scientific and academic leaders, will sponsor 20 different events as part of the 2nd annual High Tech Assembly.The assembly features three weeks of technology oriented trade fairs, research seminars, scientific conferences and openings of high-tech facilities.More than 25 area businesses, scientific and academic organizations are involved in the events scheduled to begin Sept. 30.This year's events are part of the GBC's overall plan to build a regional economy driven by the life sciences with the potential of creating high-skill and high-wage jobs.
NEWS
By Tim Baker | November 5, 1990
LAST WEEK, Greater Baltimore shifted gears and accelerated on the road to its high-tech future. You could feel the surge at every event during this region's first annual ''High Tech Week.''The Greater Baltimore Committee's High Tech Forum put together the week-long program of technology-oriented trade fairs, research seminars and venture-capital forums to celebrate Baltimore's resurgent entrepreneurial spirit and the emergence of ''Industries of the Mind'' as the driving force in this region's new economy.
NEWS
By TIM BAKER | December 9, 1991
Four years ago this month, this page ran a series of eight columns called ''Maryland's High-Tech Future'' which I wrote with Robert C. Embry Jr. We asserted that the extraordinary scientific research base in the Baltimore-Washington corridor gave this state the opportunity to develop into a technology-driven economic powerhouse.We argued, however, that Maryland could only capture the full economic benefits of its scientific assets if significant changes occurred. We made a number of recommendations based on studies of northern California and other areas of explosive high-tech growth.
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | February 23, 2001
Are technology stocks fairly valued? "High-techs dipped so far that they seem like bargains," says Martin Whitman, investment adviser. "But are they really? Recently, with the economy slowing, many of these stocks just kept sinking." To separate "bargain stocks" from "basket cases," Whitman suggests: "Scrutinize management's record. ... Look into the company's future to see if its business model makes sense. ... Have patience." His recommendations include Kemet Corp., Vishay Intertechnology Inc., USG Corp.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2014
The Savage branch of the Howard County Public Library is once again set to become an open book after an extensive renovation designed to modernize the aging facility and highlight a science and technology theme. "The goal was to make this a more open and inviting space," said Valerie Gross, president and CEO of the county library system. "We want to really emphasize the idea of public education for all. " After a year-and-a-half closure, the branch will celebrate a grand opening July 22. Patrons have used a nearby temporary location during the $6.1 million county-funded revamp.
NEWS
kdavis@baltsun.com | May 16, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley signed a bill Thursday creating a regional 3D printing and additive manufacturing authority in collaboration with the Edgewood Chemical Biological Center at Aberdeen Proving Ground. The bill, creating the Northeast Maryland Additive Manufacturing Authority, or NMAMIA, has been heralded by Harford legislators as the future of manufacturing to bring jobs back into the area and ensure Maryland is at the forefront of innovation. Harford Del. Mary-Dulany James and Del. David Rudolph, who represents Cecil County, introduced the NMAMIA legislation in the House of Delegates and Harford State Sens.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
When they race this month at the Olympics, U.S. speedskaters will suit up in skin-tight, high-tech uniforms that research shows could make a measurable difference in their speed. In a quest to create the world's fastest suit for the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia, two iconic Maryland companies, Under Armour and Lockheed Martin, created a unique collaboration. Already a supplier for the team, Baltimore's hometown sports apparel brand turned to the Bethesda-based defense and aerospace giant to help it fashion the most aerodynamic suit possible, using computer modeling based on filming the athletes and hundreds of hours of wind tunnel testing.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2014
The first U.S.-launched satellite, Explorer I, was 6 feet long and weighed 30 pounds, and it led to the discovery of the Van Allen radiation belt that surrounds Earth. More than 50 years later, scientists could do a lot more with far less. Scientists in Maryland are helping to design satellites that could fit in a shoebox yet provide the same - or better - capabilities as NASA spacecraft that are far larger and more costly. The devices, composed of one or more 10-centimeter cubes, have been used over the past decade for affordable yet relatively low-tech experiments for university students, but a pair recently launched could advance the technology.
BUSINESS
By Marianne Amoss, Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2013
The first indication that KEYW Corp. takes a different approach to business is its name, an adaptation of the airport code for Key West. Then there are the patio furniture in meeting rooms, the parrot mascot and the Jimmy Buffett tune that plays when callers are put on hold. But it's not to be construed as goofing off. “We're not walking around in sandals and shorts,” CEO Len Moodispaw said. “If you were to look at Silicon Valley, which traditionally has been blue jeans and laid-back, we're more like that because of the high-tech workforce we have.” An engineering services firm, KEYW works with software, hardware and systems engineers to develop capabilities and technologies related to cybersecurity, counterterrorism and geospatial intelligence.
NEWS
November 23, 2013
I applaud Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake for finally pushing an initiative that will attempt to fight the sanitation code violations that lead to rat infestation in many neighborhoods in the city ( "Free pilot program in two areas could be expanded," Nov 20). But I am afraid that distributing free trash cans to residents as a solution is probably way too little and way too late. I think this idea that the city will be able to track missing trash cans is pure fantasy. I suspect that in a city where getting an accurate water meter reading is nearly impossible, where miscalculated property taxes are routine, and where speeding tickets issued by cameras cannot hold up in court, that monitoring the whereabouts of trash cans will be pretty far down the list of concerns.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Sun Staff Writer | October 3, 1994
From groundbreaking for a new $22 million bioprocessing center at Johns Hopkins University to a seminar on "Ice Storage: Cooling for the Future" -- it's all technology and it's all part of this month's celebration of Maryland's high-tech businesses and research.The Greater Baltimore Committee has scheduled 53 events during October, its fifth annual "Tech Month," triple last year's offering.The aim of everything from tonight's kickoff dinner to an Oct. 27 trade show for Maryland's five technology business incubators is to promote the creation of more high-tech businesses and jobs, said Victor Hos- kins, executive director of the GBC's technology council.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Staff Writer | September 29, 1992
Baltimore is celebrating the life sciences industry next month -- or at least its wish to become a major center for biotechnology and high-tech companies -- with a steady stream of seminars, groundbreakings and tours.The annual monthlong assembly, which began in 1990 as a coincidence of events rather than by design, will include sessions on creating international partnerships, transferring technology out of local universities, learning to apply entrepreneurship and attracting venture capital.
NEWS
By Dallas Dance | August 26, 2013
Today, more than 108,000 students will leave their homes and return to Baltimore County Public Schools classrooms ready to prepare for the future. Today, the families of our students will entrust their children to us for 180-plus days of learning. Today, more than 805,000 citizens of Baltimore County will depend on us once again to operate schools and educate students in a way that enhances their communities, raises property values and attracts business and investment. It is a new year for all of us, and we all have a lot riding on what happens.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | August 18, 2013
The huge, idle steelworks is impossible to miss as one travels across the Key Bridge. More than once, my boys have asked about the giant plant at Sparrows Point. "What was made there?" "How many people worked there?" "How come nobody works there anymore?" The answer is complex; the full explanation as to why hundreds of acres of prime industrial land are now shuttered goes far beyond one plant located in Sparrows Point, Maryland. I thought about this Ehrlich family discussion while watching the uproar generated by the New York Metropolitan Transportation Authority's decision to allow a subcontract for the steel decks of the Verrazano Narrows Bridge project to be built by a Chinese steel fabricator.
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