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NEWS
By Joseph Ganem | October 3, 2010
Calls for education reform are again dominating the news, which is no surprise during an election year. The usual suspects are being rounded up to blame for the failures in our school systems — poor teachers, lax standards, lack of parental involvement. But is it realistic to expect our schools to be islands of academic rigor within a society that does not model the educational standards it espouses? Let us briefly survey how well many adults might fare in standard academic subjects.
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SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
After a troubled offseason that included four arrests, Ravens players received the usual message about off-the-field behavior by head coach John Harbaugh on Thursday. After accomplishing plenty on the field in the last two months of team activities, Harbaugh warned his team not to undo those positives. “It's always the same high standard,” Harbaugh said. “We always have the same high standard for our guys and it's the same message. There's always an emphasis, different types of emphasis on different things and we've emphasized what we need to with our guys.
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NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | June 24, 2001
U.S. SECRETARY of Education Rod Paige recently compared the latest reading scores of black pupils in Texas with those of their fourth-grade peers across the nation. If Texas scores were the national scores, Paige observed, the gap between black and white performance would be reduced significantly. Here's something even more intriguing: The disparity also would be reduced considerably - by almost 60 percent - if black fourth-graders across the nation had the same reading scores as black pupils in private schools.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2013
Karen P. Vojtko, who was nurse manager of the cardiac-care and progressive-care units at the University of Maryland Medical Center, where her career spanned more than three decades, died Wednesday of cancer at her Abingdon home. She was 56. "Karen had passion, warmth and was caring. She saw her role at the medical center as looking after people," said David G. Hunt, director of nursing and patient care services for cardiac care and radiology at the University of Maryland Medical Center.
NEWS
By This article was reported by Sun staff writers Tom Bowman, Caitlin Francke, Dana Hedgpeth, Scott Shane and Craig Timberg, and written by Shane | January 26, 1998
Some years ago, Linda Tripp's son Ryan teased the daughter of a neighbor. That evening, the neighbor called Tripp to enlist her help in easing tensions between the children. "If my children do anything wrong, let me know," said the neighbor."I'm not a tattletale," Tripp retorted.The portrait of Linda Rose Tripp is still a work in progress, but one thing is clear. The woman whose secret tapes now threaten to bring down a president no longer can make that claim.As a small-time White House staff member, Tripp displayed a knack for being in the right place to witness big-time news.
NEWS
October 13, 2011
In a recent editorial ("Is tutoring effective?" Oct. 11), The Sun asserted that there was little oversight of organizations providing tutoring to low-income students trapped in failing schools. In the same way we need to hold schools to high standards, we must also hold providers to high standards. But we should not confuse too little oversight with proof that the program isn't effective. Far from it. A recent report by the U.S. Department of Education found that tutoring led to significant gains in math and reading achievement compared to eligible non-participants.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,SUN REPORTER | December 10, 2006
If Navy upsets Boston College in the Meineke Car Care Bowl on New Year's weekend, thousands of midshipmen who attend -- spending up to $400 in travel funds supplied by the Naval Academy -- could get an extra weekend off, according to tradition. The football program will get priceless publicity, and the school's athletic department will collect at least a million-dollar windfall that could push profits above last year's $6.2 million. Win or lose, Paul Johnson will walk off the field as one of college football's highest-paid coaches, after getting a hefty raise on Thursday.
NEWS
June 14, 2002
CITY COLLEGE is reclaiming its stature as an incubator for college-bound students. This is an achievement to be savored, not just by the public high school's visionary leaders and high-profile alumni, but by all who care about the future of Baltimore. Excellent public schools give families reasons to stay in the city. And families with children aspiring to higher education form a core population that Baltimore should be fighting to keep. To restore academic prestige that had waned, Principal Joseph Wilson and the school's extended family held themselves and the students to high standards.
NEWS
March 9, 2010
The problem with former University of Maryland School of Law Dean Karen Rothenberg can be (and should be) resolved quite simply ("The $410,000 question," Mar. 7). She should return the full $410,000 that was inappropriately given to her by the university. It does not matter how great a fundraiser she was, or how accomplished she was as a scholar, or how much money she could have earned at another job (see letters by Larry Gibson and Paul Bekman). What matters is that she lives up to the same high standards that are required of the law students and the faculty.
