Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHigh School Seniors
IN THE NEWS

High School Seniors

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 12, 2012
Recent articles and editorials touched on some of the relationship between school hours and suspension rates and teenagers' biological clocks and the benefits of keeping kids in school ("How early is too early for high school students," March 8; "Suspension as a last resort," March 5). But they omitted any discussion of how high school students should be spending their afternoons. By the end of eleventh grade, the average public school student in Maryland has acquired most of the credits that they will need to graduate.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jonathon Rondeau | September 4, 2014
Throughout the Baltimore City school year, student success will be measured in the traditional ways, through test scores and grades, and, for high school seniors, by whether or not they graduate. While tracking such standards is vital to understanding student achievement and progress as well as the success of our school system as a whole, another key indicator deserves far more focused attention: attendance. For students to succeed in school, they have to be in school. And not enough of Baltimore City students are attending school as much as they should.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati and Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2011
Scholarships for 350 Maryland high school seniors have been restored, Gov. Martin O'Malley announced Wednesday, just days after state officials told scholarship winners they had lost the college money because of budget cuts. Eliminating the Distinguished Scholars award, which provides $3,000 annually for high-achieving students who attend Maryland universities, was part of a package of budget cuts presented by O'Malley to the General Assembly this year. Cutting the award was estimated to save the state just over $1 million.
NEWS
By Will FespermanThe Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
A few hundred high school juniors gathered in a ring around a hawk as it devoured a squirrel Tuesday morning at the Naval Academy. Brandishing their smartphones, the crowd groaned and cheered at the action. "Take a picture and move on," an academy midshipman shouted. It was the only blood the teens saw during their week at the Naval Academy Summer Seminar for high school students. But there was plenty of talk about warfare, and about other things that fly — such as the U.S. military's V-22 Ospreys, a tiltrotor aircraft that some of the students might one day fly. The academy's Summer Seminar, which offers three weeklong sessions in June, aims to give rising high school seniors a taste of life at the academy before they apply to colleges in the fall.
NEWS
By JONI GUHNE | May 25, 1995
If you felt a sudden rush of air today, it was probably the giant sigh of relief coming from Central County's graduating high school seniors. Today is the last day of high school for hundreds them. They're going to take a break from studying to celebrate the fact that nobody is going to yell at them for not doing their homework for at least three months.* Broadneck High's seniors clean out their lockers for the last time today. Their graduation ceremony is scheduled for 3 p.m. Saturday at the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC)
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Staff Writer | April 2, 1993
Only a few male teachers could get away with wearing an earring in one lobe to class. Or female teachers with wearing a lacrosse kilt and T-shirt.But then, Steve Burr and Nicole Merzendorf aren't your typical teachers. They are two of seven Chesapeake High School seniors who help teach science to fifth-graders through the Anne Arundel County school system's Science Student Teaching Program.Every Thursday, they visit Jean Snow's fifth-graders at Fort Smallwood Elementary School to teach the latest unit on geology or physics.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,Staff Writer | March 29, 1992
He has researched the phenomenon of "sleep paralysis" and compared the stress levels of nurses who work in trauma centers and neonatal intensive care units. And although he has written poetry, he prefers the essay, a form in which he can argue the facts with logic.She is analyzing Milton's "Samson Agonistes" and preparing for a summer chamber music concert in Austria. And when she describes why she writes fiction, she explains, by way of Descartes: If reading is "a conversation with the great minds," then it's only "polite to respond."
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | November 6, 1996
Despite a slow start in some counties, the state's high school seniors are moving steadily toward completion of their student service-learning requirements, state school officials have told the Maryland State Board of Education.As of February, only one-third of the Class of 1997 -- the first class required to do 75 hours of community service as a condition of graduation, under a 1992 requirement -- had completed their hours.But state officials say that as of Oct. 21, more than 29,000 of the state's 44,153 seniors, or more than 65 percent, had completed the requirement.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Sun reporter | August 30, 2006
In Maryland and across the country, high school seniors got much lower scores on their SATs last academic year - perhaps, officials say, because the new test is longer and fewer students were willing to take it twice to improve their results. The average combined verbal and math score went down 7 points nationwide - the largest single-year drop in three decades - and 11 points in Maryland. The state's decline is attributed to a significant increase in the number of students, especially from Baltimore, who were enrolled in less-rigorous courses when they took the test.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 21, 1999
One-third of the country's high school seniors do not understand the fundamentals of American government, according to results of a national test administered by the Education Department.The tests showed that 26 percent of high school seniors had "proficient" knowledge of the workings of the government. And most of those polled, 65 percent, were defined as "at or above" a basic level. But 35 percent were below the minimum requirement.The test was part of the National Assessment of Educational Progress, often called the nation's report card.
