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NEWS
October 11, 2012
While your recent editorial ("A great investment," Oct. 10) is critical of the efforts made by opponents of the Dream Act, I would encourage you not to overlook the efforts being made by Dream Act supporters. The Intersection is a non-profit organization in Baltimore that empowers high school students to have ownership in improving their communities. The students of The Intersection, having completed a rigorous training program, seek to make a difference. In doing so, they have focused their efforts on passing the Dream Act. Students from The Intersection have talked with their peers, canvassed Baltimore neighborhoods, and pushed their communities to spread the word and garner support.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Michael Hensley | October 13, 2014
I've taught math at Oakland Mills High School in Howard County for seven years. In that time, I've read hundreds of articles about the problems in American math education. But I've yet to see a mention of the single biggest crisis I face in my classroom. Howard County has a policy of placing every ninth grade student into at least Algebra I - even if the student is currently doing math at a fourth grade level. As a direct result of this policy, students enter my classroom lacking essential prerequisite knowledge.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley announced $5.5 million in grants to local boards of education Wednesday to increase the use of digital technology in education and to help students earn college credits and career certification while in high school. At a news conference outside the State House, O'Malley and state school Superintendent Lillian M. Lowery announced six winners of grants under a program called the Early College Innovation Fund and seven under the Digital Learning Innovation Fund.
BUSINESS
By Luke Broadwater and Lorraine Mirabella and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
After decades of manufacturing decline in Baltimore, city officials say they believe industry is poised to bounce back — and they want to promote a new education track in city schools to train students for the field. The Computer Numerical Control Manufacturing program, being offered this year at Carver Vocational-Technical High School, will train high school students for hard-to-fill skilled machinist jobs. Despite years of job losses, more than 12,000 people worked at more than 440 manufacturing companies last year in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Will FespermanThe Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
A few hundred high school juniors gathered in a ring around a hawk as it devoured a squirrel Tuesday morning at the Naval Academy. Brandishing their smartphones, the crowd groaned and cheered at the action. "Take a picture and move on," an academy midshipman shouted. It was the only blood the teens saw during their week at the Naval Academy Summer Seminar for high school students. But there was plenty of talk about warfare, and about other things that fly — such as the U.S. military's V-22 Ospreys, a tiltrotor aircraft that some of the students might one day fly. The academy's Summer Seminar, which offers three weeklong sessions in June, aims to give rising high school seniors a taste of life at the academy before they apply to colleges in the fall.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2010
A rear seat belt that inflates like an airbag upon impact. A radar-based technology that warns of an impending collision. A car that does the parallel parking for you. All these cutting-edge safety-related technologies developed by Ford Motor Co. were on display Wednesday for high school students in a Johns Hopkins University summer engineering program. The Dearborn, Mich.-based auto manufacturer called the event an opportunity for prospective engineers of the future to explore some of the car safety technologies that are about to emerge for the ultimate test drive in the marketplace.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer | arin.gencer@baltsun.com | October 13, 2009
The students surveyed the photographs spread out on the table - a mix of black-and-white and color pictures depicting schoolchildren, a wedding and other family moments. "This is gonna be hard," said senior Harry Mikula, 17, looking at a partially discolored fourth-grade class photo dated 1968-1969. Katie Calkins, his teacher at Patapsco High School and Center for the Arts, picked up a more recent picture of an older woman that was stuck to another photograph, posing a different problem.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2012
Forty-four of the nation's brightest high school students are in Baltimore to test their brains about the brain — in a two-day neuroscience competition that started Sunday morning with a visit to the cadaver laboratory in the University of Maryland School of Medicine and, for many of the teenagers, their first encounter with gray matter. Some had observed sheep's brains and rabbit brains in biology class, and all had studied plastic brain models and atlases as they prepared for the fifth annual U.S. National Brain Bee, founded by a University of Maryland neuroscientist.
NEWS
March 19, 2013
The Maryland State Medical Society recognizes the health risks of adolescent sleep deprivation and for that reason recommends Maryland adopt later start times in the state's high schools ("Md. school systems study later start times for high schools," March 11). Studies indicate that a modest delay in school start time is associated with significant improvements in adolescent alertness, mood and health. A 2010 study published in the Archives of Pediatric & Adolescent Medicine offered compelling evidence for the potential benefits of adjusting school schedules to adolescents' sleep needs, circadian rhythms and developmental stage.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2011
Jeremy Dy was among a small group of Chesapeake Science Point Public Charter School students who took the PSAT/NMSQT, a national standardized test considered a precursor to college entrance exams, during the past school year. He and his peers excelled at the test, which is good, because they might be retaking it a few times. While most students take the test during 10th and 11th grades, some CSP students were tested as sixth-graders. Their efforts illustrate how students at the Hanover charter school are excelling at national levels, particularly in math.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
Two 16-year-olds who are students from Bel Air High School were killed in a car crash in Kingsville on Friday night, according to Baltimore County police. Police were called at 11:25 p.m. to Mt. Vista Road and Gontrum Road, where a 2001 Mitsubishi Eclipse had struck a tree. The driver and passenger, both males, were pronounced dead at the scene. Police have not identified them. The cause of the remains under investigation, police said. Harford County schools spokeswoman Jillian Lader said counselors would be available to students during the school's homecoming dance, which was scheduled for Saturday night.