EXPLORE
March 19, 2012
I had a number of reasons for suspending my campaign for the District 1 seat on thePrince George's CountyBoard of Education. But high on that list is my regard for Zabrina Epps. After meeting her and talking with her at some length, I realized that we shared a similar vision for education, both the global, big-picture view of education, as well as what is needed at the local, classroom level. That includes a vision of a school system without barriers, infused with a culture of achievement and held to high standards of transparency and meaningful, two-way communication with families.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2013
Joseph Fairbanks, a retired Baltimore litigator who was an inspiration and mentor to younger attorneys, died June 12 of cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Columbia. He was 68. "Every litigation associate in our Baltimore office sought Joe out. He was a mentor and a counselor," said Charles O. Monk III, a longtime friend and managing partner in the Baltimore office of Saul Ewing LLP. "Having practiced law for more than 20 years, I can say that Joe was the most honest and trustworthy attorney I've ever known," said Dana N. Pescosolido, a former law partner who is now deputy general counsel at Legg Mason.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2013
Tudor charm is in abundance at 711 Chumleigh Road in the Baltimore County neighborhood of Stoneleigh. Sitting on almost a quarter of an acre, this white stucco home is being offered for $889,000. "This is one of the finest examples of a Stoneleigh home that has been lovingly renovated and restored," said listing agent Ashley Richardson with Long & Foster Real Estate. "Such incredible care was taken to perfect every detail, down to the repointing of the stonework, the slate roof on the addition and the copper flashing.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2013
Maryland's 2013 season could be compared to an exhilarating amusement-park ride that kept passengers highly entertained through the first half before sputtering out and leaving riders wanting more. After back-to-back appearances in the national title game, the Terps fell well short of that goal this spring, falling to Cornell, 16-8, in the first round of the NCAA tournament Sunday. With the loss, Maryland extended its national crown drought to 38 years. As frustrating as that is, however, coach John Tillman said the program will not lower the bar. “Our expectations will always be the same,” he said.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2012
Clarence Edward Beard, a retired Baltimore County public schools vocal music teacher, died of kidney failure Sept. 28 at his Pikesville home. He was 97. Born in Westminster, he was raised on his parents' dairy farm. He was a 1932 graduate of Westminster High School, where he played soccer. During the Depression of the 1930s, his father traded land, now used as a golf course, to the old Western Maryland College for tuition for his children, family members said. Mr. Beard earned a bachelor's degree in music and mathematics at the school, now called McDaniel College.
EXPLORE
March 19, 2012
I had a number of reasons for suspending my campaign for the District 1 seat on thePrince George's CountyBoard of Education. But high on that list is my regard for Zabrina Epps. After meeting her and talking with her at some length, I realized that we shared a similar vision for education, both the global, big-picture view of education, as well as what is needed at the local, classroom level. That includes a vision of a school system without barriers, infused with a culture of achievement and held to high standards of transparency and meaningful, two-way communication with families.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | January 27, 2012
The new heads of Baltimore police training and discipline met with reporters on Friday and expressed their desire to improve the agency that has been troubled by allegations of corruption last year. Greyland Williams, a longtime DEA agent who grew up in New York, and John A. King, a former Montgomery County officer who retired as deputy chief, seemed to know their role well in Baltimore. They each have challenging jobs, with city police coming off a year in which one cop got charged with selling heroin from a station house parking lot , more than a dozen others were indicted in a kickback scheme involving a towing company, and four officers shot a plainclothes colleague who they mistook for a gunman fatally shooting somebody else.
NEWS
August 31, 2010
Just for the record, this mother of two Polytechnic Institute graduates wants it known that Dr. Barney Wilson was the best principal I ever worked with in 15 years raising four children ("Poly Principal Barney Wilson is reassigned to Reginald Lewis High," Aug. 11). He worked seven days a week for that school, whether it was meeting with teachers, parents, students, painting the steps and hallways, or trying to raise funds from businessmen and alumnae. Dr. Wilson had such high standards for his students.
NEWS
By Charles Murray | January 11, 1993
PRESIDENT-ELECT Bill Clinton is right to make education a top priority.He is wrong in his understanding of what needs fixing.Not one of his main educational policies -- increased loan assistance for college students, national educational standards linked to federal aid and more job retraining -- addresses the problems we are facing.Here are some propositions that Mr. Clinton and Richard W. Riley, his nominee for secretary of education, should look into:* Giving qualified students a chance at college is something we already do well.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | December 20, 2011
Ray Lewis' first game since suffering a turf toe injury on his right foot played out in typical fashion with the 12-time Pro Bowl inside linebacker leading the Ravens in tackles in Sunday night's 34-14 loss to the San Diego Chargers. After the contest, Lewis spoke about playing for the first time since Nov. 13 when he sustained the injury in a 22-17 loss to the Seattle Seahawks. “I felt good,” he said. “I never injured myself one time, and I take my hat off to this organization because we made some real hard decisions the last couple of weeks [of]
NEWS
October 13, 2011
In a recent editorial ("Is tutoring effective?" Oct. 11), The Sun asserted that there was little oversight of organizations providing tutoring to low-income students trapped in failing schools. In the same way we need to hold schools to high standards, we must also hold providers to high standards. But we should not confuse too little oversight with proof that the program isn't effective. Far from it. A recent report by the U.S. Department of Education found that tutoring led to significant gains in math and reading achievement compared to eligible non-participants.
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