TRAVEL
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2014
As Ocean City braces for Senior Week, the annual migration of graduating high school students to the beaches, thousands more young partyers are expected to join them. A loosely organized College Takeover Beach Week also starts this weekend, an event that surprised Virginia Beach last year when an influx of up to 40,000 visitors was accompanied by a rise in cases of violence and disorderly behavior. Ocean City officials say they won't be caught off-guard and have prepared for both Senior Week and the "takeover" with increased patrols and new boardwalk surveillance cameras that will be monitored in real time.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2014
A young girl approached the casket of Michael Mayfield on Thursday and began to scream. The music in the church had fallen silent, and the hundreds who had turned out to mourn the 17-year-old Mayfield turned their eyes to the child with braids and white floral barrettes. A police officer, moved by the scene, uttered, "Jesus. " A man carried the little girl to the exit with tears streaming down his own face. Mayfield, a college-bound senior at Edmondson-Westside High School who was shot to death in West Baltimore last week, was the eighth teen gunned down this year in Baltimore - and one of three within an eight-day period.
SPORTS
By Alexander Pyles and The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2013
Emily Granger, a three-sport athlete at Saints Peter and Paul in Easton, was named the female winner of the Wendy's High School Heisman Award on Friday. Granger, who plays basketball, lacrosse and soccer, was selected last month as Maryland's female finalist for the award and was chosen as one of 11 national finalists. “It's just such an amazing feeling,” Granger said. “Not even getting the award, but just to be recognized among all these amazing people is the greatest feeling in the world.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2013
A Delaware beach resort town that was the scene last June of a teenage party visited by Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler issued a statement Monday criticizing parents who rent homes there for "senior week" celebrations. The statement issued by the South Bethany town government reminded property owners of the steps it has taken and plans to take to discourage parties such as the one Gansler dropped by. Underage participants said many at the party were drinking. In a message to property owners, the town emphasized its identity as one of Delaware's "Quiet Resorts.
NEWS
By Aviva J. Woolf, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2013
While most high school seniors spend their last few days planning end-of-the-year parties, reminiscing with friends or trying to fit in one last prank on the freshmen, Nicolas "Cole" Holocker is accepting the 2013 Ravens Scholarship awarded to students committed to improving their community. Holocker, a Century High School senior, along with five other Baltimore area students, will receive a $5,000 renewable scholarship (up to $20,000 over four years) to put toward college. The program, funded by the Ravens All Community Team Foundation, is in its fourth consecutive year awarding local students for outstanding achievements.
EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis | May 30, 2013
Editor: The Al Cesky Scholarship Fund, Inc. celebrated the 28th Anniversary of the Al Cesky Scholarship Awards Banquet on May 15, at the Richlin Ballroom. At the banquet, the fund awarded $54,000 in scholarships to 24 outstanding Harford County student-athletes. Those scholarship winners embody the purpose of the Al Cesky Scholarship Fund, Inc., namely, to preserve and keep visible the values reflected in the life and work of Al Cesky, with special reference to his contributions to the spiritual, emotional and intellectual development of youth and his role in fostering community life.
SPORTS
By Connor Letourneau, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2012
Lexie Brown prides herself on preparation. She appreciates organization and understands the importance of planning ahead. So when the Maryland women's basketball recruit became one of three high school seniors selected to the Under-18 USA National Team in May, she was nervous. Not to spend 11 days apart from her family training with the squad in Colorado. Not even to face the world's top competition. No, Brown's chief concern was maintaining her unblemished grade-point average.
SPORTS
By Connor Letourneau, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2012
Lexie Brown prides herself on preparation. She appreciates organization and understands the importance of planning ahead. So when the Maryland women's basketball recruit became one of three high school seniors selected to the Under-18 USA National Team in May, she was nervous. Not to spend 11 days apart from her family training with the squad in Colorado. Not even to face the world's top competition. No, Brown's chief concern was maintaining her unblemished grade-point average.
NEWS
July 14, 2012
Parents of rising high school seniors with college aspirations have likely spent a good chunk of time this year experiencing that peculiar educational tradition known as the "college visit. " Even those who have already criss-crossed the country catering to the whims of a child enthralled with the prospect of attending school on the West Coast or maybe in the Northeast or perhaps Florida, or all three simultaneously, if that were only possible, may have miles to go yet before they sleep.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.