NEWS
June 27, 2014
This fall, Maryland's public schools will start their second year under the Common Core Standards, and the controversy sparked by last year's rocky roll-out appears far from dying down. Parents, teachers, students and political leaders have all questioned the state's implementation of the standards, if not the standards themselves. We recognize that this transition is difficult and that some teachers and students, particularly those in higher grades, may be struggling to adapt to these new educational goals.
NEWS
June 19, 2014
I have thought the college process is a little over the top after having put four children through college ( "We share the blame for college student woes," June 16). The stress and the drama associated with high school students looking to make "the right choice" and going to seminars to have a chance at a "stretch" school seems to be rooted in money. Consultants, teachers, guidance counselors, the colleges and universities are all in on making it a circus. We need to set expectations correctly as parents.
NEWS
By Will FespermanThe Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
A few hundred high school juniors gathered in a ring around a hawk as it devoured a squirrel Tuesday morning at the Naval Academy. Brandishing their smartphones, the crowd groaned and cheered at the action. "Take a picture and move on," an academy midshipman shouted. It was the only blood the teens saw during their week at the Naval Academy Summer Seminar for high school students. But there was plenty of talk about warfare, and about other things that fly — such as the U.S. military's V-22 Ospreys, a tiltrotor aircraft that some of the students might one day fly. The academy's Summer Seminar, which offers three weeklong sessions in June, aims to give rising high school seniors a taste of life at the academy before they apply to colleges in the fall.
NEWS
By Peter Morici | June 16, 2014
Despite five years of economic recovery, college graduates continue to face a tough job market. Certainly young people should take responsibility for their lives, but parents, educators and politicians all share some blame for their troubles. College graduates earn much higher wages and are less likely to be unemployed than high school graduates - and those gaps are increasing. Still many recent graduates cannot earn enough to live independently, and they often end up in jobs that don't require a college education.
NEWS
June 4, 2014
Karl Alexander and Doris Entwisle tracked nearly 800 children who began first grade in a Baltimore City public school in 1982 and found that only 4 percent of those who came from low-income families eventually earned a college degree ( "Baltimore study indicates family influences academic, work place success ," June 2). It was noted in the article that there are programs in other parts of the country that successfully help children from low-income families achieve academic success.
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Staff Writer | November 18, 1992
Parents, don't panic if your son or daughter doesn't come home from high school today with a report card.Your child isn't hiding it. The dog didn't eat it.Anne Arundel County school officials announced yesterday that report cards for high school students will be delayed nearly a week because of problems in computing new academic eligibility for students involved in extracurricular activities.High school students will receive their report cards Tuesday, said school spokeswoman Nancy Jane Adams.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | February 28, 1993
Devron Troy Young, a senior acting student at the Baltimore School for the Arts, recently won an award of $1,500 from the National Foundation for Advancement in the Arts. Also receiving $1,500 awards were visual artist Matthew Richard Saunders, a senior at Towson High School, and Jillian Lynn Harris, a modern dancer and senior at Oakland Mills High School in Columbia.These young artists were among 301 high school students throughout the country who shared $177,700 in cash awards given by the NFAA after its annual talent search.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
A group of high school students studying atmospheric pressure and temperature is searching for a weather balloon and payload of research equipment they think disappeared somewhere in White Hall. The students, from Little Red School House and Elisabeth Irwin High School in New York City, launched the balloon about 9 a.m. Sunday from Chambersburg, Pa. But they lost radio contact with it about 15 minutes later, and they were unable to track it, junior Alexander Daley said in an e-mail.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2014
Marriotts Ridge High School senior Tianhao Gao approached taking the SAT with one primary objective: score well enough to prevent needing to take it a second time. To say she accomplished that goal is an understatement. The Ellicott City resident, who also goes by Tina, scored a 2370, just 30 points from an overall perfect score and including perfect scores (800 each) in the math and reading categories. Her efforts were enough to draw the attention of the White House Commission on Presidential Scholars, appointed by the president to annually award students with one of the nation's highest honors for academic or artistic achievement.
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